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Showing posts with label SDGs. Show all posts
Showing posts with label SDGs. Show all posts

Sunday, October 06, 2019

Starting an Indigenous Chocolate Factory

Original Chocolate from the Source

Piaroa Organic Wild (POW) Cacao from the Amazon

Globcal International is starting a new sustainable development project with Ecology Crossroads of Kentucky to help establish the first indigenous owned and operated chocolate factory in Venezuela under the observation and guidance of the international community through our organization.

Piaroa Organic Wild Cacao from the Guiana Highlands grown by the Guardians of the Forest.

The new venture will offer true wild forastero 'chocolate of origin' harvested and crafted by the indigenous Piaroa tribe of the Guiana Highlands in Amazonia's Orinoco River watershed, one of several potential original sources of the cacao tree. It is from the Orinoco and Black River (Rio Negro) that the tree may have made it's way north to the Caribbean, Trinidad including Mexico and south to Brazil by river, further through the indigenous peoples that have used and traded beans for thousands of years.

The project will be developed online as a crowdfunding campaign to form a social enterprise and will feature cocoa beans that are wild collected and harvested, then cured and sun-dried before being transformed into an amazing flavorful aromatic chocolate bar by members of the indigenous Piaroa tribe of Amazonas, Venezuela. The chocolate will be offered for direct international shipment using EMS (Express Mail Service) and made available through a distributors network for resale.

Cacao Piaroa

The Piaroa are new to the chocolate making scene, but they are not new to growing, harvesting or curing cacao beans, they have been propagating and planting cacao trees as a forest crop at least "since the late 1950's," according to tribal elders; they have been practicing ecologically sustainable agriculture for over 1,000 years. Cacao represents a major portion of their income with some communities producing several tons each per year. Agriculturally they are one of the most autonomous indigenous societies in Venezuela. The Piaroa also harvest other non-wood forest resources like fruits, nuts and honey as well as make handicrafts.

Traditionally (with cocoa beans) the Piaroa have not been treated fairly in the marketplace (selling their beans for a mere fraction of their value to predatory middlemen), this caused our organization to take an interest in their case in 2018. We were pleased to discover after doing research that their beans were being produced into premium craft chocolates by several bean-to-bar entrepreneurs in North America and were prized and cited with recognition internationally. Now because of governmental imposition into the cocoa trade it is difficult for anyone to purchase their beans.
"Knowing the importance and quality of their beans after receiving a sample and investigating other companies who have purchased their beans for making bar chocolate we came up with the ideal of them taking their operation one-step further by helping the Piaroa make the chocolate themselves here in Venezuela for international distribution and sale, which will ensure a them a fair-trade price to the grower and new work opportunities for the community." - David J. Wright
This year because government interference in the cocoa trade and changes to the local economy the Piaroa have not been able to find a fair price for their beans so they consulted with our organization to help them develop a crowdfunding project to both ensure them that they will get a premium price for their excellent beans in coming years and so they can earn more by producing the chocolate themselves, in our view by using the beans themselves they can increase the cacao farmer's income by 6x which is welcome news to the producers and creates new employment opportunities for others in the community.

Objective: Build a Chocolate Factory

The objective is to build a chocolate factory with international cooperation efforts and goodwill in the social media through a crowdfunding campaign to find investors, members and partners for the program.

The crowdfunding project we are developing with chocolate company involves the use of up 49% (49,000 shares) of the company being cooperatively (collectively) owned by independent investors while the other 51% will belong to members.The preferred shares are valued at $10 each and will be sold for $11-$12 each to cover funds transfer fees and crowdfunding commissions. The funds are needed in order to have adequate operating capital to start the business and operate for two years until such time the company can become solvent.

In a the business plan being crafted the preferred investor is offered a 15% return over their investment after one calendar year or they can wait until the third year to double or perhaps triple their original investment with when the company is valuated. The calendar year begins once the first 30,000 shares are sold, the equipment is installed and the factory is opened. We are looking to fund the program by May of 2020, begin the project before the end of the month and start producing chocolate by early July of 2020.

The other 51% of the company belongs to the De'Aruhuä Cacao Cooperative & Trust (in formation) through Ecology Crossroads who is legally responsible for the delivery, development and execution of project, providing management and oversight is our organization Globcal International.

The Piaroa recently brought us 2.9 metric tons of cocoa beans from the Amazon to the factory location in the city of Caracas, which will soon be under construction. In the coming months (now in less than 1 year) using state of the art stainless steel pots and high-impact chocolate molds the Piaroa will begin to make their own fine chocolate. Several members of the tribe will be attending bean-to-bar chocolate workshops in Venezuela to learn about making chocolate.

Its not unusual for Venezuela to offer such exquisitely good chocolate considering that it is believed the cacao tree holds its origins there, some say in the Orinoco basin which is where our chocolate originates. Different original cultivars and varieties of cacao are also grown throughout Venezuela. One of the oldest companies in Venezuela, Casa Franceschi has been growing and supplying cacao beans to European chocolate makers since 1830, they also have a genetic collection of different sub-species, varieties and strains used in the industry.

Chocolate is an excellent business, according to the Internet there will be over 130 billion dollars worth of chocolate sold this year worldwide, about 30 billion dollars of that is in the craft chocolate bar industry.

Chocolate as a Financial Solution for Globcal

Globcal International has been looking for a method of producing income without depending on donations and we think we found our way with chocolate as our fundraiser. For the past several years we have wanted to become more sustainable and earn a transparent income from our non-governmental activities, the problem has been that most of the programs we have offered are provided for those who have no money or in need our assistance. The time between program development and the effort it takes to subsequently raise funds often stalls or slows program formation.

The remedy is to have a constant source of funding (from business) so the organization can administer its programs quickly, efficiently and constantly develop new missions. Our involvement in the chocolate business will help us create such an annual funding source, fill social needs and being in a profitable business with the indigenous Piaroa tribe which will complement our international non-government organization profile with the United Nations.

Join Us as an Investor

We believe these are the best cocoa beans in the world, there are many factors that we can attribute to their taste and special flavor as well; unlike other cocoa beans these beans are from 'wild' forastero cacao trees, the trees do not receive any pesticides or chemical fertilizers, moreover they are harvested and cured using natural ecological methods.

Join our chocolate factory venture with the Piaroa tribe in a 'forest-to-bar' single-origin organic chocolate business. Our organization is providing operations and oversight management as well as operating the marketing/sales aspect of the business. Private shareholders and members are being accepted now by Ecology Crossroads, preferred shares are $10 each via Credit Card or by PayPal, investors can buy from 100 to 1,000 shares to become a shareholder or a member. You can read more about the opportunity online at the De'Aruhua Cacao website.

An invitation letter was delivered to all Globcal International members in late September several of them have signed onto the program development as investors or members including Maria Veneke-Ylikomi, Luis Cruz Diaz, Maya-Lis Wright, Nicholas Wright, Xi 'Alfred' Ng, Sonia Ceballos, and Clay Gordon; thank you all for joining the project. We are still expecting others to join us. You can learn more about the project and how the project came to be and how it is shaping up on their blog,

Monday, October 15, 2018

Fair-Trade Award Winning Coffee from India

Indigenous Indians Fight Deforestation Threat with Gourmet Coffee

Article by Rina Chandran, Reuters

Once forbidden by colonialists from cultivating coffee, indigenous people in southern India have won a prestigious award for their bean, which they farm while fighting deforestation.

Adivasi indigenous peoples harvesting coffee in the Araku Valley in India 

Araku Valley Coffee won gold in the Prix Epicures (Award) in Paris earlier this month. The beans are grown by Adivasis - or “original inhabitants” - of southern Andhra Pradesh state through a cooperative set up by the Naandi Foundation.

The organic farming model has benefited more than 45,000 Adivasi families, with profits from the high-grade coffee put into schools, healthcare and other needs of the remote community, according to Manoj Kumar, who founded Naandi.

The initiative has been a success because it built on the strong connection that Adivasis have to the forest, he said.

“They fully embraced the concept of biodynamic farming, because it is a holistic approach that benefits the eco-system, and is in tune with their traditional beliefs of caring for the community and the forest,” he said.

“This is not just about food security; it is also about pride in living without government handouts, and conserving the forest,” he told the Thomson Reuters Foundation over the phone.

The Adivasis are also countering deforestation by planting millions of mango, papaya and orange trees to provide shade for their coffee crops, as well as in other areas, with support from the Paris-based Global Livelihoods Funds.

While India has pledged to keep a third of its total land area under forest and tree cover, a growing population and increasing demand for land for mining and other industrial activities are placing greater stress on forests.

Activists say a new forest law favoring commercial plantations would undermine indigenous rights over forests and lead to more logging.

Coffee estates thrived in the Araku valley’s cool climate during the British colonial period, but Adivasis were prevented from growing it and did not take up the crop after independence, according to Kumar.

That changed after the Naandi Foundation began working in the region 18 years ago, first setting up schools and healthcare facilities, and then helping to organize a cooperative to farm and market coffee.

Araku Valley Coffee soon commanded high prices in global auctions, and opened its first cafe and shop last year in Paris.

But the real challenge for the Adivasis is not picking coffee beans the right shade of red or deciding on a marketing plan; they face a more existential threat as forests disappear, Kumar told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

“The Adivasis have such a deep spiritual connection with the land and the forest,” he said.

“Taking that away from them is taking away their life.”

Report (Article) by Rina Chandran @rinachandran. Editing by Jared Ferrie. Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, women's rights, trafficking, property rights and climate change. Visit news.trust.org to see more stories.

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Global Goals serve as a Doorway to the Future

Making the Universal Agenda Truly Universal

Director of the Sustainable Development Goals Fund

NEW YORK, Nov 17 2016 (IPS) - One of the key features of the 2030 Agenda which the United Nations and member states identified in the lead up to the SDG agreement was the principle of universality.

After managing to get the pivotal agreement on the global framework for the new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) agreed upon last year, it is now critical to continue this momentum and understand the opportunities and challenges it creates for the private sector as partners in sustainable development efforts.

Building on our interest to tip the scales and generate greater private sector engagement, the UN Sustainable Development Goals Fund (SDG Fund) in collaboration with its Private Sector Advisory Group and the Global Compact examined these questions through a new report, Universality and the SDGs: A Business Perspective. The report, launched last week highlights varied perspectives from both large and small companies working to understand the commonality of the new development agenda.

Universality in this context is defined by the UN as “applicable to all countries, while taking into account different national realities, capacities and levels of development that respect national policies and principles.” Thus the notion of Universality also envisions that everyone has a role to play in development and poverty alleviation efforts framing the development agenda.

The business community has, and continues to be deemed an important partner for us, serving as a critical economic engine and multiplier to catalyze economic and social development programs in our 23 joint programs around the world. The task at hand is to now reinforce this commitment and ensure that companies of all sizes and sectors are properly aware of the new SDGs.

To this end, the outcomes of the report were based on a year-long series of workshops and dialogues and reflected input from over 100 firms across a variety of regions and industry sectors. These findings stemming from countless interviews and in-depth questions were not unexpected and mainly in-line with our experience at the SDG Fund. We found that companies were keen to address the new set of goals which they viewed as critical to their core business activities, but many firms still struggled to fully understand the depth of the goals.

The report also mirrored some of our unique experience working with the private sector. For example, while many firms are already working in areas linked to the SDGs, this work is not always associated with the same “UN” or development language. In fact, many companies articulate the “global goals” using other mechanisms, including using other metrics or reporting based on environmental, social and corporate governance (ESG) indicators or other industry standards.

The new report offers some other useful findings. First, companies both small and large are increasingly aware of the concept of the SDGs, but many firms did not fully grasp the intricacies of the SDGs in context of their work or internal operations.

In addition, although many companies find a clear and added value to framing sustainability initiatives through the SDGs which provide a unified set of globally accepted principles–many companies are still accustomed to working within the confines of their philanthropic and CSR programs.

Despite a strong willingness to embrace the SDGs, many companies are exploring how to best integrate the SDGs into their work. But perhaps the most compelling case for the SDG Fund’s continued efforts to engage companies in a “co-design, co-invest and co-implement policy” is that the private sector remains eager to work on global challenges.

Companies continue to express their desire to be brought into the process to build innovative and robust multi-stakeholder partnerships at the local level and very often with UN partners.

Undoubtedly, with the one-year anniversary of the 2030 agenda approaching in January, this new report reminds us that the UN can and should play a more active role in educating and informing companies on the “universal” dimensions of the SDGs.

It is also important to continue to translate the new agenda into language and simplified reporting metrics that are palatable for businesses of all sizes – all of which means greater education on how companies can integrate the SDGs in their value chains, disseminate accessible resources and tools to promote learning, and support implementation and alignment across sectors.

In the end, the universality principle embedded in the SDGs provides a clear invitation for action and alignment to advance the new development agenda.

We hope to continue to raise public awareness and foster the much needed dialogue and advocacy required to encourage business to support the SDGs. In addition, our report highlights additional information on the ongoing work of the SDG Fund, including Private Sector Advisory Group case studies that continue to build the case for greater engagement in development, especially across sectors and with welcome actors like the private sector.

Source: -IPSNews

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Global Identity Principles (ID4D)

15 global organizations issue new principles for inclusive, secure identification in the developing world



In its ongoing effort to fight poverty, the World Bank has joined with a number of international partners, issuing a list of 10 key principles to ensure proper identification for citizens in the developing world, particularly with the aid of modern technology.

Entitled Principles on Identification for Sustainable Development: Towards a Digital Age, the new guidelines have been endorsed by a range of organizations from varying industries, including the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the United Nations Children’s Fund, and Mastercard.

The newly announced principles are part of a global effort to enable more inclusive and robust identification systems. The United Nations have targeted to provide legal identity for all, including birth registration, by 2030, and the guidelines look to help organizations do their part to achieve the UN’s Sustainable Development Goal.

“Given the size and complexity of the global identification gap, no single country, international organization, NGO, or private sector partner can surmount this challenge by working alone — coordination is needed at global, regional and national levels,” Vyjayanti Desai, ID4D program manager at World Bank Group, told One World Identity. “This effort is one step towards shaping a shared vision to advance progress globally.”


The list of 10 principles are broken in to three larger categories:
  • Inclusion, with the goal of universal coverage and accessibility
  • Design, aiming for robust, secure, responsive and sustainable methods of identity
  • Governance, building trust by protecting privacy and user rights
The principles were drawn up with the belief that every person has the right to participate fully in their society and economy. But full participation can be difficult without any verifiable proof of identity.
“No one should face the indignity of exclusion, nor be denied the opportunity to realize their full potential, exercise their rights, or share in progress,” the guidelines state. “No one should be left behind.”

Full details can be found in the full report, but the short list of 10 guiding principles are as follows:
  • Inclusion:
    • 1. Ensuring universal coverage for individuals from birth to death, free from discrimination.
    • 2. Removing barriers to access and usage and disparities in the availability of information and technology.
  • Design:
    • 3. Establishing a robust — unique, secure, and accurate — identity.
    • 4. Creating a platform that is inter-operable and responsive
      to the needs of various users.
    • 5. Using open standards and ensuring vendor and technology neutrality.
    • 6. Protecting user privacy and control through system design.
    • 7. Planning for financial and operational sustainability
      without compromising accessibility.
  • Governance:
    • 8. Safeguarding data privacy, security, and user rights through a comprehensive legal and regulatory framework.
    • 9. Establishing clear institutional mandates and accountability.
    • 10. Enforcing legal and trust frameworks though independent oversight and adjudication of grievances.
Republished from One World Identity (OWI) blog.

Tuesday, October 18, 2016

New Partnership Financing for SDGs

UN leader announces launch of new partnership platform to support financing for the Sustainable Development Goals

At UN Headquarters, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon addresses the High-level meeting on Financial Solutions for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). UN Photo/Amanda Voisard

10 October 2016 – Announcing the launch today of a new platform for scaling up innovative finance solutions to support the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said the initiative can help in identifying and piloting innovative finance instruments that can drive investment and support well thought-out SDG interventions.


“Financial actors and institutions are already beginning to develop solutions for attracting private capital in support of the 2030 Agenda [for Sustainable Development],” Mr. Ban told a meeting with high-level officials from Ministries of finance and foreign affairs, together with leaders from major global financial institutions at UN Headquarters today.

Titled 'Financial solutions for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs),' the gathering showcased the initiatives and examples from around the world on how best business and the financial services sector can engage in the SDG process and transform markets.

Mr. Ban said that the proposed multi-stakeholder Financial Innovation Platform would support the identification and piloting of innovative finance instruments, and would engage key development actors, including Governments, civil society, philanthropic organizations, entrepreneurs, institutional investors, banks, project developers and development finance institutions.


Mr. Ban, who will step down as the top UN official when his tenure ends on 31 December, expressed hope that the Platform will provide the best possible know-how to support the efforts by the incoming Secretary-General.

“Sustainability and stability of the financial system are mutually reinforcing,” he said, emphasizing the importance of reorienting existing financial flows to sustainable objectives so that investors will reap the benefits in the form of secure markets and thriving consumers.

That is why Governments, gathering in Addis Ababa in July 2015, adopted an an action agenda aimed at creating policy and regulatory environments that provide incentives for long-term and sustainable investments, he added.


According to Mr. Ban, the financial sector, spearheaded by companies such as Aviva, is promoting the creation of international benchmarks while the World Bank Treasury Office is issuing innovative financial instruments that are generating new investment opportunities.

Efforts are now needed to build on these initiatives, and the United Nations can play “a catalytic role” and intends to create a venue where leaders from all sectors, including government, can join forces, learn from each other and align their actions for greater collective effect, the Secretary-General said.

Many new ideas and solutions are already in play. International Housing Solutions, a global private equity investor, is using both catalytic and commercial capital investors to make green homes affordable to a wide population in Sub-Saharan Africa. CEO Michael Falcone said at the meeting that the creation of a UN platform will help to expand affordable green homes across the region.

“We are engaged in nothing less than the transformation of global capital markets,” said Mark Wilson, Group CEO of Aviva, an international insurance and investment company. “That demands major change. “If business isn't sustainable then society is at risk and if society isn't sustainable then business is at risk. So it's just enlightened self-interest for business to support the SDGs,” he said.


"While there are many pathways forward to achieve the SDGs, one thing is clear: business as usual is not an option to close the $2.5 trillion annual funding gap in developing countries alone," said Judith Rodin, President, The Rockefeller Foundation. "To realize the SDGs we need to foster a new era of collaboration and coordination, and the UN Secretary-General has unprecedented convening power to do this by bringing together leaders from different sectors,” she stressed.

The concept of a new multi-stakeholder forum to help finance progress on the Goals emerged following the 2015 Financing for Development Conference that took place in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. At that Conference, world leaders called for creative and innovative solutions by the private sector to scale-up investments in activities that contribute to the sustainable development.

It is now clear to many in the finance sector, that there are new demands of the marketplace as well as shareholders seeking sustainable investments. This is why a new framework for sustainable investing is needed. The know-how that is being made available within the finance sector will be shared and made accessible: the platform will accelerate solutions and encourage scale up.

For more information and to receive regular updates about the United Nations and the Sustainable Development Goals please subscribe to my personal Google News feed or you can subscribe to Globcal International's United Nations SDGs official syndicated feed. 

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Peace is More Popular than War

Download the Building Blocks for Peace poster.

Celebrate the International Day of Peace

On the International Day of Peace, 21 September 2016, let us create an effective teamwork for the betterment of our future, for the planet and for the human race.

We get daily reports on human rights abuses, violence, wars and injustice around the world. This is very sad facts, but we must continue to believe in the goodness of man. We must continue to believe that we all together can make a change.

Let us try to see all the people in the world as a big team where we all work together in a teamwork and make efforts to reach our common goals. This is what world leaders did in September 2015, when leaders from 193 countries came together at an historic UN Summit to sign the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

This agenda includes 17 different goals, The Sustainable Development Goals, as follows:
  • Goal 1: End poverty in all its forms everywhere.
  • Goal 2: End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture.
  • Goal 3: Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages.
  • Goal 4: Ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning.
  • Goal 5: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls.
  • Goal 6: Ensure access to water and sanitation for all.
  • Goal 7: Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all.
  • Goal 8: Promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth, employment and decent work for all.
  • Goal 9: Build resilient infrastructure, promote sustainable industrialization and foster innovation.
  • Goal 10: Reduce inequality within and among countries.
  • Goal 11: Make cities inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable.
  • Goal 12: Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns.
  • Goal 13: Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts.
  • Goal 14: Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources.
  • Goal 15: Sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, halt and reverse land degradation, halt biodiversity loss.
  • Goal 16: Promote just, peaceful and inclusive societies.
  • Goal 17: Revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development.

I think we all can agree that these are very important goals. With these goals in our mind, let us start to make common efforts for the betterment of our future. Each one of us is an important and necessary part of this teamwork. What we do counts. Small act or big act - it does not matter. The most important thing is that we all take action together. Action is needed to make things happen. Let us start today to spread awareness about these 17 Sustainable Development Goals. These are our goals for a better future for us all. Our goals for a better future for our planet, which we all desperately depend on. Let us take care of each other and protect all living creatures!

Global Citizenship

for the sake of Peace

I would like to take this occasion to promote Global Citizenship, because I believe in Global Citizenship for the sake of peace. There have been too many nationalist communities in the human history, leading to decline and destruction. This is one of the reasons why I believe in Global Citizenship as our global solution. The Global Citizenship Registry is a program initiated by David Wright and Globcal International. It is a program where we all have the chance to come together in a big, global family, where we all share our responsibility for our planet and our human race. We all have our universal human rights in common. Each member of this great big family is an equal. We believe that intercultural understanding, tolerance, nonviolence and mutual respect all are important building stones in our big mosaic of peace.

Our Global Citizenship program is developed to work in partnership with the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. Global Citizenship has become our vehicle for attaining them. Every single one who is signing up for the Global Citizenship Registry get access to a great amount of educational and informational material. And education is, as we all know, of great importance for lasting peace.

By signing the Global Citizenship Pledge, we promise:
to maintain a neutral worldview free of religious, political, national, racial or tribal favoritism or discrimination.
to promote intercultural understanding, tolerance, nonviolence and mutual respect.
to promote a global ethic of citizenship and shared responsibility.
to work for the full implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals.
to protect the planet from degradation, including through sustainable consumption and production and sustainably managing its natural resources.
to take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts.
to protect human rights and promote equality.
to live in peace and harmony with all other citizens and settlements.

The Sustainable Development Goals: Building Blocks for Peace


The International Day of Peace is observed on 21 September. The day’s theme for 2016 is “The Sustainable Development Goals: Building Blocks for Peace.” Every single one of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals is a building block in the global architecture of peace. The United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s message for the day is:

“The people of the world have asked us to shine a light on a future of promise and opportunity. Member States have responded with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development… It is an agenda for people, to end poverty in all its forms. An agenda for the planet, our common home. An agenda for shared prosperity, peace and partnership. “

In the society of today, we face many challenges such as poverty, hunger, diminishing natural resources, water scarcity, social inequality, human rights abuses, violence, environmental degradation, diseases, corruption, racism and xenophobia. Every single one of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals can be seen as solutions to overcome these challenges. Let us use the blocks to build our peaceful society today. We are all in this fragile world together. We need to protect our planet and take good care of each other.

May Peace prevail on Earth.

Article by Maria Veneke Ylikomi, Goodwill Ambassador, Globcal International

Monday, September 05, 2016

Align your Business with the SDGs

Is Your Business Aligned with the U.N. Sustainable Development Goals?

By Clinton Moloney and Don Reed, Triple Pundit Correspondents

2015 was a pivotal year in turning the tide on major sustainability issues. One of the key drivers of this shift was the release of the United Nations’ (U.N.) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) last fall, aimed to propel the business community and the whole world to align their corporate strategies to help make real progress on social, economic and environmental issues for years to come.

The 17 SDGs make up a cohesive environmental and social sustainability vision that serves as a call-to-action for governments, civil society, and businesses to rethink their core strategies, missions and values and contribute to these goals in an overall effort to have positive, lasting contributions to our quality of life and our planet.

Everyone within a civil society agrees with the 17 basic goals.

The SDGs will function as a vehicle that will allow businesses to find the intersection between where they can contribute to society and their core business values and purpose. And at a fundamental level, a business that is operating in a way that is aligned to solving major societal challenges will be more resilient over the long term. Companies are usually clear on the positive impacts they’re already having on society. The SDGs offer a new lens to look at and communicate the social issues they currently have the most bearing on, and where they may fall short.

Global expectations are already high for the SDGs, but what about the perception among U.S. businesses? For one, there’s a high awareness level among U.S. corporations – recent PwC research found that more than 90 percent of businesses are familiar with the SDGs. Moreover, companies are already considering their own impact on the SDGs with some 40 percent planning to conduct an annual review to assess that impact.

Businesses have a real opportunity to turn the complexity of the global goals as part of their overall corporate strategy. But what are the best practices and processes for supporting the SDGs and kicking off the process of embedding them into their fundamental business framework?

We’ve identified four key steps companies need to take to commence successful engagement with the SDGs:
Determine the impact your business and its value chain have on each of the SDGs, both directly and indirectly. Governments may have different priorities for the SDGs, so for global companies, it’s critical to understand in detail each country’s priorities where business operates.

Agree on the methodology and measure your business impact across all these SDGs. Data and analytics can help you understand where your business has a positive or negative impact on each SDG. There are tools available that can help provide total impact measurement.

Incorporate the learnings from your measurement into business planning and strategy to prioritize reducing negative impacts and increasing the positive. This will lead to the ability to prove your role in the SDGs.
Communicate your business goals and achievements consistently with the SDGs. Outside of sustainability reports, these impacts should be integrated into overall company communications such as annual reports, SEC filings and customer communications.

Many companies are looking to adopt the goals that are the most relevant to their businesses and where they can contribute the most to society, as well as areas where they are able to engage their stakeholders. For example, a pharmaceutical company may concentrate on good health and well-being (goal No. 3), while a major consumer brand that targets female retailers may start with its impact on women and equality (No. 5).

Aligning specific SDGs to business growth strategy works well as long as companies understand where they have impacts across all the goals – positive or negative – and can gain a complete perspective of their sustainability opportunities. And after corporations get a handle on communicating the issues where they already have known business value and positive impact in SDG terms, they can move on to uncover new opportunities to have an impact in other areas.

Making a smooth transition to this new model where SDGs play a central role in operational considerations as well as planning, reporting and strategy could make all the difference in helping to achieve the SDGs.

Image credit: United Nations

Clinton Moloney is PwC’s U.S. Sustainable Business Solutions Advisory Leader
Don Reed is a Managing Director in PwC’s U.S. Sustainable Business Solutions Practice

Friday, August 26, 2016

Human Empowerment through Cooperation

Making the Cooperative the Ideal Business Model

The ideal of the 'cooperative' was first developed in the 1820s, long before privately held corporations by individuals, based on the development of the free and fair exchange of legally held assets through common ownership of a business or distribution system designed to benefit its members who collectively own the institution as a society. The non-profit and for profit co-operative embodiment today has become a solid institutional part of the corporate laws of many countries while in other countries that depend on the concept of international cooperation from other nations have yet to allow the concept of an employee owned business or corporation to emerge in their legal systems. Cooperatives are tax-free and generally protected by governments as social orders within the area of human and civil rights in addition to being legal businesses.

Cooperatives empower communities.
Cooperatives are and remain to be the safest, most sustainable and lowest-risk type of an investment an individual can make because the foundation of the cooperative involve intangible assets, membership involves special rights, privileges and benefits that are available through belonging. In a cooperative members in essence belong to one another equally and are responsible for perpetuating the cooperatorship. Globcal International has developed the first international cooperatorship that is truly non-governmental because it is formed as a non-state actor and bases its jurisdiction in the offshore international realm of the high-seas under admiralty, maritime and international law.

What you choose to follow or be a part of in life is generally based solely in your personal character and personality, but we do know that, once people begin to realize the potential of cooperatives and the benefits that are possible they will always cherish their cooperative memberships with our global development and by being a part of cooperatives locally in their own communities, cooperatives are security. Cooperatives are known for being socially responsible, fair, fraternal, equal and democratic. They are also designed to distribute benefits and profits equally to members. Commentary by David J. Wright

For information regarding the reformation of your business for the international sector or remove your state of incorporation or to offshore your personal character and intellectual property to a tax-free jurisdiction, then join us at Globcal International as a non-state citizen, then see the membership link on our blog.

Scaling Up Cooperatives to Reach the Sustainable Development Goals

Article: Huffington-Post

Cooperatives are Naturally the Best Way to promote the SDGs

Cooperatives empower women.
Long before Uber or Airbnb, cooperatives capitalized on a sharing economy, but with an explicit mission to share benefits with everyone in society, especially the poor and vulnerable. Cooperatives have a storied history and carry distinct advantages in addressing the needs of low-income people. They rely on sharing information and trust in communities around a common purpose.

Over the decades, cooperatives have had success in areas like savings, agriculture, housing, or distribution of electricity. While there have been many improvements, they have faced challenges in areas such as tax policy, discriminatory regulation, achieving scale, and prevailing business attitudes toward their mission and business model.

To achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) — a set of 17 global goals which seek to end poverty by 2030, promote peace, and preserve the planet for future generations — we need to take advantage of the power of cooperatives. The SDGs fit nicely under the umbrella of the World Bank Group’s twin goals of ending poverty by 2030 and promoting shared prosperity.

The work is daunting, particularly in the area of financial inclusion. In 2014, only 62 percent of the world’s adult population had a financial account - leaving 2 billion adults without one.

Cooperative Financial Institutions (or CFI’s) include savings and credit cooperatives, credit unions, financial cooperatives, as well as savings and loan associations. They are key strategic partners in achieving both the goals of universal financial access, ending extreme poverty. They have low operating costs and are located in remote, rural areas with no financial institutions.

Yet for many of these member-owned institutions, scaling up savings services is impaired by challenges related to management and staff capacity, governance, and oversight and supervision. Some financial cooperatives and credit unions cannot safely lend funds received as deposits due to lack of credit capacity and systems.

We can help financial cooperatives scale-up by supporting them with technical advice and new technology to help them share data and information with their clients and with development practitioners. They can also benefit from active global partnerships with multilateral institutions, non-governmental organizations, and the private sector.

CFIs are one of the main providers of financial services to low-income people, with 700 million members and accountholders worldwide. CFIs have large constituencies in India, China, Indonesia, Brazil, Mexico, Kenya, Morocco, and over 35 smaller developing countries such as Togo and Haiti.

Last year, the World Bank Group’s private sector arm, the IFC, had an estimated $500 million of investments in CFIs around the world. The World Bank Group has been active for decades in this area. Some of the most notable programs include the Indian Dairy Cooperative, which has created an estimated 250,000 jobs, mostly in rural areas. Similarly, Mexico’s National Savings and Financial Services Bank has helped strengthen savings and credit institutions that serve millions of rural residents, who would otherwise have been relegated to the margins of the formal financial sector.

The World Bank Group’s policy teams have helped governments supervise and regulate cooperative financial institutions. For example, in 2009, the Bank Group worked with Rwanda to strengthen both the supervision and reach of Savings and Credit Cooperatives. By mid-2012 financial access in Rwanda increased from 47 percent to 72 percent. The newly created savings and credit cooperatives played an important role in this increase since they operated in 215 rural locations in which no financial institution existed previously. And the partnership with Rwanda also significantly increased the financial sustainability of the savings and credit cooperatives.

In a more mobile and urban world, cooperatives must adapt, while maintaining their basic values and approach. As seen in Sub-Saharan Africa, mobile money accounts can drive financial inclusion. While just 1 percent of adults globally say they use a mobile money account and nothing else, in Sub-Saharan Africa, 12 percent of adults (64 million adults) have mobile money accounts (compared to just 2 percent worldwide); 45 percent of them have only a mobile money account. Mobile money accounts can help narrow the gap in financial inclusion between men and women, which could have important effects on inequality and child welfare. CFIs will have to stay abreast of these developments and exploit these new technologies to maximize financial inclusion, particularly for the poor.

Capitalizing on cooperatives’ successes and learning from their mistakes can help us expand the menu of options as we search for more inclusive and sustainable models of development, and new ways of building and sharing knowledge. In this way we can significantly contribute to our common goal of ending extreme poverty in a single generation.

Republished from the Huffington Post, Scaling Up Cooperatives to Reach the Sustainable Development Goals by Mahmoud Mohieldin Senior Vice President for the 2030 Development Agenda, UN Relations and Partnerships

Friday, July 29, 2016

New Jobs being created by the SDGs

How the SDGs have Changed Global Development Jobs

In a recent blog, FHI 360 CEO Patrick Fine observed: “It is time to recognize that human development challenges will exist as long as there are humans … Building resilience is a long-term endeavor that requires ongoing commitment. It is not an end state.”


Girls skipping at a primary school participating in Plan's menstrual health management program. Photo by: Nyani Quarmyne

He was pushing back on that old adage in our international development industry that our organizations are (or should be) working themselves out of a job. As he concluded, there will always be a job for “strong, capable civil society actors.”

I agree with Patrick. There will always be a job. But is it the job we are currently configured to do?

The Sustainable Development Goals have changed that job in profound ways, and most development organizations have not recognized it and are not ready. Recall that the SDGs, in contrast to the Millennium Development Goals, are not just targets designed and agreed to by experts (mostly in the “developed” world) and handed to “poor” and “developing” countries. They are 17 sets of goals that apply universally to every country. And in large part they have come from, have been consulted with and agreed to, by a broad range of stakeholders in almost every country.

If the SDGs are not someone else’s agenda but an agenda vetted and embraced by local actors, the role of international civil society entities like Plan is not — or not just — to provide solutions, sage advice and expertise, but to strengthen the social accountability fabric.

Doing this well means we need to get out of the business of leading and doing and into the business of empowering, capacity building, informing, and connecting.

It means humility, because the voice and the brand that counts is not ours.

It means giving up control. Our job is to create safe and brave spaces for the voices of the vulnerable, the invisible, to ensure the marginalized are heard and to strengthen social accountability structures so their rights are served.

Let’s take Sustainable Development Goal 5, on gender equality, with which Plan International, the organization I represent, is deeply involved. Over the past five years Plan has been leading its Because I am a Girl campaign, focused on getting girls to go and stay in school. In the context of this campaign we did many things — from building infrastructure such as classrooms, wells and separate toilet facilities for girls to providing key products and services including menstrual hygiene management products, teacher training and technology.

In the course of the campaign we learned that the most impactful initiatives we could undertake to support this aim was to empower women and the girls themselves — building their awareness, developing their capacity and self-confidence, expanding their network of peers and mentors, so that they could effectively advocate for their own rights to go and stay in school. In other words, we learned that the most effective agents for energizing and mobilizing governments and communities to invest in girls are the girls themselves.

We are also learning that to be effective in empowering girls and youth we very much need to transform ourselves. We cannot be an organization that is seeking to empower the voice to children and girls if we were not first willing to give a voice to children and youth within our organization. And this has been challenging. Adults are not predisposed to listen to children and young people; we do not like giving up control. But empowering children and youth means being willing to give up control and being willing to open the space for children and youth to influence your own and your organization’s thinking about program design and execution.

At Plan we have changed our structures and staffing from top to bottom to make sure we are not crowding out the voice of children, youth and girls. We have made space in our board rooms for youth. We have invested in staff with expertise in youth engagement and we have trained our staff and board to work and engage with youth in non-tokenistic ways. We involve our youth in the design and evaluation of our programs. We have developed protocols and procedures to help ensure the safety of children and youth advocates when they speak out.

Bottom line: International civil society entities like Plan have an important role to play in in the SDG journey, here in the U.S. and elsewhere. But the SDGs changed the game for all of us.

Remaining relevant requires we give up control so that we may effectively empower others. Remaining relevant requires we transform ourselves so that we can support social transformation. The old paradigm was about external actors pushing harder to increase the short-term results. In the new paradigm, in order to yield more, we actually have to yield more control, responsibility and resources to local leadership.

Reposted from Devex Blog. Join the Devex community and access more in-depth analysis, breaking news and business advice — and a host of other services — on international development, humanitarian aid and global health.

By Tessie San-Martin, president and CEO of Plan International USA. She is a seasoned executive with more than 25 years’ experience helping to address gaps in education, economic growth, capacity-building, corporate governance, political reform and labor policy globally.

Friday, July 15, 2016

Human Rights Central to Global Agenda

Reigniting Commitments to Human Rights

Anarchists, non-state actors, international NGOs, corporations and governments themselves must all embrace, respect and understand the international ideals of human rights to become responsible and sustainable. Zero tolerance for human rights violators must exist universally. There are no legal guidelines for the ownership of a human individual except through their own voluntary service as a citizen of a nation, employee of a corporation or as a member of a civil society.

Human rights are not ‘Abstract Ideas,’ must be main tool in meeting development targets – Ban

12 July 2016 – Far greater emphasis must be placed on human rights as the international community continues to work towards implementing the agreed-upon sustainable development agenda, because it is the most powerful driver of peace and development, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said today.

“Human rights are norms and standards, against which institutions and Governments are measured. But they are not just abstract ideas, or aspirations to be addressed once peace and development have been attained. They call for extremely specific and concrete actions on the part of States and other authorities,” the Secretary-General said at the opening of a High-Level Thematic Debate of the General Assembly on human rights at the center of the global agenda, taking place today and tomorrow at UN Headquarters in New York.

“In our deeply connected world, all Member States have a shared best interest in promoting individual and collective human rights as a basis for global peace and prosperity,” the Secretary-General added.

The thematic debate consists of an opening segment, a plenary debate with ministerial-level participation, and interactive segments focusing on tackling discrimination and inequalities, strengthening governance, the rule of law and access to justice; and enabling active participation in society. Among the participants are high-level representatives from States, the UN system, regional organizations, human rights bodies and mechanisms, civil society, think tanks and the private sector.

International human rights norms being eroded, warns UN chief

In his remarks, the UN chief highlighted that while much of the world is benefiting from enormous progress in their economic, social, cultural, civil, and political situations, at the same time, racism and homelessness are rising in Europe; organized violence has taken root in parts of Latin America; deadly conflict continues in the Middle East; and economic, social and political marginalization affect millions of people in Asia.

“Some governments are sharply restricting people’s ability to exercise their rights, attacking fundamental freedoms and dismantling judicial institutions that limit executive power. Others are detaining and imprisoning human rights defenders and clamping down on civil society and non-governmental organizations, preventing them from performing their vital work,” the UN chief said.

At the same time, Mr. Ban said, respect for international human rights and humanitarian law is being eroded, as the world faces the highest numbers of people displaced by conflict since the World War II and abuses continue against civilians who are starved, denied humanitarian aid and prevented from moving to places of safety.

“When does this end?” he asked, adding: “The answer must be that it ends now. Governments must meet their responsibilities. The foremost tool for this change is human rights – the most powerful driver of peace and development.”



Noting that Member States have already made a “tremendous step forward” by unanimously agreeing in 2015 on the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the Secretary-General also said that he launched the Human Rights Up Front initiative in late 2013 as a way to bring together the three pillars of the UN – peace and security, development and human rights – to ensure that human rights concerns are prioritized, and to bring the Charter back to the forefront of the daily activities of the entire UN system.
Human rights ‘at the heart’ of UN 2030 Agenda

“Human rights are at the heart of the seventeen Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), from ending poverty to reducing inequality and promoting peaceful and inclusive societies,” the Secretary-General said.

“In this crucial first year of implementation, let us recognize the need for far greater emphasis on human rights across all our work,” he added.

Furthermore, the Secretary-General said that the evidence in country after country over many years shows that repressive policies against violent extremism and terrorism make nobody safe.

“When Governments undertake actions under the guise of counter-terrorism that disregard human rights, they reinforce feelings of exclusion and grievance, increase resentment and fuel extremism and terrorism around the world,” Mr. Ban said.

In that vein, the Secretary-General said that his Plan of Action to Prevent Violent Extremism makes clear that preventing extremism and promoting human rights go hand-in-hand.

“Human rights offer States a clear path towards stability and prosperity. They build confidence and loyalty, as well as thriving political and economic institutions,” Mr. Ban said. “They are an indispensable part of our quest for a safer and more stable world, with dignity for all.”

Assembly President urges world leaders to ‘reignite’ commitment to human rights

Also speaking at the opening of the debate was General Assembly President Mogens Lykketoft, who highlighted that less than a year ago, all 193 Member States of the Assembly had adopted the 2030 Agenda, providing hope that the world could be transformed for the better.

“But if today’s leaders do not reignite their commitment to human rights; reject the rhetoric of division and hate; and address the drivers of today’s tensions – joblessness, inequalities, climate change, and abuses of power – then that hope will quickly give way to despair,” he stressed.

For its part, the thematic debate serves as an opportunity to examine the UN’s own shortcomings in the area of human rights, and to understand how the emphasis on human rights in the 2030 Agenda and the recent reviews on peace and security impact on the Organization’s overall approach to the subject.

“We must not allow the culture of human rights that has been created these past seventy years to unravel,” Mr. Lykketoft said.

“In addition to the efforts of individual Member States and others, we must ensure that the United Nations, 70 years after its founding, continues to be a bulwark against threats to human rights,” he added.

Republished from UN News Center

Monday, June 06, 2016

Pros and Cons of Global Citizenship

Global Citizenship: A Diverse Concept

Now that the world has begun to change (radically and quickly) with the new globalization movement of a corporate world based on best practices, transparency, accountability and credibility to foster the ideal world we want to see under the ideals of a sustainable planet with the United Nations and the Global Goals; the role of the human being and our identity is also being redefined.

On April 18th, 2016 the Universal Declaration on Human Rights was revised and improved to meet the needs of the human being and our role as the residents of the planet and the Global Citizenship Commission was introduced to expand our rights as human beings and participants of a healthy planet.

"We belong to the earth, the earth does not belong to us!" -Ambassador Col. David J. Wright

DPI/NGO Conference on Global Citizenship held in Korea

A global education action agenda affirming the importance of Sustainable Development Goal 4 – ensuring inclusive and equitable quality education and promoting lifelong opportunities for all – was adopted in Gyeongju, Republic of Korea.

Speaking from the podium at the 66th United Nations Department of Public Information (DPI)/Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) Conference, Ms. Cristina Gallach, UN Under-Secretary-General for Communications and Public Information, said “This Conference has demonstrated another example of the value for the United Nations in investing in partnership with academia and NGOs.”

The Gyeongju Action Plan provides concrete guidance for NGOs around the world to enhance their ability to lobby governments to commitment to implementing the Sustainable Sustainable Development Goals and mobilize NGOs in communities on the ground.

“The United Nations is committed to continue to support and partner with NGOs and academia in our joint efforts to advocate for and successfully implement the 2030 Agenda,” Ms. Gallach continued.

The newly adopted Action Plan includes a series of concrete measures for NGOs around the world to jump-start implementation of the 2030 Agenda at the grass roots level.

Dr. Scott Carlin, Conference Co-chair and Associate Professor of Geography at Long Island University, said “NGOs from around the world brought passion and expertise to lively final consultations on the outcome document. We are grateful for all of the inputs received and very proud of the Gyeongju Action Plan.”

“We hope that Gyeongju was an inspirational setting for finalizing a truly unifying action plan that will be useful for NGOs, wherever they are working,” added Co-Chair Dr.Yukang Choi.

First Youth Declaration

For the first time in the history of the DPI/NGO Conference, youth also developed and issued a Youth Declaration.

Ms. Gallach pointed out that youth had “come in great numbers, demonstrating the value that they see in partnering with the United Nations.”

Ahmad Alhendawi, the Secretary-General's Envoy on Youth, noted “the Conference not only reinforced the critical role of NGOs to achieve a vision for the 2030 Agenda, but also stressed the urgency for greater investments in education for Global Citizenship to unlock the potential of this massive generation of children and youth.”

“Unfortunately youth are still not involved enough in policy making processes around the world,” said Ms. Saphira Rameshfar, representative of the Baha'i Community and Conference youth leader.

“The Youth Declaration is a necessary reminder that young people are needed as leaders and decision-makers not only in youth forums and special-purpose councils, but in those spaces where the course and direction of society as a whole are determined,” added Ms. Rameshfar.

The Action Plan was drafted through a global multi-stakeholder consultation process, leading up to, and during the conference. It was adopted at the Conference's final plenary session and will be shared widely with civil society as well as the UN Secretary-General, the UN System, Member States and learning communities.

Related Articles

There are a number of relative articles and ideals that can be investigated and explored that justify the ideal world where fairness and collective prosperity can be understood. Please delve into them and learn more about our future as global citizens.

DPI/NGO Global Citizenship Conference Highlights (video summary on Facebook)
Conference Action Plan
Ban Ki-moon's Statements from the Conference

Friday, December 18, 2015

Meet the Women in Charge of Change

When we are talking about votes the following female leaders of Globcal International often have the final word or the morale of the organization could become unbalanced as a civil society; so when we develop programs we need to ensure their best interests are at heart ethically, morally and aesthetically. This is one aspect of our organization that makes it more attractive to a cooperative audience, the ladies!

Role Models for Change

Ambassadors Deborah Levine, Dame Karen Cantrell, Maria Veneke Ylikomi, Dr. Sonia Ceballos and Ricki Landers all serve the organization as founders and commissioners and have all been involved since 2009. While we were full of growing pains, the Most Venerable Meena Persad joined us to help develop an embassy in Guyana and create funding sources for an orphanage she is developing there. Then just last month the Honorable Ricki Landers of Tennessee joined us to offer technical and expert support involving the social media.

Deborah Levine

Deborah Levine is a cross-cultural communication expert, an award-winning author and a writing coach, passionate about cultural diversity in this world. Her great interest for cultural diversity work started to grow already in childhood as she grew up in one of few Jewish families in British Bermuda.

Deborah is an entrepreneur and innovator of multiple projects that share and teach cultural diversity. The American Diversity Report (americandiversityreport.com) received the 2013 Champion of Diversity Award from diversitybusiness.com. The Women’s Council on Diversity (womengroundbreakers.com) received the Excellence Award from the Tennessee Economic Council on Women.With degrees in cultural anthropology and urban planning, Deborah is a cross-cultural trainer whose clients include government, corporations, education organizations, and healthcare institutions. Her creative cross-cultural teaching strategies are outlined in her textbook, "Matrix Model Management System: Guide to Cross-Cultural Wisdom".


Karen Cantrell

Karen Cantrell is a successful entrepreneur and founder of Lady Golf. When it comes to empowering women in different parts of the world, Karen is very enthusiastic. She is among a great deal of other things involved in empowering women in for example India, Brazil, Africa, UK, European Union and Venezuela. Karen Cantrell is the International Vice President of several different organizations that are making great efforts for the empowering of women.

Karen Cantrell's educational background is of such, a Doctor of Humane Letters from Becket Theological Institute in Canterbury, England, for her great service to create peace, harmony, fraternity, understanding and tolerance. She is truly committed to seeing that those in need receive the best possible help available. Karen has voluntarily offered her services to humankind her entire life. Her actions speak for themselves. Karen's dedication, compassion, and generosity have made an incredible and positive difference in the lives of both people and animals.


Maria Veneke Ylikomi


Maria Veneke Ylikomi works as a language consultant. She enjoys writing and has among other things written a book about the four felines jaguar, tiger, lion and leopard in cooperation with the wildlife photographer Jan Fleischmann. Maria has studied at Lund University in Sweden, mainly within humanities and languages. Maria is administrator of International Observances and registrar for the Global Citizenship Registry. In 2014 Maria was commissioned a Kentucky Colonel.

Maria's great interest in traveling and curiosity about other cultures has brought her to more than 30 different countries (in Asia, Africa, North America and Europe). Her time spent as a volunteer at an orphanage in war-torn Cambodia is one of the circumstances that has led Maria to dedicate a part of her time to the non-profit organization Globcal International. As a Goodwill Ambassador, Maria is able to collaborate with other professional colleagues to promote humanitarian issues, environmental issues, human rights and peace.


Sonia Ceballos

Sonia Ceballos was born in Caracas, Venezuela and came by destiny into traveling and dealing with people around the world, She has studied psychology at the Central University of Venezuela and is always concerned about social issues, She first became involved in social work with youth at risk in the Caracas slums, and then she started to help minorities, such as indigenous peoples of Venezuela, with ecological and social protection and education. She is a great and warmhearted defender of human rights.

Dr. Sonia Ceballos currently works as the manager of Fundo Ekobius, which is a real functional and self-sustainable cooperative. It is an organization that has a clear focus on naturalism, ecology, indigenous knowledge and environmental enhancement. Sonia is collaborating in the area of psychology in various philanthropic projects through Globcal International. She is interested in personal development. Without political bias Sonia is a loyal fan of the trade union, and opportunities for all.


Meena Persad

Meena Persad is an Ambassador for Globcal International and Goodwill Ambassadors of the World representative for Guyana in New York City. She is a mother of four children, and have two degrees: a Bachelor of Arts in Business, and a Masters Degree in Human Resource Management and Finance.

Meena Persad has always had a passion for writing and has written the book ”Classic Bible Stories for Children”. She hopes that the book can help children to live with a sense of morality, and that it will touch their hearts so they can live with dignity. "If children live with honesty, love, and respect for themselves and others, it will make a big difference in our society today", says Meena. She is passionate about helping children in need especially in Guyana, where she has an orphanage. She loves to help the children to reach their highest potential. Meena would be delighted to be able to donate books to children in orphanages around the world, so that children can have a chance to educate themselves.



Ricki Landers

Ricki Landers joined Globcal International last month. She is a web designer, graphic designer, and Search Engine Optimization expert. She is a mother of three children and a wife of 26 years. Ricki has a vast educational background; she has a Master of Fine Arts and a Bachelor of Science and an Associate of Science in Digital Design and Web Development.

Ricki Landers has owned several successful businesses and she has been a public speaker, and a professional radio and TV broadcaster. She is an author and a travel writer with a focus on sustainable tourism. She does most of her work in marketing and online marketing is her great specialty. She is a dedicated human rights advocate and has led many international campaigns using social media. Ricki freelances for companies who are seeking to increase their revenue and brand awareness. She is now working on several projects that will work to bring sustainable and environmentally friendly food and housing to areas that are in desperate need of both.

Other Members

We also have several women who work with us as volunteer ambassadors who have helped periodically to promote events with us online: Astrid, Irmgard, Lakshmi, Hira, Sahro, Maya-Lis, and Nikija, We will present them all soon in an upcoming article in January about our volunteerism program.

Friday, October 30, 2015

Cooperative Registry of Global Citizens

Certificate of State Ownership
(Personal Birth Certificate)
Our ideals of citizenship and who we should serve as individuals in a civil sense are getting an upgrade over the next five years. As I have confirmed there are speculators and social engineers at the heart of this meddling with human rights and changing how to better exploit human capitalism.

New Registry Collaborates the UN SDGs

The projects of the United Nations SDGs (Global Goals) have come center stage and become the new fuel for the global mainstream. The goals have immersed all our nations, religious institutions, corporations, and political systems to universally agree to make our priority the adoption and implementation of these 17 common goals on a global scale through international cooperation, corporate cooperation, and our independent national policy to become sustainable.

On September 25th at the UN Headquarters in New York City all of the world leaders (193 of them) agreed to the SDGs (Sustainable Development Goals). At the same time they discussed and made the ideal of global citizenship a reality for those who work and live internationally.

For as long as we have known, we have always been citizens of our states or nations making us distinctly different based on our place of origin more than race. Through globalization by international corporations (entrusted through their nations) the nation as an entity has become smaller and less powerful than its own corporate citizens. Now the playing field of our civil society model and reality 'opens up again' with the SDGs and the facilitation of the world meeting the 17 Global Goals.

So now today the ideal has become to allow the corporate bodies operated and or founded by the masses (people like you and me) control and operate the planet as corporate global citizens under a strict set of laws that govern the ecosystem and economy which are becoming one in the same. It's a good deal for the United States where 41% of the 200 greatest world economies including nations, are controlled by 82 US corporations. They need to be nice and diplomatic though because China is a major US stakeholder in everything, they always have been even before they loaned 14 trillion to the US in 2008 and 2009.

A Registry of Global Citizens

Based on learning how wrong some of these ideals could end up for us humans who are not corporations and dislike the ideals of global capitalism, we became inspired to become the meek who shall inherit earth through a cooperative development involving global citizenship and personal identification, it all begins with the first official registry for those digital citizens who are non-aligned politically with their countries that want to take on global citizenship.

We began the development of a neutral non-governmental civil registry in mid-2013 preparing for the next step in the evolution of our global civil society beyond the Millennium Development Goals which were thus-far successful in their scope, to further prepare for the new next steps (SDG)s in globalizing our homo-ecologically sustainable idealism (consciousness) among one another, which begins now on January 01, 2016.

We developed the registry as a way for people to duly declare that they are global citizens and that wish to be recognized with global citizenship not-withstanding their country or political state of origin based on their personal social, academic and digital identity. Global citizens must declare that they are politically neutral (non-aligned) and share in the philosophy of the the ideals of global, universal, and or world citizenship. Signing the registry does not require a person to renounce their civil, state, or national citizenship which is protected by the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

On October 9th the registry began to inscribe names of those who wish to become known as global citizens in service to all of mankind and the planet, rather than only from within their country of residence. The application form is very simple and straight forward, all those who join will receive a certificate, a registry identification number, and will be invited to participate in the formation of a new international global citizenship cooperative as an offshore charitable international foundation.

The cooperative formation initiative promises transparency, integrity, and accountability in creating social responsibility and sustainability among its members and those who participate within the program. Equality in democratic consensus, equal investment, equal participation, and equal opportunity. One person, one share, one voice, one vote!

To better understand the ideal and benefits of our programs please follow our blog and see some of our previous articles. To sign the registry to become a global citizen now, click here.

Friday, October 23, 2015

Taking Measures to Assist Europe's New Residents

Globcal International is an organization that takes a very serious view on all matters relative to human rights and our great civilization. Currently we are involved in the development of a global program involving citizenship alternatives for those who have been marginalized by the system, those who live and work internationally, and for those who have had enough of the day-in-day-out nation-state politics based in envy, plunder, racism, and greed resulting in societies that were built on discrimination and nationalism (most national governments).

Preparing Europe for Global Citizenship

Goodwill Ambassadors Karen Cantrell and
Antonino Landi meeting in Palermo, Sicily 
Over the past 20 years those responsible for the changes that are occurring in our society (people like you, me and others) have been focused on creating a global society that is rooted in fairness, best practices, equality, peace and sustainability. We have all had our ideals challenged by organizations influenced by their sponsors seeking an advantage over these horizons including religious institutions and nation-states that seek to possess and control the world, its riches, people and their advantage through corrupt controls.

In late September we took on and adopted a 'new deal' with new goals proposed by world leaders who unanimously agreed at the United Nations under the framework of a 15 year plan to revolutionize our great civilization eliminating poverty, bringing equality to humanity, and saving the planet from global warming and climate change. They labelled the world-wide program the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG)s for those who work within the framework and nicknamed the project the Global Goals.

Our organization is delighted with the Global Goals as a way to bring equality to our planet and the people who inhabit it; however there are many issues and a great deal of resistance from those who want to retain their brute force control over the humanity. The pain and toil that built their nations over the years combined with organizations and corporations corruptly invested in country economies are at the helm of the disagreements. Despite the resistance of the shift toward a globalized world, the world leaders including monarchs and those elected democratically have all (193 of 196) agreed to the changes proposed by the 17 SDGs with 169 prime targets over the next 15 years.

Clearing the Way for Refugee and Migration Services

In an effort to better prepare our projects for implementation and development we had to take a first hand look to examine the crisis situations around the world especially those which involve discrimination. To accomplish this we needed to depend on our ambassadors in Europe to provide their first hand experience with the refugee crisis there. Coincidentally our goodwill ambassador, Princess Karen Cantrell traveled to Europe on October 13 and has taken time to meet with other Globcal International ambassadors regarding the refugee and migration issue.

Ambassador Cantrell is an executive council member and co-founder of Globcal International, she is the key person in the administration and development of the Hospitallers Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem (HOSLJ), a philanthropic charity and priory of the Roman Catholic Church located in the United States. During her trip she has shared some critical viewpoints and first hand knowledge relative to the refugee crisis in an effort to provide Globcal International better understanding over the issue.

When leaving Germany where she noted some discrimination against arriving Syrian refugees, she went to consult with our volunteer representative for Italy, Ambassador Antonino Landi in Palermo, Sicily to discuss the refugee crisis and to justify an aspect within the formation of our global citizenship project especially for refugees and their families.

Ambassador Cantrell reported that; "there was a great deal of debate and misgiving," she witnessed, "first hand a great deal of discrimination, but also a great deal of pro-refugee awareness and activism." She said in closing, "Germany is run by people with great minds and they have accepted this enormous social responsibility when others have turned their heads. Chancellor Merkel has stood fast on this issue and has the support of the majority of the German people. Those who fear a takeover have to live with their narrow mindedness and discriminatory nationalist ideals." She also cited the example of the Turkish wave of immigration years ago which has turned out historically to be very beneficial to the country's economy and the betterment of the society in general.

Including Everyone in the Global Agenda

After careful review of international law all the recent immigrants to Europe each and all possess particular human rights as refugees under the United Nations and may potentially become new global citizens under the Globcal International program based on the updated development of our project as soon as this January.