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Showing posts with label UNESCO. Show all posts
Showing posts with label UNESCO. Show all posts

Friday, October 16, 2015

Wealthy Investors may pay a Global Citizen Tax

Conclusions of the 3rd Global Citizen Forum - October 14th, 2015, Monaco

Kofi Annan addressed the refugee
crisis in Europe and its root causes.
Global Citizen Forum concludes in Monaco with a call for greater cooperation between governments, private sector and individuals to address global migration challenges.

Story: Global Citizen Tax

The 3rd annual Global Citizen Forum concluded in Monaco on October 9, 2015. Global Citizens, world leaders, policymakers, philanthropists, celebrities and thought leaders gathered to discuss an array of issues currently facing the world, focusing on the escalating refugee crisis in Europe and the need for a political solution.

In his keynote address, Kofi Annan, the 7th Secretary General of the United Nations and Founder and Chair of the Kofi Annan Foundation, said that Europe is facing the greatest movement of refugees since World War II. “The historic refugee crisis Europe is facing today is so hard to solve because it is not a one-off, humanitarian phenomenon. It is, in fact, a by-product and symptom of much deeper political problems that beset regional and global order. It will therefore require concerted action not just in and by Europe, but among the regional powers of the Middle East, and the global powers of the Security Council.”

Irina Bokova, Director General of UNESCO, addressed the forum with the message that global citizenship lies in the future leaders of the world, the youth, and the great need to address issues such as access to education and teaching tolerance and peace among the world’s children. “To move forward, we need every actor on board, from civil society to the private sector, to connect the dots, to foster the innovation the world needs today. Each of us has a responsibility to others; each of us has a responsibility to the world. This is about human rights and dignity. This is about inclusion and peace. Fundamentally, this is about the kind of societies we want to live in.”

Refugee Solutions

During his address, José Manuel Barroso, former Prime Minister of Portugal and 11th President of the European Commission, looked at the meaning of borders and the role of global governance today. “We have learned that today we are more interdependent than ever. We can be proud of our local, national and regional identity, but also realizing that we are part of mankind. This refugee crisis is a time to show that we are serious about our values, that we can make them work in favor of common interest of mankind. The idea of this global citizen tax is one way. It shows that countries are not just interested in receiving the wealthy, but also sharing that wealth with those most in need.”

One proposed solution that was discussed was the idea for a Global Citizen Tax, endorsed by José Manuel Barroso. The tax would be a simple levy on investor applications for residence or citizenship in EU countries. The proposed tax could mean big changes, potentially delivering revenues of over a billion euros in the next five years. These impact of these funds could be realized through the creation of jobs, aid for the agencies working with refugees or other economic stimulation to the impacted countries.

Three-time Grammy award-winning artist and activist Wyclef Jean delivered a moving speech about his experience as a refugee and becoming a global citizen. Various panel discussions were held including a panel on peace and security that explored current geopolitical challenges and trends in the Middle East, Africa and other regions, and discussion on innovative approaches to addressing the refugee crisis and foreign direct investment’s impact in countries around the world. Leadership expert Robin Sharma spoke of the importance of individual leadership and becoming a “change-maker” in the global citizenship community during his session at the forum.

Global Citizenship Gala

The forum hosted the Global Citizen Gala on the evening of October 8th. Each year the GCF bestows Global Citizen Award at the Gala dinner and this year’s award was presented to Regina Catrambone, co-founder of the Migrant Offshore Aid Station (MOAS) for the contribution the company founded by herself and her husband has made to bring awareness and aid to refugees. The Gala also featured a special performance by forum speaker, activist and performer, Wyclef Jean.

This year’s event aimed to inspire change, provoke innovation, encourage engagement and empower future generations. Attendees and speakers alike were challenged to think differently about global challenges and new ways to address them. Armand Arton, founder of the Global Citizen Forum, said: “This Forum was founded to focus on global challenges and opportunities related to migration and the concept of global citizenship from the perspective of individuals and governments. The past two days have seen energetic and thought-provoking discussion on a full spectrum of issues relating to global citizenship that have gone a long a way to building and deepening the global community that we aspire to create.”

Please find a short video here about this year’s event: https://youtu.be/mmklSRQ9mjc

Thursday, September 24, 2015

Global Leaders Discuss Global Citizenship for Refugees

Kofi Annan, Global Leaders will Discuss Future of Global Citizenship and Solutions to Migrant Crisis at Global Citizen Forum 2015

MONACO (PRWEB) SEPTEMBER 13, 2015

Global Citizens, world leaders, policymakers, philanthropists, celebrities and thought leaders will gather next month in the Principality of Monaco for the 3rd annual Global Citizen Forum (GCF) held from 8-9 October 2015. This year, the GCF, a non-profit platform, will call attention to the intensifying refugee crisis in Europe and the urgent need to enact effective solutions. Additionally the Forum will feature discussions on global security, foreign direct investment and the future of global citizenship.




“During a time of tremendous global challenges including the refugee and migration crisis along with continued global economic volatility, the Forum aims to gather not only thinkers but those willing to take action to drive change on these important issues collaboratively,” says Armand Arton, the Forum’s Founder. “Our aim is to work together with governments, policymakers, philanthropists and global citizens to present public-private solutions to some of today’s most pressing challenges – and then to work together to bring those solutions to life,” says Arton.

For the first time, the Forum will consider the impact of current mass migration trends and what those trends mean in the face of today’s political and economic uncertainty. "In the face of the escalating refugee crisis, we must respond together as global citizens, with the firm resolve to do what is right, to do what is fair, and to treat fellow human beings with the dignity they deserve. This is what the GCF is about, and I'm looking forward to being part of this year's discussions," shares Irina Bokova, Director-General of Unesco and a speaker at the Forum.

“Every day we are reading the headlines on the growing global refugee and migration crisis – a challenge bridging both the Middle East and Europe,” says Jacques Attali, French economist, writer and former advisor to the President of France and a speaker at this year’s Forum.

One potential solution to this challenge is the Global Citizen Tax which will be further discussed at the forum. The tax would be a simple levy on investor applications for residence or citizenship in EU countries. The proposed tax could mean big changes, potentially funding over a billion euros in the next five years. These funds demonstrate the positive impact global citizenship can have, whether it’s through the creation of jobs, aid for the agencies working with refugees or other economic stimulation to the impacted countries.

“We know that wealthy global migrants now act as drivers of economic growth, contributing around 50 billion euros of foreign direct investment to countries around the world, and by using some of the citizen investment funds to help solve the growing crisis, we can effect positive change that makes a tangible difference,” according to Arton.

The Forum will also empower discussions on what it means to be a global citizen and the opportunities for economic growth and mobility that globalization presents. “This year’s Forum will be a place for an open and honest dialogue on the changing global landscape, and our responsibility as global citizens to implement the ideas we discuss –together,” says Arton. He will be joined by some of the world’s thought leaders, government officials, policy makers and philanthropists who will gather to discuss these pressing issues and to innovative solutions to meet the changing global landscape.
Kofi Annan (Facebook Photo)

In addition to Kofi Annan, former Secretary-General of the United Nations, this year’s speakers include Jose Manuel Barroso, former President of the European Commission and former Prime Minister of Portugal; Irina Bokova, Director-General of UNESCO and a number of other activists and public figures.

On October 8, 2015, the Forum will host the Global Citizen Gala. During the Gala, the 2015 Global Citizen Forum Award will be presented. The award honours individuals who have contributed to the development of global citizenship through their work within the global community. The gala also features a special performance by artist and activist, Wyclef Jean, who will also be speaking at the forum.

Commentary by Ambassador Col. David Wright of Globcal International: Global citizenship is a new and relevant movement involving personal freedom, good character, and eco-social responsibility with the planet, it involves human rights, our futures, and involves personal sovereignty. We urge our readers and supporters of the global citizenship movement to be wary and cautious relative to their understanding of governmental authorities, organizations that are sponsored by corporations, events that are sponsored by NGOs, and political populist operations that promise social change that exist under the jurisdiction of nation-states. The only true global citizenship agenda will be one that is formed as a cooperative where each member is equal and there are no inhuman corporate bodies. 

Wednesday, January 14, 2015

Introducing CiNGO Cooperative Development through Globcal International

The Development of the Cooperative International Non-Governmental Organization (CiNGO)

Imagine a world that is cooperative, tax-exempt, self-governing, ecologically sustainable, with abundant resources and plenty of jobs. Perhaps its not possible everywhere or just too complicated, but it is possible in the most critically endangered areas and ecosystems in absence of government integrity and presence of poverty. The United Nations has been working toward similar goals in recent years, now today they are in control territorially of hundreds of world heritage landmarks through UNESCO demonstrating sustainable models and ideals.
Twin Pines. Symbol of Cooperative Societies

Through cooperatives the people of a particular region, town, city, village or territory can do the same thing as the United Nations by transforming their societies into ecologically sustainable human settlements under the protection of Agenda 21.

Most countries in the world and most states in the United States have an act or statute that provides for the development of locally owned cooperative enterprises. Cooperative law from country to country varies greatly relative to governmental involvement, empowerment, and protection, but in essence are the same in function, are mostly nonprofit, nontaxable, and are all owned, operated, and benefitted from by their own members.

People benefit by being members of cooperatives through the new markets they create, dividend sharing income, and if they work for the cooperative a regular paycheck. In most countries cooperatives pay tax to do business with the public, but in the case of large cooperatives that are self-sustaining and multi-stakeholder in nature there is mostly complete tax exemption when doing business with fellow members.

In some countries cooperatives must be incorporated in others they are registered or chartered when they are constituted under guidelines established by the International Co-operative Alliance (ICA) in Geneva. Additionally best practice cooperative development guidelines are assimilated and strengthened through several departments of the United Nations which are committed to promote the benefits of cooperatives over corporations.

All cooperatives once registered or incorporated enjoy the same general privileges as private companies, large corporations, churches, non profit organizations, and are they are empowered to trade internationally under admiralty and maritime law from their seaports and airports. Normally this type of trade is regulated by nation's customs laws with taxes or duties; however there are very great exceptions for cooperative trade because of the cooperative member beneficiaries impunity to government regulation working within the nationally owned cooperative as someone exempt of customs as a national member.

Cooperatives are always managed and regulated by the members through their bylaws and usually made up of people from within the communities or regions which they are founded. Some countries will only permit their own regulated national citizens to be the founding members.

In 1994 I founded Ecology Crossroads Cooperative Foundation in Lexington, Kentucky as an organization empowered to develop/operate cooperatives and promote charitable works involving communities and ecology. We distributed 10,000,000 trees for planting to our members and supporters during our first years. We were successful in the reforestation and beautification of over 50 US cities through community participation and cooperative spirit.

Today we are working through Globcal International (a cooperative development established in 2009) to bring eco-socioeconomic collectives and model cooperatives that are self-governing, sustainable, nonpartisan, and nonreligious to communities around the world through "international cooperation."

The ideal we have been working with and researching is the development of an international non-governmental corporation that is independent from the state and capable of partnering internationally as if it were a sovereign entity. Now through Globcal we are managing this through the development of a model "Cooperative International Non Governmental Organization" (CiNGO).

Poster with 10 reasons "Co-Ops Rock."
The CiNGO we are overseeing is being developed to result in a transparent formation of integral self-governing self-sufficient communities, ecological villages, and sustainable human settlements under international treaties and conventions with the United Nations, international non governmental organizations, governments and intergovernmental organizations.

Currently we are primarily working with rural projects and peoples with the potential to become self-reliant working to provide ecosystem services, cultural tourism, and sustainable agroforestry production; however the model is adaptable for fishing villages, islands, indigenous reservations, cultural regions, isolated towns and even small countries with the right participation and cooperation principles in place. Successful semi autonomous thriving populations exist and thrive using these cooperative community oriented ideals within nations, a good example are the Mennonites of Belize, Canada and Mexico, there are quite a few others too if you look for them.

People generally associate with organizations and associations because they provide them with social groups that share their interests or fulfill their needs in other ways through their beneficial work. They support corporations for their jobs and to fulfill their basic needs in a mass society without limit. With the cooperative its deeper than that because the cooperative participant is a vested shareholder, investor, employee, participant, and protagonist fulfilling his or her own needs.

In January 2015 Globcal is making the CiNGO transformation practical with the incorporation of two, perhaps three model international cooperatives. The organizations will be multipurpose, multi-stakeholder, have charitable community integrity, be nongovernmental, nonpartisan, nonreligious, nonmilitary, nonprofit and nondiscriminatory in nature. The beneficiaries will be the cooperative members, employees, associates, volunteers, and the communities that support them.

One is located in Venezuela and the second is in Belize, these two nations were selected because they have special favorable diplomatic commercial and political relationships that are interdependent and involve commerce as well as barter, trading sugar for oil. The other nation that is drawn into the fold is the United States through the development of an international travel cooperative in Puerto Rico in the short term, once we find an appropriate endowment or establish a charitable foundation there.

Similar multistakeholder developments exist in England, Sweden, China, the Philippines, and even Russia now, but few are developed to the extent that they empower themselves to operate banks and become capacitated self-governing autonomous entities within states.

Currently we want begin a project to teach others online through open-sourcing and sharing our actual experience with our projects in formation through the social media. We are authoring a manual now and preparing a video for release in the immediate future to demonstrate step-by-step the process for creating your own independent society and autonomy through the development of an international cooperative to satisfy the real need to take control of our destinies.

It's my personal hope that groups of people who suffer under oppression or who are threatened by cultural assimilation can use our CiNGO model system under their own governments laws to gain personal autonomy, empower themselves, and gain equality through new treaties or agreements with government and through other treaties and conventions already established as members of the United Nations. The only requirement is a sustainable commitment and the desire to remain culturally independent and in this case cooperative with your international neighbors.

Globcal has taken this to the next level under Ecology Crossroads by developing an international cooperative system that is full circle in small autonomous communities capable of self-sufficiency and becoming ecologically sustainable.  Please join us as an ambassador of Globcal International or as a patron of our cooperative foundations in Belize and Venezuela.

We have many new opportunities for those who are highly motivated to succeed, committed to their communities, and dedicated to living sustainably with the environment.