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Showing posts with label United Nations. Show all posts
Showing posts with label United Nations. Show all posts

Tuesday, December 10, 2019

Promoting International Human Rights and the Rule of Law

Living in a Globalized World

It is not a secret that Globcal International believes in and understands the ideals of the United Nations in protecting human rights and upholding an international rule of law. Our world today is more globalized than ever with nations and corporations depending more and more on international trade and commerce. Without globalization countries like the United Kingdom and the United States would have no coffee, tea, chocolate, avocados, or bananas, either would the others

Over 200 countries and thousands of organizations belong to and depend on the United Nations to make the world a better place and be part of the global community. Most have ratified the international declarations and conventions that have been created by all of the nations collectively. These include the Sustainable Development Goals Agenda, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the Geneva Convention and many others.

Despite this globalization and globalism has become a great threat to many people politically because their governments feel that it threatens their independence and sovereignty. People that oppose the ideals of the UN staunchly have even created conspiracy theories about them and attack its failures which are propagated politically by the same nation-states. 


Watch people around the world reading articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in more than 80 languages. (Photo: United Nations)

People Have No "Human Rights" Except from the UN

While people like the ideal of having human and civil rights, as citizens of their nations they actually do not have any human rights at all except those specified in their own national constitutions. Either way when their human rights or constitutional rights are violated there are no authorities where they can take their grievances except to courts that are part of the same nation that has violated them. 

It is very clear that police and military forces working for the state frequently violate the human and civil rights of their citizens in protests advocating these rights, we have seen this year in Algeria, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Hong Kong, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Lebanon, Ukraine, the United States, Venezuela and many other countries resulting in death and injury of their citizens that will never be addressed or accounted for because the people belong to their nations, much like cattle, chickens and pigs belong to the farmers that raise them.

When people are travelling though, they do implicitly possess international human rights when they are outside of their nation, this is because when they enter a country they do so under these universal rights as unknown civil human beings. As visitors to a country for whatever purpose they simply agree to abide by the general laws and customs of the nation they are visiting, but likewise they do not necessarily possess the constitutional rights afforded to a country's citizens. Likewise they are not obliged by all of the nations laws that are specific to their citizens like paying tax on their income, they do not qualify for the benefits of citizenship, they do not have rights like the ability to vote or to take someone to court, or in many cases even receive police protection.

US citizens and the citizens of the more developed countries are lucky because they are better respected, these countries 'try to take care' of their 'good citizens' when abroad through embassies that help to provide for their needs when travelling. These better developed countries have ambassadors, consulates, or embassies in nearly every country for business, economic development, trade and tourism, how well some of them can take care of their citizens depends on which country we are talking about. Smaller and underdeveloped countries that do not have an embassy often cannot offer any services at all to their citizens, so travellers from these country's depend on the nation they are visiting to respect the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Some of the countries that depend on tourism like Mexico have special police and services that are there specifically for tourists.

There are also countries like Dominica which have completely useless ambassadors with no experience that exist in countries like Malaysia, but do not offer services to citizens and are there only for the benefit of themselves (not even the state) according to a recent report by Al Jazeera. If you are travelling as one of their citizens don't expect much in the way of services while abroad

The chance for a human being to take their government for a violation of their human rights to the International Court of Justice in the Hague is nil to none.

United Nations Declaration of Human Rights

Only the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and countries agreeing with the declaration provide people with basic human rights, but there are no laws or forums 'inside of a country' that can guarantee your human rights outside of those outlined under constitutional laws. According to Wikipedia the United States is in the highest category with 86 of 100 points on the human and civil liberties it provides, it is tied at number 33 in the world with Slovenia, Norway is number one on the World Freedom Index

Human rights are for everyone, today is the 71st anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, it is one of the principle treaties that is supposedly respected by all of its member states. Despite this the greatest violator of these rights remains to be governments and corporations in order to protect their power and wealth. Think about it, we are here at Globcal International.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which was adopted by the UN General Assembly on 10 December 1948, was the result of the experience of the Second World War. (Photo: United Nations)


Our Answer to the Problem

In 2015 with the introduction of the Global Goals for Sustainable Development we introduced a program for individuals based on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other treaties that are in force around the world recognized by most nation-states with plans to develop a supplementary identification for global citizens and those who support the ideals of the United Nations. The project we developed was stalled by international politics as the world moved towards nationalism in 2017 and 2018, currently we are reintroducing the program for those who have a valid passport who believe in the ideal of global citizenship, we see it as an answer to nationalized discrimination practices and those who are travelling abroad. The program is available online now and we hope to be able to make our first international complimentary travel documents in 2020 for those who go abroad.

To learn more about our current program please review the Global Citizenship Registration program initiative we have underway. 

Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Price of a Plate of Food - World Food Day

October 16th, 2018 marks World Food Day, an International Observance promoted by the United Nations and recognized by Globcal International. This article by Herve Verhoosel, Senior Spokesperson at the UN World Food Programme (WFP) and is republished from the Inter Press Service, News Agency to observe World Food Day.

True Cost of a Plate of Food Around the World

How much would you expect to pay for the most basic plate of food? The kind of thing you might whip up at home – nothing fancy, just enough to fill you up and meet a third of today’s calorie needs. A soup, maybe, or a simple stew – some beans or lentils, a handful of rice, bread, or corn?

In the rich Global North – say, in New York State, USA – such a meal would cost almost nothing to make: 0.6 percent of the average daily income, or US$1.20.

In parts of the developing world, by contrast, food affordability can shrink to the point of absurdity: in South Sudan, a country born out of war and disintegrating into more war, the meal-to-income ratio is 300 times that of industrialized countries.

It is, in other words, as if a New Yorker had to pay nearly US$348.36 for the privilege of cooking and eating that plate of food.

How do people in South Sudan afford it? It’s simple. They don’t.

An FAO/WFP Crop and Food Security Assessment Mission (CFSAM) visited South Sudan in 2011 to estimate cereal production and assess the overall food-security situation. (Photo UN)

This is not a unique issue to South Sudan. Across the board, food is becoming ever less affordable in poorer countries that are subject to political instabilities.

Lack of access to food, and the costliness of it, have many causes: climate extremes, natural disasters, post-harvest losses, or bad governance, all of which can damage- or even shatter- farming supply chains and markets.

But, one overriding cause stands out: conflict. At WFP, we’ve long known that hunger and war are tragically symbiotic. Which makes it that much harder to eradicate the one without ending the other.

The 2018 edition of WFPs Counting the Beans: The True Cost of a Plate of Food Around the World index, now spanning 52 countries, underscores this clear correlation between food affordability costs and political stability and security.

The index looks at whether food costs for the original 33 countries analyzed in 2017 have risen or fallen, and compares costs for the same meal in some of the world’s poorest places with one of its richest, by using a New York baseline to highlight vast gaps in global food affordability.

In many countries, it was found that food affordability measured in this way has actually improved since 2017. This is situational, thanks to strong economic growth, political stability, and/or a better rainy season- or in the case of southern Africa- humanitarian assistance helping to offset the effects of severe drought.

Though despite such progress made in many countries through the past year, food costs are often still intensely disproportionate in relation to income. This is the case across much of Africa, as well as in parts of Asia and, to a lesser degree, of Latin America.

Among the countries surveyed for the study, Peru tops the list with the most affordable plate at the NY equivalent of US$ 3.44, just 1.6 percent of per capita income, vs. what that same plate would cost in New York, amounting to 0.6 percent of per capita income.

While Laos and Jordan are close runners-up to Peru, other countries have deteriorated. Almost invariably, these are nations where peace has been (further) eroded by violence, insecurity or political tension, including South Sudan- where the cost of a plate of food has soared from the exorbitant 155 percent of daily income in 2016 (USD $321.70) to 201.7 percent of daily income in 2018 (USD $348.36).

It now costs twice the national daily income to buy a plate of food in South Sudan. Northeast Nigeria took second to last place, at USD $222.05, or 128.6 percent of daily income in 2018, up from USD $200.32, or 121 percent of daily income in 2016.

These abysmal numbers highlight the vast gaps in global food affordability, where 821 million people go hungry while elsewhere one can get a simple nutritious meal with a just a handful of change.

The fact that this still occurs defies both reason and decency, and it’s why we – the World Food Programme and other humanitarian partners – are there.

However, the impact of WFP and other humanitarian actors in saving and changing lives cannot be sustained without political investment, good governance, transparent markets, and wider partnerships.

Societies cannot lift themselves out of the poverty trap if families are continuously priced out of providing their children with the nutritional meals essential for them to develop into healthy and productive adults, if climate degradation continues to threaten food security and development gains, and if protracted conflicts continue to destroy societies and force young talent elsewhere.

With a concerted global effort, the international community can achieve the UN Sustainable Development Goals and end hunger and malnutrition. Governments must engage with and support their developing country counterparts in peacebuilding, conflict resolution and disaster risk reduction.

The private sector must embrace that turning a profit can go hand in hand with advancing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) through employing young people to boost incomes, sourcing from smallholder farms, and through working alongside leaders to strengthen supply chains.

The shocking and outraging numbers in this year’s “Counting the Beans” index highlight that peaceful societies and affordable food go hand in hand. We have the modern technological capacities to end world hunger, but first we must end the conflict that fosters it.

Together, we can work towards reversing the figures in this year’s index, and ensure that in the future, nobody will have to work a day and a half to afford a simple meal.

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

Fighting Hunger with Bytes of Data and the Blockchain

What is ‘Blockchain’ and How is it Connected to Fighting Hunger?

Photo: WFP/Alexandra Alden

‘This can revolutionize assistance to vulnerable families across the globe.’

The World Food Programme (WFP) is testing the use of blockchain, a bold technology that can potentially transform the fight against hunger. Blockchain technology, most famously associated with the crypto-currency Bitcoin, offers unique opportunities for humanitarian agencies to provide the best-possible assistance to vulnerable people around the world.

What is blockchain?

Put simply, blockchains provide a way for two parties to do business with each other without the need for a trusted third party. Akin to emails, information on the blockchain can flow from one address to another. The content of the message, for example, can be a value transfer, a beneficiary’s ID, or somebody’s health records.

Where markets are functioning, cash-based transfers allow people to choose what food to buy. Photo: WFP/Farman Ali

An identical record of all messages on a blockchain is available to every participant (or ‘node’) on the blockchain, which can be many thousands or more. Because there are so many copies of the data on the blockchain network, it is exceedingly difficult for a would-be attacker to alter the records and falsify transactions. Should this happen, however, it would be immediately obvious that there has been an intrusion. This makes the blockchain much more secure than traditional, centralized systems, and renders its records unchangeable.

Shifting towards Cash-Based Assistance

In recent years, WFP has significantly scaled up its cash transfers. In areas where markets and services are well functioning, these transfers are often more effective and efficient at improving livelihoods. Not only do they allow recipients to choose which food to buy, they also inject much-needed cash into local economies. WFP’s Innovation Accelerator is therefore exploring approaches to delivering cash-based transfers in order to reduce costs and risks, while improving data protection and speeding up delivery.

From the Sandbox to the Field

The first, successful test at field level of WFP’s blockchain innovation — called ‘Building Blocks’ — was carried out in January deep in the heart of Sindh province, Pakistan. As vulnerable families received WFP food and cash assistance, the transactions were authenticated and recorded on a public blockchain through a smartphone interface. Transaction reports generated were then used to match the disbursements with entitlements.

Photo: WFP/Alexandra Alden

“Blockchain can revolutionize the way WFP delivers assistance to vulnerable families across the globe. It can bring us closer to the people we serve and allow us to respond much faster,” said Farman Ali, from the WFP Karachi provincial office.

Using the lessons learned in this first phase in Pakistan, WFP is now moving towards a full-scale pilot.

Immense Potential

Blockchain has the potential to allow faster intervention in some of the world’s most difficult environments. For example, in vulnerable countries lacking financial infrastructure, blockchain could help humanitarian actors roll out life-saving cash assistance in a matter of days when disasters strike.

Blockchains can be seen as a foundational technology akin to the internet, upon which many different applications can be built. Just as email was the first widespread application of the internet, payments have been the first widespread application of blockchains. And just as the internet rapidly expanded beyond email, blockchain applications have already expanded beyond payments. WFP is monitoring the scope for applications beyond cash-based transfers, identity management, and supply chain operations.

The full potential of blockchains can only be realized if all humanitarian actors collaborate around this platform. Republished from the World Food Programme blog on Medium.

***

Learn more about how WFP is harnessing the potential of blockchain technology to enhance our ability to provide effective, efficient assistance to the people we serve — and save millions of dollars.

Based in Munich, the Innovation Accelerator combines internal WFP staff with experts and entrepreneurs from across the private sector and civil society. Teams collaborate for three to six months on ideas that are either proposed by WFP innovators with first-hand field knowledge, or crowd-sourced by members of the public. For more information, contact: global.innovation@wfp.org.

The Accelerator is generously supported by a network of public and private partners and funded by the German Federal Foreign Office alongside the German Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development and the State of Bavaria.

Sunday, August 06, 2017

Discover the Truth about Indigenous Peoples

The Indigenous World in 2017

10th Anniversary UNDRIP Special Edition eBook

The International Work Group on Indigenous Affairs (IWGIA) has published Indigenous World 2017 which provides an update of the current situation for indigenous peoples worldwide and a comprehensive overview of the main global trends and developments affecting indigenous peoples during 2016.
 Download Indigenous World 2017

Download Indigenous World 2017 for Free

The Indigenous World 2017 comes in a special edition marking the ten years anniversary of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The public launch took place April 25, 2017 during the 16th session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues in New York.

Symbolically, it was launched on the same day, as the UN General Assembly marked the ten years anniversary of the adoption of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Highlights of Indigenous World 2017

Despite some encouraging national achievements, the country reports from around the world in this year’s edition continue to illustrate the great pressures facing indigenous communities at the local level.

If national policies are even available they are often not properly implemented, while in some countries national policies are in direct contradiction with international human rights obligations, including the UNDRIP and ILO Convention No. 169.

The country reports reiterate that the main challenges faced by indigenous peoples continue to be related to the recognition and implementation of their collective rights to lands, territories and resources, their access to justice, lack of consultation and consent, and the gross violations of their fundamental human rights.

The issue of extractive industries is once again a recurrent and overarching theme in the Indigenous World. Numerous examples show that both states and industries are repeatedly ignoring the key principle of Free, Prior and Informed Consent.

Mega infrastructure projects, investments in extractive industries and large-scale agriculture are increasingly posing a threat to the everyday life of indigenous peoples and their ability to maintain their land, livelihood and culture.

The year 2016 also witnessed an alarming rate of violence and discrimination of indigenous peoples and human rights defenders around the world.

On a global level, the implementation of the commitments adopted by UN member states at the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples (WCIP) continued at a slow but steady pace.

2016 also marked the first year of implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and, here, indigenous peoples continued their engagement. Within the area of climate change, the Paris Agreement, adopted in 2015, entered into force in November 2016, which was seen as a great success with regard to states’ commitments to combating climate change.

About the Book: The Indigenous World 2017 contains 59 detailed country reports and 12 articles on defining global processes in a total of 651 pages.

International Authorities

Over 70 distinguished experts, indigenous activists and scholars have contributed to the Indigenous World 2017. Among the contributors are Claire Charters, Patricia Borraz, Albert Barume, Stefan Disko, Joan Carling, Robert Hitchcock, Lola Garcia-Alix and many more.

All the contributors are identified by IWGIA on the basis of our knowledge and network. The contributors offer their expertise on a voluntary basis, which means that not all countries or all aspects of importance to indigenous peoples are included in the book.

Still, any omissions of specific country reports should not be interpreted as “no news is good news”. In fact, sometimes, it is the precarious human rights situation that makes it difficult to obtain articles from specific countries.

The book is published with support from the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs / Danida.

USE OF THE BOOK: It is IWGIA’s hope that indigenous peoples themselves and their organizations will find the Indigenous World 2017 useful in their advocacy work of improving indigenous peoples’ human rights situation. They may also, in this regard, find it inspiring for their work to read about the experiences of indigenous peoples in other countries and parts of the world.

It is also IWGIA’s wish and hope that the Indigenous World will be useful to a wider audience interested in indigenous issues and that it can be used as a reference book and a basis for obtaining further information on the situation of indigenous peoples worldwide.

The Indigenous World 2017 is, in that sense, an essential source of information and an indispensable tool or those who need to be informed about the most recent issues that impact on indigenous peoples worldwide. Article reformatted from IWGIA Website book reference. 

Article: States and industries still ignore the rights of indigenous peoples

Despite significant progress on global and regional level, indigenous peoples are left behind when it comes to recognition and protection of their right to land, territories and natural resources. This is the main conclusion of IWGIA’s 30th edition of the annual global report on indigenous peoples.

For ten years, indigenous peoples like the Maasai, Adivasi, Inuit and Quechua peoples have had their own UN declaration that commits States to promote, respect and protect indigenous peoples’ rights.

Still, the dignity and survival of the world’s 370 million indigenous people is under threat, as the global race for land and natural resources is increasing.

The Indigenous World 2017 provides an update of the current situation for indigenous peoples worldwide and a comprehensive overview of the main global trends and developments affecting indigenous peoples during 2016.

Focus on the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

The Indigenous World 2017 comes in a special edition marking the ten years anniversary of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

The public launch took place April 25 2017 during the 16th session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues in New York. Symbolically it was launched on the same day, as the UN General Assembly marked the ten years anniversary of the adoption of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Lola Garcia-Alix, co-director of IWGIA, says, “The adoption of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is a landmark. Still, action on the ground is really needed. Good intentions are simply not enough, as indigenous peoples lose lands and livelihoods every day.”

United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples provides a legal framework and an instrument for fulfilling the rights relating to indigenous peoples, including recognition of their right to self-determination, collective land rights, self-determined development, culture and more.

During its first ten years of existence, the Declaration has helped to shape laws, policies and programmes worldwide and continues to do so.

Consultations ignored in the global run for land and raw materials

Still, the realisation of the Declaration falls short in many parts of the world. Numerous examples show that both states and indus­tries are repeatedly ignoring the Declaration’s key principle of free, prior and informed consent. The principle is to protect indigenous peoples by including them in processes that affect their lands and lives.

Kathrin Wessendorf, co-director and coordinator of IWGIA’s climate programme says, “In the global race for acquiring land for industries and large-scale infrastructure projects, indigenous peoples and their rights are too often neglected. International companies and States should be concerned with this development and take responsibility. We call for joint action to realise the Declaration and ensure the dignity and survival of indigenous peoples.”

Development projects on indigenous lands continue to take place without consulting the people living on and from the affected land. And increasingly, energy projects and tourism threaten indigenous peoples to the same degree as construction of hy­droelectric dams, fossil fuel development, logging and agro-plantations do.

Shrinking space for indigenous activists

The year 2016 witnessed an alarming rate of violence and discrimination of in­digenous peoples and human rights defenders around the world.

Conflicts over land often lead to forced eviction and displacement of indigenous peoples. When defending their rights to land and territory, indigenous peoples risk being arrested, harassed, threatened and even murdered.

Lola Garcia-Alix says, “We condemn the use of threats, arrests and violence against indigenous peoples. Our hope is that by applying the principle of free, prior and informed consent and by generally respecting indigenous peoples’ rights, violent conflicts over land and resources will decrease in the future.”

For any further questions, please contact IWGIA's Press and Communications team: press@iwgia.org or +45 30749470.

Content re-published from IWGIA WebSite for Globcal International Network followers.

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Global Identity Principles (ID4D)

15 global organizations issue new principles for inclusive, secure identification in the developing world



In its ongoing effort to fight poverty, the World Bank has joined with a number of international partners, issuing a list of 10 key principles to ensure proper identification for citizens in the developing world, particularly with the aid of modern technology.

Entitled Principles on Identification for Sustainable Development: Towards a Digital Age, the new guidelines have been endorsed by a range of organizations from varying industries, including the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the United Nations Children’s Fund, and Mastercard.

The newly announced principles are part of a global effort to enable more inclusive and robust identification systems. The United Nations have targeted to provide legal identity for all, including birth registration, by 2030, and the guidelines look to help organizations do their part to achieve the UN’s Sustainable Development Goal.

“Given the size and complexity of the global identification gap, no single country, international organization, NGO, or private sector partner can surmount this challenge by working alone — coordination is needed at global, regional and national levels,” Vyjayanti Desai, ID4D program manager at World Bank Group, told One World Identity. “This effort is one step towards shaping a shared vision to advance progress globally.”


The list of 10 principles are broken in to three larger categories:
  • Inclusion, with the goal of universal coverage and accessibility
  • Design, aiming for robust, secure, responsive and sustainable methods of identity
  • Governance, building trust by protecting privacy and user rights
The principles were drawn up with the belief that every person has the right to participate fully in their society and economy. But full participation can be difficult without any verifiable proof of identity.
“No one should face the indignity of exclusion, nor be denied the opportunity to realize their full potential, exercise their rights, or share in progress,” the guidelines state. “No one should be left behind.”

Full details can be found in the full report, but the short list of 10 guiding principles are as follows:
  • Inclusion:
    • 1. Ensuring universal coverage for individuals from birth to death, free from discrimination.
    • 2. Removing barriers to access and usage and disparities in the availability of information and technology.
  • Design:
    • 3. Establishing a robust — unique, secure, and accurate — identity.
    • 4. Creating a platform that is inter-operable and responsive
      to the needs of various users.
    • 5. Using open standards and ensuring vendor and technology neutrality.
    • 6. Protecting user privacy and control through system design.
    • 7. Planning for financial and operational sustainability
      without compromising accessibility.
  • Governance:
    • 8. Safeguarding data privacy, security, and user rights through a comprehensive legal and regulatory framework.
    • 9. Establishing clear institutional mandates and accountability.
    • 10. Enforcing legal and trust frameworks though independent oversight and adjudication of grievances.
Republished from One World Identity (OWI) blog.

Sunday, February 12, 2017

United Nations Global Citizen Essay Contest

UN launches Many Languages for 2017, One World Student Essay Contest

Win a 10 day Expense Paid Trip to New York and meet the Secretary General


Minsk, 7 February (Belarus News) – The United Nations has launched the fourth edition of the Many Languages, One World Student Essay Contest, BelTA learned from the United Nations Department of Public Information in Belarus.

The United Nations Academic Impact, a program of the Outreach Division of the Department of Public Information, and ELS Educational Services invite full-time college and university students 18 years of age or older to take part in the fourth Many Languages, One World Student Essay Contest.

The essay must be 2,000 words or fewer and written in one of the official languages of the United Nations (English, Arabic, Spanish, Chinese, Russian, or French). It must discuss global citizenship and cultural understanding, and the role that multilingual ability can play in fostering these. The essay submission deadline is 16 March.

The winners will be invited to attend the 2017 Many Languages, One World Global Youth Forum to be hosted by Northeastern University. They will be awarded with an all-expense paid trip to Boston and New York City between 15-26 July 2017. The forum participants will present their views at the UN Headquarters in New York and create action plans related to the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Thursday, October 20, 2016

New UN Manual Empowers Indigenous Peoples

Empowerment through Sustainability

This is an important article for us to share with our readers because it creates international participatory engagement with potentially independent cultures and offers indigenous nations authority and rights over their territories. The problem we have detected is that indigenous peoples who fail to take up their rights and become sustainable through active stakeholder participation in the United Nations SDGs and Agenda 2030 risk being left behind and having their nation-state control their territories and operate in the stead of territorial concessions. Learn more about becoming a stakeholder in the United Nations Global Goals for Sustainable Development by becoming a member with Globcal International.

A new UN manual gives more say to indigenous peoples in development projects that affect them.

Download the UN Manual

10 October 2016 – The United Nations agricultural agency today unveiled a new manual that seeks to ensure that indigenous peoples, custodians of more than 80 per cent of global biodiversity, are able to freely give or deny their consent in development interventions that affect their natural resources or their way of life.

The UN Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) Manual on Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) outlines essential steps that should be followed so that Indigenous Peoples are able to participate in a manner that is free of coercion and with the necessary information in a development project – from its design to sharing its achievements after it has been completed – prior to any decisions having been made.

“None of us would allow someone to come to our home and start any activity of any kind without our agreement,” said Marcela Villarreal, Director of FAO Office for Partnerships, Advocacy and Capacity Building, in a news release today, explaining the concept of FPIC.

“It is shocking that in the 21st century, [there is an] underlying understanding that there are different rights for different human beings. […] This is de facto marginalization by dividing rights for first and second class citizens,” she added.

According to FAO, there are about 370 million indigenous individuals living in more than 90 countries, estimated to make up 75 percent of the world's cultural diversity and speaking well over half of the world's 7,000 surviving languages.

However, over the past decades, they have been facing mounting challenges related to their livelihoods, respect for their rights and spiritual beliefs, and access to lands, natural resources and territories.

Furthermore, mounting pressures from some extraction industries in some parts of the world are placing them at great peril.

FAO said today that a constant variable in all the actions that lead to forced displacement and destruction of their natural resources is the lack of respect for their FPIC right.

Datu Rico Pedecio, head of the Manobo Tribe in Leyte, Philippines. Following the devastation of typhoon Haiyan, the Manobo replanted valuable forest areas and gardens destroyed by the storms. Photo: FAO/Rommel Cabrera


The right of Indigenous Peoples to FPIC has also been acknowledged in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, adopted by the General Assembly in September 2007.

Indigenous knowledge vital for sustainable development

The importance of indigenous peoples' traditional knowledge systems and their contributions to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), as well as in combatting climate change is receiving greater attention.

This point was noted by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon in his address to the Arctic Circle Assembly this weekend. FAO also highlighted this importance.

In today's news release, speaking specifically on food security and combatting malnutrition, the agency noted: “Indigenous Peoples' food systems can help the rest of humanity expand its narrow food base, currently reliant on only a small set of staple crops.”

“Additionally, by protecting forest resources, many indigenous communities help mitigate the negative impacts of climate change,” it added.

Publisher's Note: This article was published from the United Nations News Center to inform our members of current activities and opportunities with the United Nations. The information in the article presented may not be valid for all indigenous nations or tribes because of current government or state treaties with some tribes as dependents, it may be necessary for those who are subject citizens or national residents to organize cooperative businesses that can enable them to operate independently to overcome their nation or state with understanding. Those interested in developing balanced international authority and claiming their international rights under the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples should contact Globcal International to learn how to become more autonomous and sovereign to represent themselves better within the international theater.
  

Tuesday, October 18, 2016

New Partnership Financing for SDGs

UN leader announces launch of new partnership platform to support financing for the Sustainable Development Goals

At UN Headquarters, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon addresses the High-level meeting on Financial Solutions for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). UN Photo/Amanda Voisard

10 October 2016 – Announcing the launch today of a new platform for scaling up innovative finance solutions to support the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said the initiative can help in identifying and piloting innovative finance instruments that can drive investment and support well thought-out SDG interventions.


“Financial actors and institutions are already beginning to develop solutions for attracting private capital in support of the 2030 Agenda [for Sustainable Development],” Mr. Ban told a meeting with high-level officials from Ministries of finance and foreign affairs, together with leaders from major global financial institutions at UN Headquarters today.

Titled 'Financial solutions for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs),' the gathering showcased the initiatives and examples from around the world on how best business and the financial services sector can engage in the SDG process and transform markets.

Mr. Ban said that the proposed multi-stakeholder Financial Innovation Platform would support the identification and piloting of innovative finance instruments, and would engage key development actors, including Governments, civil society, philanthropic organizations, entrepreneurs, institutional investors, banks, project developers and development finance institutions.


Mr. Ban, who will step down as the top UN official when his tenure ends on 31 December, expressed hope that the Platform will provide the best possible know-how to support the efforts by the incoming Secretary-General.

“Sustainability and stability of the financial system are mutually reinforcing,” he said, emphasizing the importance of reorienting existing financial flows to sustainable objectives so that investors will reap the benefits in the form of secure markets and thriving consumers.

That is why Governments, gathering in Addis Ababa in July 2015, adopted an an action agenda aimed at creating policy and regulatory environments that provide incentives for long-term and sustainable investments, he added.


According to Mr. Ban, the financial sector, spearheaded by companies such as Aviva, is promoting the creation of international benchmarks while the World Bank Treasury Office is issuing innovative financial instruments that are generating new investment opportunities.

Efforts are now needed to build on these initiatives, and the United Nations can play “a catalytic role” and intends to create a venue where leaders from all sectors, including government, can join forces, learn from each other and align their actions for greater collective effect, the Secretary-General said.

Many new ideas and solutions are already in play. International Housing Solutions, a global private equity investor, is using both catalytic and commercial capital investors to make green homes affordable to a wide population in Sub-Saharan Africa. CEO Michael Falcone said at the meeting that the creation of a UN platform will help to expand affordable green homes across the region.

“We are engaged in nothing less than the transformation of global capital markets,” said Mark Wilson, Group CEO of Aviva, an international insurance and investment company. “That demands major change. “If business isn't sustainable then society is at risk and if society isn't sustainable then business is at risk. So it's just enlightened self-interest for business to support the SDGs,” he said.


"While there are many pathways forward to achieve the SDGs, one thing is clear: business as usual is not an option to close the $2.5 trillion annual funding gap in developing countries alone," said Judith Rodin, President, The Rockefeller Foundation. "To realize the SDGs we need to foster a new era of collaboration and coordination, and the UN Secretary-General has unprecedented convening power to do this by bringing together leaders from different sectors,” she stressed.

The concept of a new multi-stakeholder forum to help finance progress on the Goals emerged following the 2015 Financing for Development Conference that took place in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. At that Conference, world leaders called for creative and innovative solutions by the private sector to scale-up investments in activities that contribute to the sustainable development.

It is now clear to many in the finance sector, that there are new demands of the marketplace as well as shareholders seeking sustainable investments. This is why a new framework for sustainable investing is needed. The know-how that is being made available within the finance sector will be shared and made accessible: the platform will accelerate solutions and encourage scale up.

For more information and to receive regular updates about the United Nations and the Sustainable Development Goals please subscribe to my personal Google News feed or you can subscribe to Globcal International's United Nations SDGs official syndicated feed. 

Monday, September 05, 2016

Align your Business with the SDGs

Is Your Business Aligned with the U.N. Sustainable Development Goals?

By Clinton Moloney and Don Reed, Triple Pundit Correspondents

2015 was a pivotal year in turning the tide on major sustainability issues. One of the key drivers of this shift was the release of the United Nations’ (U.N.) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) last fall, aimed to propel the business community and the whole world to align their corporate strategies to help make real progress on social, economic and environmental issues for years to come.

The 17 SDGs make up a cohesive environmental and social sustainability vision that serves as a call-to-action for governments, civil society, and businesses to rethink their core strategies, missions and values and contribute to these goals in an overall effort to have positive, lasting contributions to our quality of life and our planet.

Everyone within a civil society agrees with the 17 basic goals.

The SDGs will function as a vehicle that will allow businesses to find the intersection between where they can contribute to society and their core business values and purpose. And at a fundamental level, a business that is operating in a way that is aligned to solving major societal challenges will be more resilient over the long term. Companies are usually clear on the positive impacts they’re already having on society. The SDGs offer a new lens to look at and communicate the social issues they currently have the most bearing on, and where they may fall short.

Global expectations are already high for the SDGs, but what about the perception among U.S. businesses? For one, there’s a high awareness level among U.S. corporations – recent PwC research found that more than 90 percent of businesses are familiar with the SDGs. Moreover, companies are already considering their own impact on the SDGs with some 40 percent planning to conduct an annual review to assess that impact.

Businesses have a real opportunity to turn the complexity of the global goals as part of their overall corporate strategy. But what are the best practices and processes for supporting the SDGs and kicking off the process of embedding them into their fundamental business framework?

We’ve identified four key steps companies need to take to commence successful engagement with the SDGs:
Determine the impact your business and its value chain have on each of the SDGs, both directly and indirectly. Governments may have different priorities for the SDGs, so for global companies, it’s critical to understand in detail each country’s priorities where business operates.

Agree on the methodology and measure your business impact across all these SDGs. Data and analytics can help you understand where your business has a positive or negative impact on each SDG. There are tools available that can help provide total impact measurement.

Incorporate the learnings from your measurement into business planning and strategy to prioritize reducing negative impacts and increasing the positive. This will lead to the ability to prove your role in the SDGs.
Communicate your business goals and achievements consistently with the SDGs. Outside of sustainability reports, these impacts should be integrated into overall company communications such as annual reports, SEC filings and customer communications.

Many companies are looking to adopt the goals that are the most relevant to their businesses and where they can contribute the most to society, as well as areas where they are able to engage their stakeholders. For example, a pharmaceutical company may concentrate on good health and well-being (goal No. 3), while a major consumer brand that targets female retailers may start with its impact on women and equality (No. 5).

Aligning specific SDGs to business growth strategy works well as long as companies understand where they have impacts across all the goals – positive or negative – and can gain a complete perspective of their sustainability opportunities. And after corporations get a handle on communicating the issues where they already have known business value and positive impact in SDG terms, they can move on to uncover new opportunities to have an impact in other areas.

Making a smooth transition to this new model where SDGs play a central role in operational considerations as well as planning, reporting and strategy could make all the difference in helping to achieve the SDGs.

Image credit: United Nations

Clinton Moloney is PwC’s U.S. Sustainable Business Solutions Advisory Leader
Don Reed is a Managing Director in PwC’s U.S. Sustainable Business Solutions Practice

Tuesday, August 30, 2016

New Global Human Identity Standards

New Global Identity Standards World-Wide

This year the World Economic Forum (WEF) with the collaboration of many well known and many not so well known corporate and nongovernmental organizations devised a new road map (blueprint) this month for the global financial community to utilize here-forth for everyone's mutual benefit and financial protection beyond our borders to establish a universal (global) identity verification system.

Security Document World said, "In the report, the WEF calls on financial institutions to lead the charge in developing robust digital identity solutions that would bring benefits to users, financial institutions, and society as a whole."

Lots of New Articles

Digital biometric scanner, soon to be very commonplace at international ports.
Over the last several weeks we have seen a great increase in the number of news articles being presented involving identity, biometric identification, digital banking and new governmental identification programs on our 'Human Rights and Identity' news feed. In the United States last week the government began to require biometric (digital) photo identification (Real ID) at government facilities including all military bases and institutional centers.

The United Nations with the World Bank announced late last year the ID4D, Identification for Development program which promises that they will work to help see that every human being on the planet has an identity by 2020. Since 2014 over 50 new multi-million corporations have quietly emerged globally to work and contract their innovative services and products for banks, people and governments.

Perhaps you have heard of some of the larger well-known corporations and global players that are being recognized as leaders of the new identification industry; PayPal, Deloitte, Unisys, Experian, Caribou Digital, Facebook, and Consent are working together as a consortium of corporations in these innovations right now. The United States and United Kingdom governments also have great interests and involvement in pushing forward and creating the new identity industries that will have an annual value in the hundreds of billions of dollars per year.
MeReal Cards private secure fool-proof biometrics.

Human Identity Revolution

Taking the lead in the human identity revolution in recent years has not been the United States but surprisingly is India, Pakistan, Honduras, Ecuador and Brazil who are all using digital biometric elements for human identification at their borders and in airports.

Between now and 2020, as a research analyst, I can safely speculate that there will 300,000+ universal identity verification terminals will be installed in airports, border crossings, checkpoints, and sea ports around the world accepting over 1000 different passports and electronic access credentials. Within the industry many anticipate many new emerging states and jurisdictions all using high tech credentials. All people including diplomats identity will be referenced in the global system based on their legal credentials.

Nation-states will not be the sole providers of identification, the corporations listed above are as integral in the system as the government once was and so are companies like Coca-Cola, Google, IBM, WWF, and other transnational global corporations and organizations with special international employment credentials, services and protection.

Changing the System after 83 Years

Many people do not realize but it has only been since about 1933 that nations have been fully involved in collecting data, claiming people and registering their citizens as assets. Only now citizens, (people) of all types will become more versatile (free?) in to whom 'they choose' to serve as citizens, demonstrating self-determination and taking on their social responsibility as residents of a country or place, which is in essence what citizenship is all about anyway. It is a whole new ball game under our true human rights!

Non-National Blockchain Identification

It is suggested that neither the government or state can be trusted with our identity and several years ago people began to experiment with encrypted digital block-chains online that are like indelible electronic ink.

Many people are betting the revolution will be dominated by non-national blockchain registries of confidential encrypted data based on a similar system as Bitcoin. Recently we witnessed the rollout of Bitnation Pangaea which offers a comfortable solution for those who wish to protect their privacy. Their system allows for contract registration, notarization of documents and marriages.

A recent article from 'themerkle' identifies four blockchain companies focusing on secure digital identity solutions. The companies named in the article are Evernym, Blockstack Labs, KYC-Chain, and UniquID, all the companies have clear developments and niches staked out.

There will be private, dual, multi-national, corporate, university, cooperative, organizational and nation-state citizenships; I imagine that the transitional period to acquire all of our human rights will strangely enough all compete for our allegiance as their human capital and all have a hand in defining our identity in an official way.

Understanding the new system is hard to imagine until you understand the new emergent law based on the (new) Universal Declaration of Human Rights and place yourself at sea (stateless) without any citizenship. Our concept resolves the problem of finding a place to land your ship based on the law, your knowledge, education, experience, abilities and asset value as a human being within our cooperative or in your identity as a global citizen instead of a refugee or stateless person. The best thing about our stateless neocitizenship development is that it utilizes other accepted systems as our base.

Rapid Change Ahead

From the great advancement and progress we currently see in government use of biometric identification, we should expect that all nations and territories will soon meet the new international requirements within the next five years. Governments in some countries already restrict access to national and state parks, top organizations around the world have special biometric digital identification for their executive and volunteer assets.

The new industry-focused documents we found online this week reveal great new opportunities and outstanding potential for entrepreneurs with ideals to create both soft, medium and hard identification systems. However the way the industry is developed there will be little chance to enter the horizontal global market so would-be market developers and thinkers need to decide which floor they want to begin with.

"New entrants into this space will have to navigate a layer that may look like a sandwich filling between two slices of bread, one being Facebook’s (at the moment) light verification identity platform and the other being any state-led identity platform—in other words, at both ends of the spectrum there are incumbents which will be difficult to compete against."

"Advancements in biometrics, encryption, and distributed computing are leading to sophisticated technology solutions and new business models for managing digital identity. But again we must emphasize that while the technology is easy to focus on, the 'analog complements' in this sector—the regulatory environments, political structures, cultural attitudes, and more—are just as critical for success, especially given their diversity across different markets."

Banking Technology and Safety

It does not stop here, people that need to use money and the financial system will be able to use their natural biometric indicators like fingerprints, iris scans, cards with microchips, cellular smartphones, or passports and other identity devices. The financial sector is the strongest component behind personal identity verification and international security, they are insisting on biometrics.

The more that is known about the things that occur in our civil societies and civilization bring safety and security to the law abiding and good people that we all want to be. The ideals regarding identity, human taxonomy, corporate citizenship, and migration being implemented today will revolutionize life on the planet and how we perceive ourselves as human beings. It will make sustainability a reality, reduce corruption and make life more accountable.

Follow this subject by following our Human Identity News Feed, new stories daily! Globcal International provides access to a variety of news feeds to our members and the public to know the current trends and adapt with the changes ahead.

Monday, August 15, 2016

World Humanitarian Day

August 19th: An International Observance for Humanity

World Humanitarian Day (WHD) is held every year on 19 August to pay tribute to aid workers who risk their lives in humanitarian service, and to mobilize people to advocate for a more humane world. The day was designated by the General Assembly of the United Nations seven years ago to coincide with the anniversary of the 2003 bombing of the United Nations headquarters in Baghdad, Iraq. This World Humanitarian Day, the UN and its partners are calling for global solidarity with the more than 130 million people around the world who need humanitarian assistance to survive.

As a goodwill ambassador working with these concepts and programs everyday, I perceive World Humanitarian Day as special because it gives us some valuable tools to mobilize people to come together as one. World Humanitarian Day highlights the World Humanitarian Summit which took place in Istanbul, Turkey, in May 2016. World leaders came together to declare their collective support for the new "Agenda for Humanity", which emphasizes some important areas where we can do better, and what we can do. Therefore, the World Humanitarian Summit was an important step on our common way to a better, more humane future. 


The theme of World Humanitarian Day 2016 is One Humanity. Source: United Nations

2016 Theme: One Humanity

The theme of World Humanitarian Day 2016 is “One Humanity”. We are confronting some of the greatest challenges of our time and we are all one humanity sharing our responsibilities. Not only the world leaders, but also each one of us, need to commit to these responsibilities for the sake of humanity.




In the digital quiz "The World You'd Rather" users will be confronted with challenging choices. Source: United Nations.

Digital campaign will bring to light the very real scenarios faced by people in crisis.

The WHD digital campaign “The World You’d Rather” will launch on 19 August. Featuring a quiz based on the popular game “Would you rather”, the digital campaign will bring to light the very real scenarios faced by people in crisis. After being confronted with challenging choices, users will be able to share a personalized graphic on social media, tweet their world leader and learn about the Agenda for Humanity.

Activities for World Humanitarian Day

In New York, a special event will be held at the General Assembly of the United Nations on 19 August from 6:30 to 9:00 pm. Hala Kalim and her four children, who were featured in the documentary “Children of Syria”, will attend. Alongside talented musicians and high-level speakers, they will tell their story of the impossible choices they faced living in and fleeing Syria through four short films. A wreath laying ceremony will be held on 19 August at the Visitors’ Entrance at UN Headquarters to honor the aid workers who lost their lives in humanitarian service.

A virtual reality film, “Home”, will be launched on 19 August, which documents the United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s travels to the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Jordan, Lebanon and South Sudan as part of his “Mission for Humanity”. On the day, the Secretary-General will also release a video statement on the Day and OCHA (United Nations Office for the coordination of Humanitarian Affairs) will launch a three-minute film on this year’s WHD.

What we all can do?

World Humanitarian Day is a day for everyone to come together and take action for a safer and more humane world for the communities affected by crisis and the people who devote their lives to helping them.

Here are a few ways you can get involved:

  • Learn about the Agenda for Humanity and the core responsibilities.
  • Use the #sharehumanity hashtag to advocate for the Agenda for Humanity and the more than 130 million people affected by crisis.
  • Attend or organize a WHD event on 19 August.

Agenda for Humanity - Core Responsibilities

The United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has called for humanity – people’s safety, dignity and the right to thrive – to be placed at the heart of global decision-making. To deliver for humanity, stakeholders must act on the core responsibilities seen in the illustrations below.


"In a world that is ever more digitally connected, each of us has the power and responsibility to inspire our fellow human beings to act to help others and create a more humane world."


- UN Secretary-General, Ban Ki-moon, for World Humanitarian Day 2016





























Core responsibilities in the Agenda for Humanity. Source: United Nations.


For this World Humanitarian Day, let us all come together as one humanity. Let us realize what kind of reality our fellow humans live in and show some solidarity. We don’t all need to make big efforts, but if each one of us does a small act for a more humane world, our collective efforts will make a change.

Article by: Maria Veneke Ylikomi, Goodwill Ambassador, Globcal International

Monday, June 06, 2016

Pros and Cons of Global Citizenship

Global Citizenship: A Diverse Concept

Now that the world has begun to change (radically and quickly) with the new globalization movement of a corporate world based on best practices, transparency, accountability and credibility to foster the ideal world we want to see under the ideals of a sustainable planet with the United Nations and the Global Goals; the role of the human being and our identity is also being redefined.

On April 18th, 2016 the Universal Declaration on Human Rights was revised and improved to meet the needs of the human being and our role as the residents of the planet and the Global Citizenship Commission was introduced to expand our rights as human beings and participants of a healthy planet.

"We belong to the earth, the earth does not belong to us!" -Ambassador Col. David J. Wright

DPI/NGO Conference on Global Citizenship held in Korea

A global education action agenda affirming the importance of Sustainable Development Goal 4 – ensuring inclusive and equitable quality education and promoting lifelong opportunities for all – was adopted in Gyeongju, Republic of Korea.

Speaking from the podium at the 66th United Nations Department of Public Information (DPI)/Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) Conference, Ms. Cristina Gallach, UN Under-Secretary-General for Communications and Public Information, said “This Conference has demonstrated another example of the value for the United Nations in investing in partnership with academia and NGOs.”

The Gyeongju Action Plan provides concrete guidance for NGOs around the world to enhance their ability to lobby governments to commitment to implementing the Sustainable Sustainable Development Goals and mobilize NGOs in communities on the ground.

“The United Nations is committed to continue to support and partner with NGOs and academia in our joint efforts to advocate for and successfully implement the 2030 Agenda,” Ms. Gallach continued.

The newly adopted Action Plan includes a series of concrete measures for NGOs around the world to jump-start implementation of the 2030 Agenda at the grass roots level.

Dr. Scott Carlin, Conference Co-chair and Associate Professor of Geography at Long Island University, said “NGOs from around the world brought passion and expertise to lively final consultations on the outcome document. We are grateful for all of the inputs received and very proud of the Gyeongju Action Plan.”

“We hope that Gyeongju was an inspirational setting for finalizing a truly unifying action plan that will be useful for NGOs, wherever they are working,” added Co-Chair Dr.Yukang Choi.

First Youth Declaration

For the first time in the history of the DPI/NGO Conference, youth also developed and issued a Youth Declaration.

Ms. Gallach pointed out that youth had “come in great numbers, demonstrating the value that they see in partnering with the United Nations.”

Ahmad Alhendawi, the Secretary-General's Envoy on Youth, noted “the Conference not only reinforced the critical role of NGOs to achieve a vision for the 2030 Agenda, but also stressed the urgency for greater investments in education for Global Citizenship to unlock the potential of this massive generation of children and youth.”

“Unfortunately youth are still not involved enough in policy making processes around the world,” said Ms. Saphira Rameshfar, representative of the Baha'i Community and Conference youth leader.

“The Youth Declaration is a necessary reminder that young people are needed as leaders and decision-makers not only in youth forums and special-purpose councils, but in those spaces where the course and direction of society as a whole are determined,” added Ms. Rameshfar.

The Action Plan was drafted through a global multi-stakeholder consultation process, leading up to, and during the conference. It was adopted at the Conference's final plenary session and will be shared widely with civil society as well as the UN Secretary-General, the UN System, Member States and learning communities.

Related Articles

There are a number of relative articles and ideals that can be investigated and explored that justify the ideal world where fairness and collective prosperity can be understood. Please delve into them and learn more about our future as global citizens.

DPI/NGO Global Citizenship Conference Highlights (video summary on Facebook)
Conference Action Plan
Ban Ki-moon's Statements from the Conference

Friday, October 30, 2015

Cooperative Registry of Global Citizens

Certificate of State Ownership
(Personal Birth Certificate)
Our ideals of citizenship and who we should serve as individuals in a civil sense are getting an upgrade over the next five years. As I have confirmed there are speculators and social engineers at the heart of this meddling with human rights and changing how to better exploit human capitalism.

New Registry Collaborates the UN SDGs

The projects of the United Nations SDGs (Global Goals) have come center stage and become the new fuel for the global mainstream. The goals have immersed all our nations, religious institutions, corporations, and political systems to universally agree to make our priority the adoption and implementation of these 17 common goals on a global scale through international cooperation, corporate cooperation, and our independent national policy to become sustainable.

On September 25th at the UN Headquarters in New York City all of the world leaders (193 of them) agreed to the SDGs (Sustainable Development Goals). At the same time they discussed and made the ideal of global citizenship a reality for those who work and live internationally.

For as long as we have known, we have always been citizens of our states or nations making us distinctly different based on our place of origin more than race. Through globalization by international corporations (entrusted through their nations) the nation as an entity has become smaller and less powerful than its own corporate citizens. Now the playing field of our civil society model and reality 'opens up again' with the SDGs and the facilitation of the world meeting the 17 Global Goals.

So now today the ideal has become to allow the corporate bodies operated and or founded by the masses (people like you and me) control and operate the planet as corporate global citizens under a strict set of laws that govern the ecosystem and economy which are becoming one in the same. It's a good deal for the United States where 41% of the 200 greatest world economies including nations, are controlled by 82 US corporations. They need to be nice and diplomatic though because China is a major US stakeholder in everything, they always have been even before they loaned 14 trillion to the US in 2008 and 2009.

A Registry of Global Citizens

Based on learning how wrong some of these ideals could end up for us humans who are not corporations and dislike the ideals of global capitalism, we became inspired to become the meek who shall inherit earth through a cooperative development involving global citizenship and personal identification, it all begins with the first official registry for those digital citizens who are non-aligned politically with their countries that want to take on global citizenship.

We began the development of a neutral non-governmental civil registry in mid-2013 preparing for the next step in the evolution of our global civil society beyond the Millennium Development Goals which were thus-far successful in their scope, to further prepare for the new next steps (SDG)s in globalizing our homo-ecologically sustainable idealism (consciousness) among one another, which begins now on January 01, 2016.

We developed the registry as a way for people to duly declare that they are global citizens and that wish to be recognized with global citizenship not-withstanding their country or political state of origin based on their personal social, academic and digital identity. Global citizens must declare that they are politically neutral (non-aligned) and share in the philosophy of the the ideals of global, universal, and or world citizenship. Signing the registry does not require a person to renounce their civil, state, or national citizenship which is protected by the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

On October 9th the registry began to inscribe names of those who wish to become known as global citizens in service to all of mankind and the planet, rather than only from within their country of residence. The application form is very simple and straight forward, all those who join will receive a certificate, a registry identification number, and will be invited to participate in the formation of a new international global citizenship cooperative as an offshore charitable international foundation.

The cooperative formation initiative promises transparency, integrity, and accountability in creating social responsibility and sustainability among its members and those who participate within the program. Equality in democratic consensus, equal investment, equal participation, and equal opportunity. One person, one share, one voice, one vote!

To better understand the ideal and benefits of our programs please follow our blog and see some of our previous articles. To sign the registry to become a global citizen now, click here.

Friday, October 23, 2015

Taking Measures to Assist Europe's New Residents

Globcal International is an organization that takes a very serious view on all matters relative to human rights and our great civilization. Currently we are involved in the development of a global program involving citizenship alternatives for those who have been marginalized by the system, those who live and work internationally, and for those who have had enough of the day-in-day-out nation-state politics based in envy, plunder, racism, and greed resulting in societies that were built on discrimination and nationalism (most national governments).

Preparing Europe for Global Citizenship

Goodwill Ambassadors Karen Cantrell and
Antonino Landi meeting in Palermo, Sicily 
Over the past 20 years those responsible for the changes that are occurring in our society (people like you, me and others) have been focused on creating a global society that is rooted in fairness, best practices, equality, peace and sustainability. We have all had our ideals challenged by organizations influenced by their sponsors seeking an advantage over these horizons including religious institutions and nation-states that seek to possess and control the world, its riches, people and their advantage through corrupt controls.

In late September we took on and adopted a 'new deal' with new goals proposed by world leaders who unanimously agreed at the United Nations under the framework of a 15 year plan to revolutionize our great civilization eliminating poverty, bringing equality to humanity, and saving the planet from global warming and climate change. They labelled the world-wide program the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG)s for those who work within the framework and nicknamed the project the Global Goals.

Our organization is delighted with the Global Goals as a way to bring equality to our planet and the people who inhabit it; however there are many issues and a great deal of resistance from those who want to retain their brute force control over the humanity. The pain and toil that built their nations over the years combined with organizations and corporations corruptly invested in country economies are at the helm of the disagreements. Despite the resistance of the shift toward a globalized world, the world leaders including monarchs and those elected democratically have all (193 of 196) agreed to the changes proposed by the 17 SDGs with 169 prime targets over the next 15 years.

Clearing the Way for Refugee and Migration Services

In an effort to better prepare our projects for implementation and development we had to take a first hand look to examine the crisis situations around the world especially those which involve discrimination. To accomplish this we needed to depend on our ambassadors in Europe to provide their first hand experience with the refugee crisis there. Coincidentally our goodwill ambassador, Princess Karen Cantrell traveled to Europe on October 13 and has taken time to meet with other Globcal International ambassadors regarding the refugee and migration issue.

Ambassador Cantrell is an executive council member and co-founder of Globcal International, she is the key person in the administration and development of the Hospitallers Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem (HOSLJ), a philanthropic charity and priory of the Roman Catholic Church located in the United States. During her trip she has shared some critical viewpoints and first hand knowledge relative to the refugee crisis in an effort to provide Globcal International better understanding over the issue.

When leaving Germany where she noted some discrimination against arriving Syrian refugees, she went to consult with our volunteer representative for Italy, Ambassador Antonino Landi in Palermo, Sicily to discuss the refugee crisis and to justify an aspect within the formation of our global citizenship project especially for refugees and their families.

Ambassador Cantrell reported that; "there was a great deal of debate and misgiving," she witnessed, "first hand a great deal of discrimination, but also a great deal of pro-refugee awareness and activism." She said in closing, "Germany is run by people with great minds and they have accepted this enormous social responsibility when others have turned their heads. Chancellor Merkel has stood fast on this issue and has the support of the majority of the German people. Those who fear a takeover have to live with their narrow mindedness and discriminatory nationalist ideals." She also cited the example of the Turkish wave of immigration years ago which has turned out historically to be very beneficial to the country's economy and the betterment of the society in general.

Including Everyone in the Global Agenda

After careful review of international law all the recent immigrants to Europe each and all possess particular human rights as refugees under the United Nations and may potentially become new global citizens under the Globcal International program based on the updated development of our project as soon as this January.