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Showing posts with label Global Goals. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Global Goals. Show all posts

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Global Goals serve as a Doorway to the Future

Making the Universal Agenda Truly Universal

Director of the Sustainable Development Goals Fund

NEW YORK, Nov 17 2016 (IPS) - One of the key features of the 2030 Agenda which the United Nations and member states identified in the lead up to the SDG agreement was the principle of universality.

After managing to get the pivotal agreement on the global framework for the new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) agreed upon last year, it is now critical to continue this momentum and understand the opportunities and challenges it creates for the private sector as partners in sustainable development efforts.

Building on our interest to tip the scales and generate greater private sector engagement, the UN Sustainable Development Goals Fund (SDG Fund) in collaboration with its Private Sector Advisory Group and the Global Compact examined these questions through a new report, Universality and the SDGs: A Business Perspective. The report, launched last week highlights varied perspectives from both large and small companies working to understand the commonality of the new development agenda.

Universality in this context is defined by the UN as “applicable to all countries, while taking into account different national realities, capacities and levels of development that respect national policies and principles.” Thus the notion of Universality also envisions that everyone has a role to play in development and poverty alleviation efforts framing the development agenda.

The business community has, and continues to be deemed an important partner for us, serving as a critical economic engine and multiplier to catalyze economic and social development programs in our 23 joint programs around the world. The task at hand is to now reinforce this commitment and ensure that companies of all sizes and sectors are properly aware of the new SDGs.

To this end, the outcomes of the report were based on a year-long series of workshops and dialogues and reflected input from over 100 firms across a variety of regions and industry sectors. These findings stemming from countless interviews and in-depth questions were not unexpected and mainly in-line with our experience at the SDG Fund. We found that companies were keen to address the new set of goals which they viewed as critical to their core business activities, but many firms still struggled to fully understand the depth of the goals.

The report also mirrored some of our unique experience working with the private sector. For example, while many firms are already working in areas linked to the SDGs, this work is not always associated with the same “UN” or development language. In fact, many companies articulate the “global goals” using other mechanisms, including using other metrics or reporting based on environmental, social and corporate governance (ESG) indicators or other industry standards.

The new report offers some other useful findings. First, companies both small and large are increasingly aware of the concept of the SDGs, but many firms did not fully grasp the intricacies of the SDGs in context of their work or internal operations.

In addition, although many companies find a clear and added value to framing sustainability initiatives through the SDGs which provide a unified set of globally accepted principles–many companies are still accustomed to working within the confines of their philanthropic and CSR programs.

Despite a strong willingness to embrace the SDGs, many companies are exploring how to best integrate the SDGs into their work. But perhaps the most compelling case for the SDG Fund’s continued efforts to engage companies in a “co-design, co-invest and co-implement policy” is that the private sector remains eager to work on global challenges.

Companies continue to express their desire to be brought into the process to build innovative and robust multi-stakeholder partnerships at the local level and very often with UN partners.

Undoubtedly, with the one-year anniversary of the 2030 agenda approaching in January, this new report reminds us that the UN can and should play a more active role in educating and informing companies on the “universal” dimensions of the SDGs.

It is also important to continue to translate the new agenda into language and simplified reporting metrics that are palatable for businesses of all sizes – all of which means greater education on how companies can integrate the SDGs in their value chains, disseminate accessible resources and tools to promote learning, and support implementation and alignment across sectors.

In the end, the universality principle embedded in the SDGs provides a clear invitation for action and alignment to advance the new development agenda.

We hope to continue to raise public awareness and foster the much needed dialogue and advocacy required to encourage business to support the SDGs. In addition, our report highlights additional information on the ongoing work of the SDG Fund, including Private Sector Advisory Group case studies that continue to build the case for greater engagement in development, especially across sectors and with welcome actors like the private sector.

Source: -IPSNews

Thursday, October 20, 2016

New UN Manual Empowers Indigenous Peoples

Empowerment through Sustainability

This is an important article for us to share with our readers because it creates international participatory engagement with potentially independent cultures and offers indigenous nations authority and rights over their territories. The problem we have detected is that indigenous peoples who fail to take up their rights and become sustainable through active stakeholder participation in the United Nations SDGs and Agenda 2030 risk being left behind and having their nation-state control their territories and operate in the stead of territorial concessions. Learn more about becoming a stakeholder in the United Nations Global Goals for Sustainable Development by becoming a member with Globcal International.

A new UN manual gives more say to indigenous peoples in development projects that affect them.

Download the UN Manual

10 October 2016 – The United Nations agricultural agency today unveiled a new manual that seeks to ensure that indigenous peoples, custodians of more than 80 per cent of global biodiversity, are able to freely give or deny their consent in development interventions that affect their natural resources or their way of life.

The UN Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) Manual on Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) outlines essential steps that should be followed so that Indigenous Peoples are able to participate in a manner that is free of coercion and with the necessary information in a development project – from its design to sharing its achievements after it has been completed – prior to any decisions having been made.

“None of us would allow someone to come to our home and start any activity of any kind without our agreement,” said Marcela Villarreal, Director of FAO Office for Partnerships, Advocacy and Capacity Building, in a news release today, explaining the concept of FPIC.

“It is shocking that in the 21st century, [there is an] underlying understanding that there are different rights for different human beings. […] This is de facto marginalization by dividing rights for first and second class citizens,” she added.

According to FAO, there are about 370 million indigenous individuals living in more than 90 countries, estimated to make up 75 percent of the world's cultural diversity and speaking well over half of the world's 7,000 surviving languages.

However, over the past decades, they have been facing mounting challenges related to their livelihoods, respect for their rights and spiritual beliefs, and access to lands, natural resources and territories.

Furthermore, mounting pressures from some extraction industries in some parts of the world are placing them at great peril.

FAO said today that a constant variable in all the actions that lead to forced displacement and destruction of their natural resources is the lack of respect for their FPIC right.

Datu Rico Pedecio, head of the Manobo Tribe in Leyte, Philippines. Following the devastation of typhoon Haiyan, the Manobo replanted valuable forest areas and gardens destroyed by the storms. Photo: FAO/Rommel Cabrera


The right of Indigenous Peoples to FPIC has also been acknowledged in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, adopted by the General Assembly in September 2007.

Indigenous knowledge vital for sustainable development

The importance of indigenous peoples' traditional knowledge systems and their contributions to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), as well as in combatting climate change is receiving greater attention.

This point was noted by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon in his address to the Arctic Circle Assembly this weekend. FAO also highlighted this importance.

In today's news release, speaking specifically on food security and combatting malnutrition, the agency noted: “Indigenous Peoples' food systems can help the rest of humanity expand its narrow food base, currently reliant on only a small set of staple crops.”

“Additionally, by protecting forest resources, many indigenous communities help mitigate the negative impacts of climate change,” it added.

Publisher's Note: This article was published from the United Nations News Center to inform our members of current activities and opportunities with the United Nations. The information in the article presented may not be valid for all indigenous nations or tribes because of current government or state treaties with some tribes as dependents, it may be necessary for those who are subject citizens or national residents to organize cooperative businesses that can enable them to operate independently to overcome their nation or state with understanding. Those interested in developing balanced international authority and claiming their international rights under the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples should contact Globcal International to learn how to become more autonomous and sovereign to represent themselves better within the international theater.
  

Friday, August 26, 2016

Human Empowerment through Cooperation

Making the Cooperative the Ideal Business Model

The ideal of the 'cooperative' was first developed in the 1820s, long before privately held corporations by individuals, based on the development of the free and fair exchange of legally held assets through common ownership of a business or distribution system designed to benefit its members who collectively own the institution as a society. The non-profit and for profit co-operative embodiment today has become a solid institutional part of the corporate laws of many countries while in other countries that depend on the concept of international cooperation from other nations have yet to allow the concept of an employee owned business or corporation to emerge in their legal systems. Cooperatives are tax-free and generally protected by governments as social orders within the area of human and civil rights in addition to being legal businesses.

Cooperatives empower communities.
Cooperatives are and remain to be the safest, most sustainable and lowest-risk type of an investment an individual can make because the foundation of the cooperative involve intangible assets, membership involves special rights, privileges and benefits that are available through belonging. In a cooperative members in essence belong to one another equally and are responsible for perpetuating the cooperatorship. Globcal International has developed the first international cooperatorship that is truly non-governmental because it is formed as a non-state actor and bases its jurisdiction in the offshore international realm of the high-seas under admiralty, maritime and international law.

What you choose to follow or be a part of in life is generally based solely in your personal character and personality, but we do know that, once people begin to realize the potential of cooperatives and the benefits that are possible they will always cherish their cooperative memberships with our global development and by being a part of cooperatives locally in their own communities, cooperatives are security. Cooperatives are known for being socially responsible, fair, fraternal, equal and democratic. They are also designed to distribute benefits and profits equally to members. Commentary by David J. Wright

For information regarding the reformation of your business for the international sector or remove your state of incorporation or to offshore your personal character and intellectual property to a tax-free jurisdiction, then join us at Globcal International as a non-state citizen, then see the membership link on our blog.

Scaling Up Cooperatives to Reach the Sustainable Development Goals

Article: Huffington-Post

Cooperatives are Naturally the Best Way to promote the SDGs

Cooperatives empower women.
Long before Uber or Airbnb, cooperatives capitalized on a sharing economy, but with an explicit mission to share benefits with everyone in society, especially the poor and vulnerable. Cooperatives have a storied history and carry distinct advantages in addressing the needs of low-income people. They rely on sharing information and trust in communities around a common purpose.

Over the decades, cooperatives have had success in areas like savings, agriculture, housing, or distribution of electricity. While there have been many improvements, they have faced challenges in areas such as tax policy, discriminatory regulation, achieving scale, and prevailing business attitudes toward their mission and business model.

To achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) — a set of 17 global goals which seek to end poverty by 2030, promote peace, and preserve the planet for future generations — we need to take advantage of the power of cooperatives. The SDGs fit nicely under the umbrella of the World Bank Group’s twin goals of ending poverty by 2030 and promoting shared prosperity.

The work is daunting, particularly in the area of financial inclusion. In 2014, only 62 percent of the world’s adult population had a financial account - leaving 2 billion adults without one.

Cooperative Financial Institutions (or CFI’s) include savings and credit cooperatives, credit unions, financial cooperatives, as well as savings and loan associations. They are key strategic partners in achieving both the goals of universal financial access, ending extreme poverty. They have low operating costs and are located in remote, rural areas with no financial institutions.

Yet for many of these member-owned institutions, scaling up savings services is impaired by challenges related to management and staff capacity, governance, and oversight and supervision. Some financial cooperatives and credit unions cannot safely lend funds received as deposits due to lack of credit capacity and systems.

We can help financial cooperatives scale-up by supporting them with technical advice and new technology to help them share data and information with their clients and with development practitioners. They can also benefit from active global partnerships with multilateral institutions, non-governmental organizations, and the private sector.

CFIs are one of the main providers of financial services to low-income people, with 700 million members and accountholders worldwide. CFIs have large constituencies in India, China, Indonesia, Brazil, Mexico, Kenya, Morocco, and over 35 smaller developing countries such as Togo and Haiti.

Last year, the World Bank Group’s private sector arm, the IFC, had an estimated $500 million of investments in CFIs around the world. The World Bank Group has been active for decades in this area. Some of the most notable programs include the Indian Dairy Cooperative, which has created an estimated 250,000 jobs, mostly in rural areas. Similarly, Mexico’s National Savings and Financial Services Bank has helped strengthen savings and credit institutions that serve millions of rural residents, who would otherwise have been relegated to the margins of the formal financial sector.

The World Bank Group’s policy teams have helped governments supervise and regulate cooperative financial institutions. For example, in 2009, the Bank Group worked with Rwanda to strengthen both the supervision and reach of Savings and Credit Cooperatives. By mid-2012 financial access in Rwanda increased from 47 percent to 72 percent. The newly created savings and credit cooperatives played an important role in this increase since they operated in 215 rural locations in which no financial institution existed previously. And the partnership with Rwanda also significantly increased the financial sustainability of the savings and credit cooperatives.

In a more mobile and urban world, cooperatives must adapt, while maintaining their basic values and approach. As seen in Sub-Saharan Africa, mobile money accounts can drive financial inclusion. While just 1 percent of adults globally say they use a mobile money account and nothing else, in Sub-Saharan Africa, 12 percent of adults (64 million adults) have mobile money accounts (compared to just 2 percent worldwide); 45 percent of them have only a mobile money account. Mobile money accounts can help narrow the gap in financial inclusion between men and women, which could have important effects on inequality and child welfare. CFIs will have to stay abreast of these developments and exploit these new technologies to maximize financial inclusion, particularly for the poor.

Capitalizing on cooperatives’ successes and learning from their mistakes can help us expand the menu of options as we search for more inclusive and sustainable models of development, and new ways of building and sharing knowledge. In this way we can significantly contribute to our common goal of ending extreme poverty in a single generation.

Republished from the Huffington Post, Scaling Up Cooperatives to Reach the Sustainable Development Goals by Mahmoud Mohieldin Senior Vice President for the 2030 Development Agenda, UN Relations and Partnerships

Friday, October 23, 2015

Taking Measures to Assist Europe's New Residents

Globcal International is an organization that takes a very serious view on all matters relative to human rights and our great civilization. Currently we are involved in the development of a global program involving citizenship alternatives for those who have been marginalized by the system, those who live and work internationally, and for those who have had enough of the day-in-day-out nation-state politics based in envy, plunder, racism, and greed resulting in societies that were built on discrimination and nationalism (most national governments).

Preparing Europe for Global Citizenship

Goodwill Ambassadors Karen Cantrell and
Antonino Landi meeting in Palermo, Sicily 
Over the past 20 years those responsible for the changes that are occurring in our society (people like you, me and others) have been focused on creating a global society that is rooted in fairness, best practices, equality, peace and sustainability. We have all had our ideals challenged by organizations influenced by their sponsors seeking an advantage over these horizons including religious institutions and nation-states that seek to possess and control the world, its riches, people and their advantage through corrupt controls.

In late September we took on and adopted a 'new deal' with new goals proposed by world leaders who unanimously agreed at the United Nations under the framework of a 15 year plan to revolutionize our great civilization eliminating poverty, bringing equality to humanity, and saving the planet from global warming and climate change. They labelled the world-wide program the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG)s for those who work within the framework and nicknamed the project the Global Goals.

Our organization is delighted with the Global Goals as a way to bring equality to our planet and the people who inhabit it; however there are many issues and a great deal of resistance from those who want to retain their brute force control over the humanity. The pain and toil that built their nations over the years combined with organizations and corporations corruptly invested in country economies are at the helm of the disagreements. Despite the resistance of the shift toward a globalized world, the world leaders including monarchs and those elected democratically have all (193 of 196) agreed to the changes proposed by the 17 SDGs with 169 prime targets over the next 15 years.

Clearing the Way for Refugee and Migration Services

In an effort to better prepare our projects for implementation and development we had to take a first hand look to examine the crisis situations around the world especially those which involve discrimination. To accomplish this we needed to depend on our ambassadors in Europe to provide their first hand experience with the refugee crisis there. Coincidentally our goodwill ambassador, Princess Karen Cantrell traveled to Europe on October 13 and has taken time to meet with other Globcal International ambassadors regarding the refugee and migration issue.

Ambassador Cantrell is an executive council member and co-founder of Globcal International, she is the key person in the administration and development of the Hospitallers Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem (HOSLJ), a philanthropic charity and priory of the Roman Catholic Church located in the United States. During her trip she has shared some critical viewpoints and first hand knowledge relative to the refugee crisis in an effort to provide Globcal International better understanding over the issue.

When leaving Germany where she noted some discrimination against arriving Syrian refugees, she went to consult with our volunteer representative for Italy, Ambassador Antonino Landi in Palermo, Sicily to discuss the refugee crisis and to justify an aspect within the formation of our global citizenship project especially for refugees and their families.

Ambassador Cantrell reported that; "there was a great deal of debate and misgiving," she witnessed, "first hand a great deal of discrimination, but also a great deal of pro-refugee awareness and activism." She said in closing, "Germany is run by people with great minds and they have accepted this enormous social responsibility when others have turned their heads. Chancellor Merkel has stood fast on this issue and has the support of the majority of the German people. Those who fear a takeover have to live with their narrow mindedness and discriminatory nationalist ideals." She also cited the example of the Turkish wave of immigration years ago which has turned out historically to be very beneficial to the country's economy and the betterment of the society in general.

Including Everyone in the Global Agenda

After careful review of international law all the recent immigrants to Europe each and all possess particular human rights as refugees under the United Nations and may potentially become new global citizens under the Globcal International program based on the updated development of our project as soon as this January.

Thursday, October 01, 2015

Goodwill Ambassadors call for Social Media Integrity

Professionalize your Social Media Profile for Transparency

New days, innovations, and ideals are ahead for us all as the world embraces and comes to grip with the new United Nations' Global Goals (SDG)s that promise to change humanity and the world-view. Consider the fact that we are going to end poverty, alleviate hunger, and change the world to create the equality we all want around the world. Now is the time to adapt!

The conversion will be in many ways abrupt, well-controlled, orderly, stubborn, and exhausting, but will involve a high-degree of transparency. This change must involve transparency because if trust and integrity become an issue there will be a disaster. Facebook, Google, LinkedIn, YouTube, and many other Internet based enterprises are already directly involved with the globalization of local micro-economies and their integration with the macro or global economic system; they would probably be indirectly involved anyway whether or not they support the United Nations SDGs or not.

Using the Social Media to Create Trust and Transparency

The social media will play a big role in updating our world to comply with the 17 Sustainable Development Goals, SDGs, or Global Goals that were signed last week by world leaders at the Sustainable Development Summit in New York. Now nations fear losing their sovereignty while people gain more control their personal human rights and over the destiny of the planet within the guidelines to meet the goals. This will all be done using the Internet (super-connected world) to govern the rule of law and monitor progressive development within the nations. Its our understanding international transparency teams are also being used to eliminate corruption in governments.

Social media and online personal profiles will play a gigantic role in the implementation of these Global Goals. The protagonists of the great development will be expected to be transparent in the delivery of their work as social entrepreneurs and members of international organizations otherwise the public, donors, and other organizations will not be able to trust to receive their funds and execute projects.

Focus on your Presentation

Create a well-elaborated social media profile that people can find using Google and Bing search engines. You can create profiles on Google+, Facebook, LinkedIn, XING, VK, and other social media platforms that are compliant with the new emerging Internet Governance under RDFa and Schema.org/

A good social media profile allows people to reach you by email or through your profile directly, include your place of employment, where your currently reside and your home location. It will include your personal photograph or resemblance. Your social media posts should be adjusted so everyone can see your work, if you use Facebook or other networks for family and personal purposes too, you can adjust your posts.

Goodwill ambassadors working with Globcal International are encouraged to keep a public figure profile that provides a transparent curriculum vitae of their life's work, and expect that all others responsible for handling funds derived through donations, philanthropy, or other bequests do the same if they work with non-governmental organizations (NGO)s, with government, foundations, or with corporations. Transparency best practices start with the person working within the NGO or corporation not under the political protection of a corporate body and reputation.

There are a great number of other organizations, corporations, and Internet social entrepreneurs that are jumping on the bandwagon to take advantage of the 176 trillion dollars being spent by the World Bank to realize the SDGs over the next 15 years to create "the World We Want." Many players are very skeptical because they know that there is too much work involved of value from our former social generation that needs to be adapted so the matrix or system does not come tumbling down upon itself; so it may be some time before we fully understand how these 17 goals will be pursued and realized.

Best Practices and Business

Using the Internet, organizations like Globcal International, the Rand Corporation, the Council on Foreign Relations and other think tanks (public policy institutes) are examining and analyzing the world playing field with the advent of the UN's new Global Goals and Post-2015 Agenda we are prepared to adapt and understand a global rule of law involving ecological integrity with other nations and as it seems corporations. 

Directly ahead we can expect to see a great degree of sovereign, national, and corporate imperial policy manipulation to maintain control and ties over land, mining, and exploitable natural resource interests. Utilizing the ideals of best practices and transparency (as stipulated) corporations and non-governmental organizations established under the jurisdictional laws of the United States of America will have both the most to gain and most to lose when it comes time to adapt, beginning now to the Post-2015 Agenda.

Transparency is the Key

It is our understanding as advocates of goodwill, the Global Goals, fair-globalization, and social reform will greatly depend on the social media based on the design and development integrity involving Internet RDFa, those who operate quietly in the shadows as unknown or global corporate citizens will be required step-up and show themselves so that other non-corporate global citizens can believe in them and trust them. Be understood without the corporate veil, people trust people not corporations, it would be unnatural to trust a non-human corporate person. With the Global Goals the system of trusting governments, corporations, and non-profits became much more difficult or challenging for everyone involved, but much better too!