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Showing posts with label peace. Show all posts
Showing posts with label peace. Show all posts

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Tibet, the Water Tower of Asia

Tibet, the Water Tower of Asia

Lobsang Sangay, president of the Central Tibetan Administration, is increasing the efforts to raise awareness about the deteriorating human rights situation in Tibet. Recently he visited Scandinavia and Canada and last week he visited the United States to discuss the Tibet issue and the U.S.-China bilateral relationship.

Globcal International's Goodwill Ambassador Maria Veneke Ylikomi had the great honour to interview Lobsang Sangay, or "Sikyong" as his Tibetan title is, during the president's visit in Sweden. The interview was made for the Swedish magazine Gränslöst, with the theme of human rights, democracy and tolerance. News about justice – for all.




"What we say is that we want to walk with the Chinese government, we want to talk with the Chinese government and we want a mutually acceptable solution with the Chinese government. It is to seek genuine autonomy as per Chinese laws for the Tibetan people", said Lobsang Sangay.

Sikyong studied International Law at Harvard Law School in the United States. In 2011, he got elected as president of the Tibetan-government-in-exile, Central Tibetan Administration, based in Dharamsala, India.

"I spent 16 years in America and learned quite a bit. And 2011 I ran for the election. I didn’t think I would win, my mother didn’t think I would win, no one thought I would win, but I won. And then I decided to move to India, to leave Harvard and leave my job in America. I didn’t find it that difficult, mental adjustment."

Below is the article which was published in the Swedish magazine Gränslöst:

Tibet’s president in exile – visiting Sweden

Tibet’s President in exile, Dr Lobsang Sangay, or “Sikyong” as his Tibetan title is, visited Sweden on November 14–15. The Swedish visit was arranged by the Swedish Tibet Committee together with the Tibetan Community in Sweden. The President had a hectic program during the two days in Sweden. The magazine Gränslöst received an exclusive interview with the Tibetan leader.

Gränslöst Magazine: Interview with the President of Tibet

by Maria Veneke Ylikomi, for the Swedish magazine Gränslöst, 2017-11-22

It is a sunny morning in November when Gränslöst meets Lobsang Sangay at a hotel in Stockholm. He talks about the challenges that the Tibetan people are facing. He says that human rights violations are the most pressing issues today.

– There is political repression, cultural assimilation, environmental destruction, social discrimination and economic marginalization.

As an example of cultural assimilation, Sikyong mentions the Tibetan language.

– The Chinese law says that Tibetan language should be not only used but should be encouraged. But in practice, it is discouraged and not used.

Lobsang Sangay says that 150 Tibetans have burned themselves to death.

– Few young students burned themselves saying we want to use Tibetan language in Tibetan schools. That is severe.

Lobsang Sangay explains that Tibet totally lacks independent media.

– Reporters without Borders have said that it’s more difficult to have access to Tibet for journalists than North Korea. So, if you try to get a visa as a journalist to go to Tibet, Chinese Embassy will say no, you cannot go.

Lobsang Sangay thinks that the water issue is very important not only for Tibet but for the whole Asia.

– Tibet is called the water tower of Asia. The ten major rivers of Asia flow from the Tibetan Plateau.

As examples of rivers flowing from Tibet, Sikyong mentions the rivers Indus, Brahmaputra, Mekong, Irrawaddy, Yangtze and Yellow River.

– Yellow River is the cradle of Chinese civilization. 1.4 billion people depend on freshwater flowing from Tibet. So it’s very serious. China has 19 per cent of the world population but only 12 per cent of freshwater, which means already 400 million Chinese are facing scarcity of water. The situation in other parts of Asia is bad.

Sikyong explains that China wants to divert the Tibetan rivers to the inner parts of China.

– There was one report that they want to divert Brahmaputra River, which is a lifeline for northeast of India and Bangladesh. They want to divert to Xinjiang, which is a very dry area. If that river is diverted, millions of people in northeast of India and Bangladesh will suffer.

The Tibetan Plateau is sometimes called “The Third Pole”.

– After Antarctic and Arctic, Tibet has the third highest reserve of ice. And Tibet also acts like the cooler or the refrigerator of the world. It is so high and so cold, covered in snow. Tibet has 46 000 glaciers. Nasa says, by 2100, one third will disappear, or even as high as two thirds will disappear. If two thirds of Tibetan glaciers disappear, what will happen to 1.4 billion people who are depending on water from the Tibetan Plateau? It is a very serious issue. One scientist in University of California said “if you want to understand climate change and global warming, it won’t be complete without understanding the Tibetan Plateau”.

Sikyong says that Chinese environmentalists are proposing to declare Tibet as the Third Pole National Park.

– Chinese government is not listening, so all the big companies are exploiting mineral resources of Tibet. And they are also exploiting all other kinds of minerals, cutting down trees and building a lot of hydro projects in Tibet regions and rivers. It is Chinese companies and Chinese leaders and officials who are profiting from all this kind of businesses.

Lobsang Sangay explains that deforestation causes natural disasters and floods.

– The Tibetan Plateau affects the climate all the way to Europe, whether the Sweden winter is cold or warm, whether there is heat wave in Europe or not, is partly determined by the climate change on the Tibetan Plateau. So the Tibet issue is a global environmental issue.

For the Tibetan leader Lobsang Sangay, Gandhi’s non-violent philosophy, ahimsa, is the right way to go.

– There is so much violence already in the world. If you can solve the issue, any issue, based on ahimsa and non-violence, it is always good. We are advocating this. There are people who are interested, there are people who are supportive, but unfortunately the Chinese government and Chinese leaders are not listening, so that’s where the challenge is.

Photo: Office of Tibet

Sikyong explains that Tibetan Buddhists are not given the right to peaceful demonstrations.

– Larung Gar monastery had 12 000 monks and nuns. From last year August to this year August, it was destroyed and reduced to 5 000 monks and nuns. 7 000 were expelled. Three nuns committed suicide. So you can clearly see, peaceful demonstration by Buddhist monks and nuns is impossible. Larung Gar and the surrounding mountains are surrounded by troops.

Sikyong believes that rise of nationalism is a global challenge.

– There is decrease in internationalism and there is rise of nationalism. In North America, Europe, Asia, it is a reality. And the Chinese nationalism is a new thing. So how we handle that is a big test. That’s the big challenge for the globe, for the whole world. We must continue the path of internationalism and liberalism. The world is getting smaller in the sense we all are integrated, the borders become porous, are intermingling. The liberal pulse is the best way to go. The rise of nationalism and extremism is creating more obstacles for general peace and harmony in the world.

Lobsang Sangay’s parents fled to India from Tibet in 1959.

– I grew up in a small village, in a place called Darjeeling. Darjeeling is known for tea. But I was not from the town. I was from the village. My family did not have much, only one acre of land, two–three cows, one dozen chicken. On my winter vacation I cut grass for cows, cut wood for home. I went to a refugee school, studied hard and worked hard.

Later in life, Lobsang Sangay received a Fulbright Scholarship to study International Law at Harvard Law School in the United States, where he got a doctorate degree. In 2011, he got elected as President of the Tibetan-government-in-exile, based in Dharamsala, India. He left America, Harvard, and went to Dharamsala to work for the Central Tibetan Administration.

– Since childhood, when you hear the stories from your parents, how much they suffered, how difficult it was, that inculcate some sense of responsibility in you.

Sikyong explains that His Holiness the Dalai Lama is a good helping hand.

– He thinks I am doing okay, helping the Tibetan cause. I meet him regularly. Just one week before I travelled to this part of the world, I met him twice in one week. I inform him and he advise me, so I get to meet regularly. He is a good support for me in everything I do.

In conclusion, Sikyong says he likes nature.

– I like forests, I like mountains, I like fresh air. And I like cows.

Gränslöst (borderless/limitless in the Swedish language) is a Swedish magazine with the theme of human rights, democracy and tolerance. News about justice – for all.

Sunday, July 31, 2016

Amish Bishop asks Native Americans for Reconciliation

Reconciliation among Peaceful Nations

Amish ask for forgiveness from Native Americans

An Amish bishop recently met with representatives of a twelve American Indian tribes (13 parties). He and other Amish apologized for the way their ancestors treated Native Americans and their land in early America. In an emotional session, both groups shed tears.

Native American Longhouse located in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
“Please forgive us for the wrong we did,” the bishop asked Native Americans gathered at a meeting place in Witmer, Pennsylvania. “We ask forgiveness, and we’ll forgive you, and God bless your land and your people.

One of the Amish men there said, “If this would have been done years ago, how much more healing would have been brought. But here we are. There’s no time too late.”

The Amish apology follows a series of reconciliation meetings in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania between various Christian groups and American Indians. A group of Lancaster Mennonites began the process more than a decade ago.

Melvin Lapp, of New Holland, Pennsylvania organized the event. MaryAnn Robins, president of Circle Legacy, a Native American advocacy group in Lancaster, helped with planning. Lapp was raised in an Amish family. Robins is a member of the Onondaga tribe.

As pacifists, the Amish did not fight American Indians, but they did take their land for their farms. They asked forgiveness for that passivity in the face of Native American deprivation.

“The Lord told me to honor the Native Americans because they’re the gatekeepers of the land,” Lapp said following the ceremony in Witmer. Lapp and Ron Burhoff, an Ohioan (from Ohio) who works with American Indians throughout the country, helped to facilitate the meeting of the two groups.
Creating Unity

“There are a lot of similarities between the cultures,” Lapp said. “Living on the land, caring for the land.”

“Respect of elders, caring for children,” added Robins. “Like the Amish,” she said, “we cling to our own people.”

Robins said American Indians plan to hold another meeting with the Amish this autumn to acknowledge their apology and to bless and honor them.

Shelia Hansen, a Shawnee from Virginia, formally accepted the Amish bishop’s apology during the ceremony.

Native American Meeting House (Longhouse) Photo: Facebook

“You raised the bar for this country, for all humanity, for forgiveness,” she told the Amish. She referred to those Amish who immediately forgave the shooter and supported his family following the massacre at Nickel Mines Amish school in Bart Township nearly a decade ago.


“As we came in here, the wind blew really hard, and it came through the trees,” Hansen said. “And I believe that the spirits of our old ones came by the wind, and they spoke, and this is a good day.”

The American Indians and the Amish exchanged gifts at the reunion.

In addition to the Amish reconciliation effort, some Native Americans apologized to other tribes for mistreating them. This effort was as significant to meeting participants as the Amish apology.

Anne Richardson, chief of the Rappahannock Tribe in Virginia, told Barbara Andrews Christy, a Seneca Indian who lives in Lancaster, that she forgives the Seneca for coming to Virginia and seizing a Rappahannock fort. She called for reconciliation between the tribes.

In turn, Christy asked for forgiveness for fighting over land.

Richardson also asked Tina Marks, a representative of Lancaster County’s Conoy tribe, to forgive her people for fighting.

Several Native Americans expressed concern that the U.S. government has never apologized for seizing American Indian land. But Richardson said, “We are prisoners of hope. We never give up. Atrocity after atrocity, we’re still here. This is the hour of restoration of our people.”

Mennonites held the first reconciliation meeting with American Indians here in 2003. In 2010, regional Presbyterians, Mennonites and Quakers apologized for the 1763 massacre of Conestoga Indians. And last month, Eastern Pennsylvania Conference Methodists acknowledged their church’s role in oppressing American Indians during a repentance ceremony held in Lancaster.

Authored by Jack Brubaker, Jack writes "The Scribbler'' a local column for Lancaster Online in Southeastern Pennsylvania, USA. Any editions made are developed for international perspective and to provide supplemental links to our members. See the original article here.
The Amish and the twelve Native American tribes will be surprised to learn that they are being recognized for a peace and reconciliation award from Globcal International and the International Indigenous Unity Flag from our new offices in Vienna, Austria this fall as a result of the following action described in this article. The Amish may be humble, but we learned they will be glad to be acknowledged together with the Native Americans in their great effort as God's people and people of peace in this jubilation year to make an example for others to do the same. The award will be delivered this year on Indigenous People's Day formerly known as Columbus Day during the revolutionary and industrial age. We should all hold great respect for all the parties involved they are today's ambassadors of peace and goodwill.

Friday, December 18, 2015

Meet the Women in Charge of Change

When we are talking about votes the following female leaders of Globcal International often have the final word or the morale of the organization could become unbalanced as a civil society; so when we develop programs we need to ensure their best interests are at heart ethically, morally and aesthetically. This is one aspect of our organization that makes it more attractive to a cooperative audience, the ladies!

Role Models for Change

Ambassadors Deborah Levine, Dame Karen Cantrell, Maria Veneke Ylikomi, Dr. Sonia Ceballos and Ricki Landers all serve the organization as founders and commissioners and have all been involved since 2009. While we were full of growing pains, the Most Venerable Meena Persad joined us to help develop an embassy in Guyana and create funding sources for an orphanage she is developing there. Then just last month the Honorable Ricki Landers of Tennessee joined us to offer technical and expert support involving the social media.

Deborah Levine

Deborah Levine is a cross-cultural communication expert, an award-winning author and a writing coach, passionate about cultural diversity in this world. Her great interest for cultural diversity work started to grow already in childhood as she grew up in one of few Jewish families in British Bermuda.

Deborah is an entrepreneur and innovator of multiple projects that share and teach cultural diversity. The American Diversity Report (americandiversityreport.com) received the 2013 Champion of Diversity Award from diversitybusiness.com. The Women’s Council on Diversity (womengroundbreakers.com) received the Excellence Award from the Tennessee Economic Council on Women.With degrees in cultural anthropology and urban planning, Deborah is a cross-cultural trainer whose clients include government, corporations, education organizations, and healthcare institutions. Her creative cross-cultural teaching strategies are outlined in her textbook, "Matrix Model Management System: Guide to Cross-Cultural Wisdom".


Karen Cantrell

Karen Cantrell is a successful entrepreneur and founder of Lady Golf. When it comes to empowering women in different parts of the world, Karen is very enthusiastic. She is among a great deal of other things involved in empowering women in for example India, Brazil, Africa, UK, European Union and Venezuela. Karen Cantrell is the International Vice President of several different organizations that are making great efforts for the empowering of women.

Karen Cantrell's educational background is of such, a Doctor of Humane Letters from Becket Theological Institute in Canterbury, England, for her great service to create peace, harmony, fraternity, understanding and tolerance. She is truly committed to seeing that those in need receive the best possible help available. Karen has voluntarily offered her services to humankind her entire life. Her actions speak for themselves. Karen's dedication, compassion, and generosity have made an incredible and positive difference in the lives of both people and animals.


Maria Veneke Ylikomi


Maria Veneke Ylikomi works as a language consultant. She enjoys writing and has among other things written a book about the four felines jaguar, tiger, lion and leopard in cooperation with the wildlife photographer Jan Fleischmann. Maria has studied at Lund University in Sweden, mainly within humanities and languages. Maria is administrator of International Observances and registrar for the Global Citizenship Registry. In 2014 Maria was commissioned a Kentucky Colonel.

Maria's great interest in traveling and curiosity about other cultures has brought her to more than 30 different countries (in Asia, Africa, North America and Europe). Her time spent as a volunteer at an orphanage in war-torn Cambodia is one of the circumstances that has led Maria to dedicate a part of her time to the non-profit organization Globcal International. As a Goodwill Ambassador, Maria is able to collaborate with other professional colleagues to promote humanitarian issues, environmental issues, human rights and peace.


Sonia Ceballos

Sonia Ceballos was born in Caracas, Venezuela and came by destiny into traveling and dealing with people around the world, She has studied psychology at the Central University of Venezuela and is always concerned about social issues, She first became involved in social work with youth at risk in the Caracas slums, and then she started to help minorities, such as indigenous peoples of Venezuela, with ecological and social protection and education. She is a great and warmhearted defender of human rights.

Dr. Sonia Ceballos currently works as the manager of Fundo Ekobius, which is a real functional and self-sustainable cooperative. It is an organization that has a clear focus on naturalism, ecology, indigenous knowledge and environmental enhancement. Sonia is collaborating in the area of psychology in various philanthropic projects through Globcal International. She is interested in personal development. Without political bias Sonia is a loyal fan of the trade union, and opportunities for all.


Meena Persad

Meena Persad is an Ambassador for Globcal International and Goodwill Ambassadors of the World representative for Guyana in New York City. She is a mother of four children, and have two degrees: a Bachelor of Arts in Business, and a Masters Degree in Human Resource Management and Finance.

Meena Persad has always had a passion for writing and has written the book ”Classic Bible Stories for Children”. She hopes that the book can help children to live with a sense of morality, and that it will touch their hearts so they can live with dignity. "If children live with honesty, love, and respect for themselves and others, it will make a big difference in our society today", says Meena. She is passionate about helping children in need especially in Guyana, where she has an orphanage. She loves to help the children to reach their highest potential. Meena would be delighted to be able to donate books to children in orphanages around the world, so that children can have a chance to educate themselves.



Ricki Landers

Ricki Landers joined Globcal International last month. She is a web designer, graphic designer, and Search Engine Optimization expert. She is a mother of three children and a wife of 26 years. Ricki has a vast educational background; she has a Master of Fine Arts and a Bachelor of Science and an Associate of Science in Digital Design and Web Development.

Ricki Landers has owned several successful businesses and she has been a public speaker, and a professional radio and TV broadcaster. She is an author and a travel writer with a focus on sustainable tourism. She does most of her work in marketing and online marketing is her great specialty. She is a dedicated human rights advocate and has led many international campaigns using social media. Ricki freelances for companies who are seeking to increase their revenue and brand awareness. She is now working on several projects that will work to bring sustainable and environmentally friendly food and housing to areas that are in desperate need of both.

Other Members

We also have several women who work with us as volunteer ambassadors who have helped periodically to promote events with us online: Astrid, Irmgard, Lakshmi, Hira, Sahro, Maya-Lis, and Nikija, We will present them all soon in an upcoming article in January about our volunteerism program.

Thursday, June 18, 2009

World Leaders Coalition to be Launched on Facebook by Globcal


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

International Online Newsfeeds, Thursday, June 18, 2009 -- The World Leaders Coalition is scheduled to initiate its activities on Facebook through Globcal and its groups; the "Facebook People's Embassy" and "Facebook Diplomatic Corps" this Fall. The coalition group consists 32 world leaders and up to 450 other global role models that include movers and shakers like; Nobel prize winners, former presidents, current heads of state, and many well known celebrities currently serving as goodwill ambassadors for the United Nations, the European Union, and other noteworthy organizations and efforts.

The world leaders featured in the program include US President Barack Obama, Brazilian President Lula Da Silva, French President Nicolas Sarkozy, Argentina President Christina Fernandez de Kirchner, and other European, African, Latin American, Caribbean, and Asian Leaders, including the Presidents of China and India. There are also religious and political leaders involved based on the non-conflict peace based coalition message campaign they will support together. Some of the goodwill ambassadors include Oprah Winfrey, Angelina Jolie, Elton John, Sting, and many more.

These leaders and motivated personalities are united through their base public alignment, common beliefs, causes, and similar idealism on certain matters including human rights, organized labor, peace, anti-corruption, cooperation, fair-trade and more. The program is an interactive cross-platform communications sub-network that allows transparency between the extremes using agents (ambassadors) as intermediaries.

It is from the Facebook People's Embassy that anyone on Facebook can communicate with ambassadors from its diplomatic corps whom will be representing the World Leaders Coalition.

The Facebook People's Embassy program ambassadors are assigned for each geopolitical and cultural niche to include most social circles, groups of people, and geo-regions, these Ambassadors are given the privilege to directly post a weekly dispatch and communicate directly with these all of the world leaders collectively. Ambassadors post their weekly dispatch based on their communications in the Embassy and from the special Ambassador pages assigned and authorized by Globcal on local and global matters presented by their constituencies. Dispatches are presented under strict protocols and ambassadors are trained to be familiar with presentation rules and writing style.

The Facebook People's Embassy and the World Leader's Coalition will become fully operational on Facebook beginning in September or October. Their programs and development will be done through the Globcal Cooperative which is developing the contacts and interface for the cross-platform application that permits this facilitated communication that results in "power to the people."

Globcal is working with the Facebook People's Embassy to find, qualify, and train many more ambassadors from many countries, groups, and organizations to feed the World Leader's Coalition communications Dispatch. Since much of the development work is done on a spare time and volunteer basis much additional assistance is also still needed to accrue content for the base website as well.

To follow the news and stay informed join the Embassy and become a Fan of the Globcal page on Facebook. Outside of Facebook you can keep up with new developments by bookmarking Globcal.Org or subscribing to the Globcal blog at Blogger.

For more information contact: Col. David Jeffrey Wright, Founder and Project Developer, Facebook People's Embassy (formerly MUNSNE) in Caracas, Monday through Friday at +58(212)516.03.61 or write to embassy@globcal.org

-30-

The final list of participant leaders will be amended to this article no later that June 19, 2009.