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Showing posts with label World Bank. Show all posts
Showing posts with label World Bank. Show all posts

Thursday, March 23, 2017

Indigenous Forest Guardians: Good or Bad?

Empowering Indigenous Peoples with their Own Lands

Studies show Indigenous people are the best custodians of the planet's threatened forests.

By Paola Totaro
 
WASHINGTON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Granting formal land rights to indigenous people living in the world's tropical forests is among the most effective, but underused, ways to stop illegal deforestation that fuels violence, poverty and global warming, according to new research.

Local communities are best equipped to safeguard valuable forests, and those with strong land rights are the most effective, said a raft of studies presented this week at the World Bank's annual Land and Poverty Conference.

A representative from the Maya Leaders Alliance, Belize, addresses the crowd on behalf
of award winners at the Equator Prize ceremony in Paris. Image: Eco-Business
Deforestation is known to be detrimental to the earth's climate. Clearing woodlands for agriculture and grazing, and fires that often follow, is responsible for about one-tenth of carbon emissions that contribute to a dangerous rise in global temperatures, researchers say.

Shrinking forests can cause poverty and conflicts as well, as local residents are forced to compete for fewer resources.

A six-nation study for the World Bank's Program on Forests found deforestation rates are significantly lower where communities have legal rights to the forests and government support for management and enforcement, compared with areas elsewhere.

"Critical links" exist among land security, local economic development, biodiversity conservation and reduced carbon emissions, it said.

Research from Indonesia showed conflict over land was minimized and investment was encouraged when local communities were involved in designing transportation corridors around proposed mining projects.
Another study from Indonesia showed granting long-term rights over mangrove swamps to indigenous people has better protected the critical coastal ecosystems than in areas where the endangered buffers between land and sea are not locally managed.

Less than a fifth of the world's population has formal land rights, or tenure.

"Granting communal land rights to indigenous inhabitants of tropical forests is among the most underused and effective solutions to reducing deforestation that fuels climate change," said Peter Veit, director of the Washington-based World Resources Institute's land rights initiative.

"Securing rights also has implications for reducing poverty and conflict," he said.

More than 1,500 land rights specialists converged on the U.S capital this week to share their findings.
The use of giant swathes of information such as advanced satellite imagery can identify patterns such as water use in land rights and land management, said Andrew Steer, head of the WRI and a former World Bank Special Envoy for Climate Change.

"We can show water risk, make future projections of population, use crowd sourcing and cloud computing in a way that is transforming how water is used by private companies and indigenous communities," he said.
Many papers highlighted challenges posed to developing nations by big mining and agricultural industries that are using technology to gain access to remote regions.

Nevertheless, researchers said indigenous peoples and campaigners working with them are harnessing technology as well to expose illegal deforestation or land use and seek remedies and justice.

The research is significant to help back up indigenous communities' claims that they are the best custodians of global forests.

 Map illustrating that tropical regions contain 20% of the world's carbon. More
science reveals that these areas must remain natural for the survival of the planet.

Some critics have claimed remote tropical forests looked after by indigenous groups are protected due to a lack of development pressure rather than good management techniques.

An estimated 15 percent of the world's forest cover remains untouched.

Brazil, once a leader in slowing deforestation, has recently been accused of rolling back gains made by providing land rights to rural people in the face of recession and a political crisis.

The World Bank estimates that forest ecosystems cover a fifth of the land in Latin America, representing half of the world's tropical forests.
 

Reporting by Paola Totaro, Editing by Ellen Wulfhorst. Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, women's rights, trafficking, property rights and climate change. Visit news.trust.org/


Commentary: Indigenous peoples are in great danger globally as their territorial rights are being challenged by corporations and states that want to claim natural resources, often indigenous people are in the way and now for the first time in history there is a chance to perpetually preserve global biodiversity and what remains of our natural world with these spectacular people. Their freedom is our freedom, but theirs is at greater risk while at great disadvantage without empowerment to defend themselves and their rights as human beings.

Read more about forest carbon and indigenous peoples in Toward a Common Baseline of Carbon Storage on Collective Lands and Tropical Forest Carbon in Indigenous Territories; A Global Analysis.

Monday, February 13, 2017

Indigenous Lands: Most Valuable Property on the Planet

Indigenous Peoples Lands Guard 80 Percent of World’s Biodiversity

Baher Kamal - Inter Press Service

They are more than 370 million self-identified peoples in some 70 countries around the world. In Latin America alone there are over 400 groups, each with a distinct language and culture, though the biggest concentration is in Asia and the Pacific– with an estimated 70 per cent. And their traditional lands guard over 80 per cent of the planet’s biodiversity.

Download Report from the World Bank
They are the indigenous peoples.

They have rich and ancient cultures and view their social, economic, environmental and spiritual systems as interdependent. And they make valuable contributions to the world’s heritage thanks to their traditional knowledge and their understanding of ecosystem management.

“But they are also among the world’s most vulnerable, marginalized and disadvantaged groups. And they have in-depth, varied and locally rooted knowledge of the natural world, “says the Rome-based International Fund for Agriculture Development (IFAD).

“Unfortunately, indigenous peoples too often pay a price for being different and far too frequently face discrimination,” the Fund, which hosts on Feb 10 and 13 on Rome the Global Meeting of the Indigenous People Forum in the Italian capital.

During this biennial meeting, the United Nations specialized agency will bring together representatives of Indigenous Peoples’ Organizations from across the world, as well as leaders of partner bodies to engage in a direct dialogue and improve participation of indigenous peoples in the Fund’s country programs.

Over the centuries, the Indigenous peoples “have been dispossessed of their lands, territories and resources and, as a consequence, have often lost control over their own way of life. Worldwide, they account for 5 per cent of the population, but represent 15 per cent of those living in poverty.”

One of the most effective ways to enable indigenous peoples to overcome poverty, it adds, is to support their efforts to shape and direct their own destinies, and to ensure that they are the co-creators and co-managers of development initiatives.

Rights of Indigenous Peoples

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, adopted by the General Assembly on Sep. 13, 2007, establishes a universal framework of minimum standards for the survival, dignity, well-being and rights of the world’s indigenous peoples.

The Declaration addresses individual and collective rights; cultural rights and identity; and rights to education, health, employment and language. And it outlaws discrimination against indigenous peoples and promotes their full and effective participation in all matters that concern them.

It also ensures their right to remain distinct and to pursue their own priorities in economic, social and cultural development. The International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples is observed on Aug. 9 every year.
Announcing the Forum, IFAD noted that it has more than 30 years of experience working with indigenous peoples. In fact, since 2003, an average of about 22 per cent of the Fund’s annual lending has supported initiatives for indigenous peoples, mainly in Asia and Latin America.

Since 2007, it has administered the Indigenous Peoples Assistance Facility (IPAF). Through small grants of up to 50,000 dollars, it supports the aspirations of indigenous peoples by funding micro-projects that strengthen their culture, identity, knowledge, natural resources, and intellectual-property and human rights.

To help translate policy commitments into action, it has established an Indigenous Peoples’ Forum that promotes a process of dialogue and consultation among indigenous peoples’ organizations, IFAD staff and member states.

The Fund empowers communities to participate fully in determining strategies for their development and to pursue their own goals and visions by strengthening grass-roots organizations and local governance.

Land is not only crucial to the survival of indigenous peoples, as it is for most poor rural people – it is central to their identities, the Fund reports. “They have a deep spiritual relationship to their ancestral territories. Moreover, when they have secure access to land, they also have a firm base from which to improve their livelihoods.”

According to this international Fund, indigenous peoples and their knowledge systems have a special role to play in the conservation and sustainable management of natural resources.

Indigenous Women’s Untapped Potential

Also named “bank of the poorest” as it provides grants and low-interest credits to the poorest rural communities, recognises indigenous women’s untapped potential as stewards of natural resources and biodiversity, as guardians of cultural diversity, and as peace brokers in conflict mitigation.

Nonetheless, it says, indigenous women are often the most disadvantaged members of their communities because of their limited access to education, assets and credit, and their exclusion from decision-making processes.

This ‘bank of the poorest’ is a specialised agency of the United Nations, which was established as an international financial institution in 1977, being one of the major outcomes of the 1974 World Food Conference, which was organised in response to the food crises of the early 1970s that primarily affected the Sahelian countries of Africa.

That world conference resolved that “an International Fund for Agricultural Development should be established immediately to finance agricultural development projects primarily for food production in the developing countries.”

One of the most important insights emerging from the Conference was that the causes of food insecurity and famine were not so much failures in food production but structural problems relating to poverty, and to the fact that the majority of the developing world’s poor populations were concentrated in rural areas.

Since its creation, IFAD invested 18.4 billion dollars to help 464 million rural poor people.

Republished from Morung Express

Tuesday, October 18, 2016

New Partnership Financing for SDGs

UN leader announces launch of new partnership platform to support financing for the Sustainable Development Goals

At UN Headquarters, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon addresses the High-level meeting on Financial Solutions for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). UN Photo/Amanda Voisard

10 October 2016 – Announcing the launch today of a new platform for scaling up innovative finance solutions to support the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said the initiative can help in identifying and piloting innovative finance instruments that can drive investment and support well thought-out SDG interventions.


“Financial actors and institutions are already beginning to develop solutions for attracting private capital in support of the 2030 Agenda [for Sustainable Development],” Mr. Ban told a meeting with high-level officials from Ministries of finance and foreign affairs, together with leaders from major global financial institutions at UN Headquarters today.

Titled 'Financial solutions for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs),' the gathering showcased the initiatives and examples from around the world on how best business and the financial services sector can engage in the SDG process and transform markets.

Mr. Ban said that the proposed multi-stakeholder Financial Innovation Platform would support the identification and piloting of innovative finance instruments, and would engage key development actors, including Governments, civil society, philanthropic organizations, entrepreneurs, institutional investors, banks, project developers and development finance institutions.


Mr. Ban, who will step down as the top UN official when his tenure ends on 31 December, expressed hope that the Platform will provide the best possible know-how to support the efforts by the incoming Secretary-General.

“Sustainability and stability of the financial system are mutually reinforcing,” he said, emphasizing the importance of reorienting existing financial flows to sustainable objectives so that investors will reap the benefits in the form of secure markets and thriving consumers.

That is why Governments, gathering in Addis Ababa in July 2015, adopted an an action agenda aimed at creating policy and regulatory environments that provide incentives for long-term and sustainable investments, he added.


According to Mr. Ban, the financial sector, spearheaded by companies such as Aviva, is promoting the creation of international benchmarks while the World Bank Treasury Office is issuing innovative financial instruments that are generating new investment opportunities.

Efforts are now needed to build on these initiatives, and the United Nations can play “a catalytic role” and intends to create a venue where leaders from all sectors, including government, can join forces, learn from each other and align their actions for greater collective effect, the Secretary-General said.

Many new ideas and solutions are already in play. International Housing Solutions, a global private equity investor, is using both catalytic and commercial capital investors to make green homes affordable to a wide population in Sub-Saharan Africa. CEO Michael Falcone said at the meeting that the creation of a UN platform will help to expand affordable green homes across the region.

“We are engaged in nothing less than the transformation of global capital markets,” said Mark Wilson, Group CEO of Aviva, an international insurance and investment company. “That demands major change. “If business isn't sustainable then society is at risk and if society isn't sustainable then business is at risk. So it's just enlightened self-interest for business to support the SDGs,” he said.


"While there are many pathways forward to achieve the SDGs, one thing is clear: business as usual is not an option to close the $2.5 trillion annual funding gap in developing countries alone," said Judith Rodin, President, The Rockefeller Foundation. "To realize the SDGs we need to foster a new era of collaboration and coordination, and the UN Secretary-General has unprecedented convening power to do this by bringing together leaders from different sectors,” she stressed.

The concept of a new multi-stakeholder forum to help finance progress on the Goals emerged following the 2015 Financing for Development Conference that took place in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. At that Conference, world leaders called for creative and innovative solutions by the private sector to scale-up investments in activities that contribute to the sustainable development.

It is now clear to many in the finance sector, that there are new demands of the marketplace as well as shareholders seeking sustainable investments. This is why a new framework for sustainable investing is needed. The know-how that is being made available within the finance sector will be shared and made accessible: the platform will accelerate solutions and encourage scale up.

For more information and to receive regular updates about the United Nations and the Sustainable Development Goals please subscribe to my personal Google News feed or you can subscribe to Globcal International's United Nations SDGs official syndicated feed. 

Tuesday, August 30, 2016

New Global Human Identity Standards

New Global Identity Standards World-Wide

This year the World Economic Forum (WEF) with the collaboration of many well known and many not so well known corporate and nongovernmental organizations devised a new road map (blueprint) this month for the global financial community to utilize here-forth for everyone's mutual benefit and financial protection beyond our borders to establish a universal (global) identity verification system.

Security Document World said, "In the report, the WEF calls on financial institutions to lead the charge in developing robust digital identity solutions that would bring benefits to users, financial institutions, and society as a whole."

Lots of New Articles

Digital biometric scanner, soon to be very commonplace at international ports.
Over the last several weeks we have seen a great increase in the number of news articles being presented involving identity, biometric identification, digital banking and new governmental identification programs on our 'Human Rights and Identity' news feed. In the United States last week the government began to require biometric (digital) photo identification (Real ID) at government facilities including all military bases and institutional centers.

The United Nations with the World Bank announced late last year the ID4D, Identification for Development program which promises that they will work to help see that every human being on the planet has an identity by 2020. Since 2014 over 50 new multi-million corporations have quietly emerged globally to work and contract their innovative services and products for banks, people and governments.

Perhaps you have heard of some of the larger well-known corporations and global players that are being recognized as leaders of the new identification industry; PayPal, Deloitte, Unisys, Experian, Caribou Digital, Facebook, and Consent are working together as a consortium of corporations in these innovations right now. The United States and United Kingdom governments also have great interests and involvement in pushing forward and creating the new identity industries that will have an annual value in the hundreds of billions of dollars per year.
MeReal Cards private secure fool-proof biometrics.

Human Identity Revolution

Taking the lead in the human identity revolution in recent years has not been the United States but surprisingly is India, Pakistan, Honduras, Ecuador and Brazil who are all using digital biometric elements for human identification at their borders and in airports.

Between now and 2020, as a research analyst, I can safely speculate that there will 300,000+ universal identity verification terminals will be installed in airports, border crossings, checkpoints, and sea ports around the world accepting over 1000 different passports and electronic access credentials. Within the industry many anticipate many new emerging states and jurisdictions all using high tech credentials. All people including diplomats identity will be referenced in the global system based on their legal credentials.

Nation-states will not be the sole providers of identification, the corporations listed above are as integral in the system as the government once was and so are companies like Coca-Cola, Google, IBM, WWF, and other transnational global corporations and organizations with special international employment credentials, services and protection.

Changing the System after 83 Years

Many people do not realize but it has only been since about 1933 that nations have been fully involved in collecting data, claiming people and registering their citizens as assets. Only now citizens, (people) of all types will become more versatile (free?) in to whom 'they choose' to serve as citizens, demonstrating self-determination and taking on their social responsibility as residents of a country or place, which is in essence what citizenship is all about anyway. It is a whole new ball game under our true human rights!

Non-National Blockchain Identification

It is suggested that neither the government or state can be trusted with our identity and several years ago people began to experiment with encrypted digital block-chains online that are like indelible electronic ink.

Many people are betting the revolution will be dominated by non-national blockchain registries of confidential encrypted data based on a similar system as Bitcoin. Recently we witnessed the rollout of Bitnation Pangaea which offers a comfortable solution for those who wish to protect their privacy. Their system allows for contract registration, notarization of documents and marriages.

A recent article from 'themerkle' identifies four blockchain companies focusing on secure digital identity solutions. The companies named in the article are Evernym, Blockstack Labs, KYC-Chain, and UniquID, all the companies have clear developments and niches staked out.

There will be private, dual, multi-national, corporate, university, cooperative, organizational and nation-state citizenships; I imagine that the transitional period to acquire all of our human rights will strangely enough all compete for our allegiance as their human capital and all have a hand in defining our identity in an official way.

Understanding the new system is hard to imagine until you understand the new emergent law based on the (new) Universal Declaration of Human Rights and place yourself at sea (stateless) without any citizenship. Our concept resolves the problem of finding a place to land your ship based on the law, your knowledge, education, experience, abilities and asset value as a human being within our cooperative or in your identity as a global citizen instead of a refugee or stateless person. The best thing about our stateless neocitizenship development is that it utilizes other accepted systems as our base.

Rapid Change Ahead

From the great advancement and progress we currently see in government use of biometric identification, we should expect that all nations and territories will soon meet the new international requirements within the next five years. Governments in some countries already restrict access to national and state parks, top organizations around the world have special biometric digital identification for their executive and volunteer assets.

The new industry-focused documents we found online this week reveal great new opportunities and outstanding potential for entrepreneurs with ideals to create both soft, medium and hard identification systems. However the way the industry is developed there will be little chance to enter the horizontal global market so would-be market developers and thinkers need to decide which floor they want to begin with.

"New entrants into this space will have to navigate a layer that may look like a sandwich filling between two slices of bread, one being Facebook’s (at the moment) light verification identity platform and the other being any state-led identity platform—in other words, at both ends of the spectrum there are incumbents which will be difficult to compete against."

"Advancements in biometrics, encryption, and distributed computing are leading to sophisticated technology solutions and new business models for managing digital identity. But again we must emphasize that while the technology is easy to focus on, the 'analog complements' in this sector—the regulatory environments, political structures, cultural attitudes, and more—are just as critical for success, especially given their diversity across different markets."

Banking Technology and Safety

It does not stop here, people that need to use money and the financial system will be able to use their natural biometric indicators like fingerprints, iris scans, cards with microchips, cellular smartphones, or passports and other identity devices. The financial sector is the strongest component behind personal identity verification and international security, they are insisting on biometrics.

The more that is known about the things that occur in our civil societies and civilization bring safety and security to the law abiding and good people that we all want to be. The ideals regarding identity, human taxonomy, corporate citizenship, and migration being implemented today will revolutionize life on the planet and how we perceive ourselves as human beings. It will make sustainability a reality, reduce corruption and make life more accountable.

Follow this subject by following our Human Identity News Feed, new stories daily! Globcal International provides access to a variety of news feeds to our members and the public to know the current trends and adapt with the changes ahead.

Friday, August 26, 2016

Human Empowerment through Cooperation

Making the Cooperative the Ideal Business Model

The ideal of the 'cooperative' was first developed in the 1820s, long before privately held corporations by individuals, based on the development of the free and fair exchange of legally held assets through common ownership of a business or distribution system designed to benefit its members who collectively own the institution as a society. The non-profit and for profit co-operative embodiment today has become a solid institutional part of the corporate laws of many countries while in other countries that depend on the concept of international cooperation from other nations have yet to allow the concept of an employee owned business or corporation to emerge in their legal systems. Cooperatives are tax-free and generally protected by governments as social orders within the area of human and civil rights in addition to being legal businesses.

Cooperatives empower communities.
Cooperatives are and remain to be the safest, most sustainable and lowest-risk type of an investment an individual can make because the foundation of the cooperative involve intangible assets, membership involves special rights, privileges and benefits that are available through belonging. In a cooperative members in essence belong to one another equally and are responsible for perpetuating the cooperatorship. Globcal International has developed the first international cooperatorship that is truly non-governmental because it is formed as a non-state actor and bases its jurisdiction in the offshore international realm of the high-seas under admiralty, maritime and international law.

What you choose to follow or be a part of in life is generally based solely in your personal character and personality, but we do know that, once people begin to realize the potential of cooperatives and the benefits that are possible they will always cherish their cooperative memberships with our global development and by being a part of cooperatives locally in their own communities, cooperatives are security. Cooperatives are known for being socially responsible, fair, fraternal, equal and democratic. They are also designed to distribute benefits and profits equally to members. Commentary by David J. Wright

For information regarding the reformation of your business for the international sector or remove your state of incorporation or to offshore your personal character and intellectual property to a tax-free jurisdiction, then join us at Globcal International as a non-state citizen, then see the membership link on our blog.

Scaling Up Cooperatives to Reach the Sustainable Development Goals

Article: Huffington-Post

Cooperatives are Naturally the Best Way to promote the SDGs

Cooperatives empower women.
Long before Uber or Airbnb, cooperatives capitalized on a sharing economy, but with an explicit mission to share benefits with everyone in society, especially the poor and vulnerable. Cooperatives have a storied history and carry distinct advantages in addressing the needs of low-income people. They rely on sharing information and trust in communities around a common purpose.

Over the decades, cooperatives have had success in areas like savings, agriculture, housing, or distribution of electricity. While there have been many improvements, they have faced challenges in areas such as tax policy, discriminatory regulation, achieving scale, and prevailing business attitudes toward their mission and business model.

To achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) — a set of 17 global goals which seek to end poverty by 2030, promote peace, and preserve the planet for future generations — we need to take advantage of the power of cooperatives. The SDGs fit nicely under the umbrella of the World Bank Group’s twin goals of ending poverty by 2030 and promoting shared prosperity.

The work is daunting, particularly in the area of financial inclusion. In 2014, only 62 percent of the world’s adult population had a financial account - leaving 2 billion adults without one.

Cooperative Financial Institutions (or CFI’s) include savings and credit cooperatives, credit unions, financial cooperatives, as well as savings and loan associations. They are key strategic partners in achieving both the goals of universal financial access, ending extreme poverty. They have low operating costs and are located in remote, rural areas with no financial institutions.

Yet for many of these member-owned institutions, scaling up savings services is impaired by challenges related to management and staff capacity, governance, and oversight and supervision. Some financial cooperatives and credit unions cannot safely lend funds received as deposits due to lack of credit capacity and systems.

We can help financial cooperatives scale-up by supporting them with technical advice and new technology to help them share data and information with their clients and with development practitioners. They can also benefit from active global partnerships with multilateral institutions, non-governmental organizations, and the private sector.

CFIs are one of the main providers of financial services to low-income people, with 700 million members and accountholders worldwide. CFIs have large constituencies in India, China, Indonesia, Brazil, Mexico, Kenya, Morocco, and over 35 smaller developing countries such as Togo and Haiti.

Last year, the World Bank Group’s private sector arm, the IFC, had an estimated $500 million of investments in CFIs around the world. The World Bank Group has been active for decades in this area. Some of the most notable programs include the Indian Dairy Cooperative, which has created an estimated 250,000 jobs, mostly in rural areas. Similarly, Mexico’s National Savings and Financial Services Bank has helped strengthen savings and credit institutions that serve millions of rural residents, who would otherwise have been relegated to the margins of the formal financial sector.

The World Bank Group’s policy teams have helped governments supervise and regulate cooperative financial institutions. For example, in 2009, the Bank Group worked with Rwanda to strengthen both the supervision and reach of Savings and Credit Cooperatives. By mid-2012 financial access in Rwanda increased from 47 percent to 72 percent. The newly created savings and credit cooperatives played an important role in this increase since they operated in 215 rural locations in which no financial institution existed previously. And the partnership with Rwanda also significantly increased the financial sustainability of the savings and credit cooperatives.

In a more mobile and urban world, cooperatives must adapt, while maintaining their basic values and approach. As seen in Sub-Saharan Africa, mobile money accounts can drive financial inclusion. While just 1 percent of adults globally say they use a mobile money account and nothing else, in Sub-Saharan Africa, 12 percent of adults (64 million adults) have mobile money accounts (compared to just 2 percent worldwide); 45 percent of them have only a mobile money account. Mobile money accounts can help narrow the gap in financial inclusion between men and women, which could have important effects on inequality and child welfare. CFIs will have to stay abreast of these developments and exploit these new technologies to maximize financial inclusion, particularly for the poor.

Capitalizing on cooperatives’ successes and learning from their mistakes can help us expand the menu of options as we search for more inclusive and sustainable models of development, and new ways of building and sharing knowledge. In this way we can significantly contribute to our common goal of ending extreme poverty in a single generation.

Republished from the Huffington Post, Scaling Up Cooperatives to Reach the Sustainable Development Goals by Mahmoud Mohieldin Senior Vice President for the 2030 Development Agenda, UN Relations and Partnerships

Thursday, August 27, 2015

Understanding the New Globalization

What does globalization mean to you? Next month in late September 193 of the 196 countries in the world will launch and begin a new pact that replaces the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and moves forward the United Nations Agenda 21. The 'new deal' promises sustainable development and putting an end to most of the world's most pressing issues like poverty, hunger, climate change, and war.

The new SDGs (Sustainable Development Goals) involve 17 basic goals that no one living today can resist or deny taking favorable action upon. The World Bank is promising financing equivalent to over $176,000,000,000,000 (trillion dollars) over the next 15 years and the accord is revolutionary favoring the natural environment and human beings as sustainable inhabitants of the planet. Everyone in the world will have a job and purpose, if done correctly and free of corruption there will be no more unemployment, hunger or poverty.
A protester carries a sign during the "People's Climate March" in the Manhattan
borough of New York, Sept. 21, 2014. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri

The new SDGs promise world peace, prosperity, and cooperation on a global scale. The Danish Institute for International Studies (DIIS) says that the new program can effectively build bridges of peace and friendships between nations that have been at odds based on religious and political conflicts. The United Nations says the new SDGs, “Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels.”

According to the UN: “This is the People’s Agenda, a plan of action for ending poverty in all its dimensions, irreversibly, everywhere, and leaving no one behind. It seeks to ensure peace and prosperity, and forge partnerships with people and planet at the core. The integrated, interlinked and indivisible 17 Sustainable Development Goals are the people’s goals and demonstrate the scale, universality and ambition of this new Agenda.”

The goals focus on development of new inclusive political systems under a global rule of law where "no one is left behind." The key will be in how the goals are implemented which has yet to have been fully revealed however are already beginning implementation in countries like Nigeria, Kenya and Mexico where governors of individual states will be given powers under stern conditions that force compliance and resist corruption.

Globalizing the Natural Planet with a Conscience


The ideal of globalization scares many people because they believe that it is a governmental plot or a takeover of the world by banks and others who do not have the best interests of humanity at heart; this is simply nonsense when we evaluate the reality of satisfying the necessity of the human condition. There will be a great deal of austerity however for some people that are living outside of the recommended norms of the SDGs will not be optional, contaminated rivers and ecosystems will be recovered to deliver sanity, health, well-being, and moderation.

Global issues like overpopulation and scarcity of resources will be addressed through aggressive programs that forge commonality, equality, cooperation, and integrity. In our opinion the sacrifices of some will be balanced and fair considering our historic disregard for the global ecosystem.

In the new system that will emerge under the SDGs we can expect to see digital global currency, improvements in technological systems, eradication of crime, elimination of corruption, advances in education, and a complete recovery of the natural environment. We can also expect to see new sustainable industries become mainstream (big business) like electric bicycles, alternative energy, reforestation, and public transportation.

Based in Ecosystem Vitality


Believe it or not with the amount of money being invested to create global sustainability and meet the SDGs there will be enough money for everyone to work (become employed) and leave existing business in tact, with strict new norms for everyone based in the governance of mother earth. The examples have been proven where the ecosystem is number one, like in the countries of Bhutan or New Zealand which are already well-ahead of the game.

It's clear that people living in areas like watersheds and factories located on rivers will need to adapt and perhaps move; but in reality for the future of humanity and the planet these changes need to occur despite inconvenience or expropriation to accommodate clean and vital ecosystems. The ends justify the means, as we thought they did when we exploited these resources recklessly and with wanton disregard for the natural world.

Speculators and those holding undeveloped lands with great anticipations may lose huge sums of hope in many of these deals so these lands into the public domain, but really they are not losing anything and will regain their original investments, they may lose their unscrupulousness, there's a silver lining for you all.

Climate change is currently so severe that we are absolutely certain that Miami will be lost within the next 12 years. The United Nations, the Pope, Dalai Lama and Barack Obama have all concurred this year on numerous occasions, that urgent and drastic steps must be taken to stop climate change and become sustainable. In the process international laws (most of which are US and European) are based in democracy will become globalized and everyone will be expected to live under a single global rule of law.

It's also very clear that all people can become part of this process through becoming global citizens and focusing their political and religious tendencies aside and understand the world from the Pachamama Perspective (Mother Earth Perspective).

Other Articles about this Topic:

Full List of the 17 Goals and 269 Targets, United Nations, August 03, 2015
UN deals must aim to satisfy need not greed, Thomson Reuters, August 27, 2015
Development's Digital Divide; Carl Bidlt, Project Syndicate, August 26, 2015
The Role of Youth Leaders in the Post-2015 UN Agenda; Huffington-Post August 25, 2015


Author's Comment

Get ready for a tidal wave, position yourself to become a global citizen and take advantage of 1000's of new opportunities to work full-time promoting and implementing sustainable development projects around the globe. The new Goodwill Ambassadors​ of the World are those who promote the SDG's and the global pact to recover our planet and create a sustainable world. Now maybe it's time to pay attention.

I have been involved in the protection of the planet since 1970 and have witnessed enough loss of the natural areas, wildlife, and contamination through disregard for our actions based on our supposed rights as superior beings in God, and now we finally realize the truth to over 500 years of mistakes, misgivings, and misunderstanding with the source of our lives, the earth. Personally any change toward natural preservation and reverting our impact on the environment, no matter how inconvenient it may be to mankind or his creation of his artificial kingdom. -David Wright