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Showing posts with label empowerment of women. Show all posts
Showing posts with label empowerment of women. Show all posts

Friday, August 26, 2016

Human Empowerment through Cooperation

Making the Cooperative the Ideal Business Model

The ideal of the 'cooperative' was first developed in the 1820s, long before privately held corporations by individuals, based on the development of the free and fair exchange of legally held assets through common ownership of a business or distribution system designed to benefit its members who collectively own the institution as a society. The non-profit and for profit co-operative embodiment today has become a solid institutional part of the corporate laws of many countries while in other countries that depend on the concept of international cooperation from other nations have yet to allow the concept of an employee owned business or corporation to emerge in their legal systems. Cooperatives are tax-free and generally protected by governments as social orders within the area of human and civil rights in addition to being legal businesses.

Cooperatives empower communities.
Cooperatives are and remain to be the safest, most sustainable and lowest-risk type of an investment an individual can make because the foundation of the cooperative involve intangible assets, membership involves special rights, privileges and benefits that are available through belonging. In a cooperative members in essence belong to one another equally and are responsible for perpetuating the cooperatorship. Globcal International has developed the first international cooperatorship that is truly non-governmental because it is formed as a non-state actor and bases its jurisdiction in the offshore international realm of the high-seas under admiralty, maritime and international law.

What you choose to follow or be a part of in life is generally based solely in your personal character and personality, but we do know that, once people begin to realize the potential of cooperatives and the benefits that are possible they will always cherish their cooperative memberships with our global development and by being a part of cooperatives locally in their own communities, cooperatives are security. Cooperatives are known for being socially responsible, fair, fraternal, equal and democratic. They are also designed to distribute benefits and profits equally to members. Commentary by David J. Wright

For information regarding the reformation of your business for the international sector or remove your state of incorporation or to offshore your personal character and intellectual property to a tax-free jurisdiction, then join us at Globcal International as a non-state citizen, then see the membership link on our blog.

Scaling Up Cooperatives to Reach the Sustainable Development Goals

Article: Huffington-Post

Cooperatives are Naturally the Best Way to promote the SDGs

Cooperatives empower women.
Long before Uber or Airbnb, cooperatives capitalized on a sharing economy, but with an explicit mission to share benefits with everyone in society, especially the poor and vulnerable. Cooperatives have a storied history and carry distinct advantages in addressing the needs of low-income people. They rely on sharing information and trust in communities around a common purpose.

Over the decades, cooperatives have had success in areas like savings, agriculture, housing, or distribution of electricity. While there have been many improvements, they have faced challenges in areas such as tax policy, discriminatory regulation, achieving scale, and prevailing business attitudes toward their mission and business model.

To achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) — a set of 17 global goals which seek to end poverty by 2030, promote peace, and preserve the planet for future generations — we need to take advantage of the power of cooperatives. The SDGs fit nicely under the umbrella of the World Bank Group’s twin goals of ending poverty by 2030 and promoting shared prosperity.

The work is daunting, particularly in the area of financial inclusion. In 2014, only 62 percent of the world’s adult population had a financial account - leaving 2 billion adults without one.

Cooperative Financial Institutions (or CFI’s) include savings and credit cooperatives, credit unions, financial cooperatives, as well as savings and loan associations. They are key strategic partners in achieving both the goals of universal financial access, ending extreme poverty. They have low operating costs and are located in remote, rural areas with no financial institutions.

Yet for many of these member-owned institutions, scaling up savings services is impaired by challenges related to management and staff capacity, governance, and oversight and supervision. Some financial cooperatives and credit unions cannot safely lend funds received as deposits due to lack of credit capacity and systems.

We can help financial cooperatives scale-up by supporting them with technical advice and new technology to help them share data and information with their clients and with development practitioners. They can also benefit from active global partnerships with multilateral institutions, non-governmental organizations, and the private sector.

CFIs are one of the main providers of financial services to low-income people, with 700 million members and accountholders worldwide. CFIs have large constituencies in India, China, Indonesia, Brazil, Mexico, Kenya, Morocco, and over 35 smaller developing countries such as Togo and Haiti.

Last year, the World Bank Group’s private sector arm, the IFC, had an estimated $500 million of investments in CFIs around the world. The World Bank Group has been active for decades in this area. Some of the most notable programs include the Indian Dairy Cooperative, which has created an estimated 250,000 jobs, mostly in rural areas. Similarly, Mexico’s National Savings and Financial Services Bank has helped strengthen savings and credit institutions that serve millions of rural residents, who would otherwise have been relegated to the margins of the formal financial sector.

The World Bank Group’s policy teams have helped governments supervise and regulate cooperative financial institutions. For example, in 2009, the Bank Group worked with Rwanda to strengthen both the supervision and reach of Savings and Credit Cooperatives. By mid-2012 financial access in Rwanda increased from 47 percent to 72 percent. The newly created savings and credit cooperatives played an important role in this increase since they operated in 215 rural locations in which no financial institution existed previously. And the partnership with Rwanda also significantly increased the financial sustainability of the savings and credit cooperatives.

In a more mobile and urban world, cooperatives must adapt, while maintaining their basic values and approach. As seen in Sub-Saharan Africa, mobile money accounts can drive financial inclusion. While just 1 percent of adults globally say they use a mobile money account and nothing else, in Sub-Saharan Africa, 12 percent of adults (64 million adults) have mobile money accounts (compared to just 2 percent worldwide); 45 percent of them have only a mobile money account. Mobile money accounts can help narrow the gap in financial inclusion between men and women, which could have important effects on inequality and child welfare. CFIs will have to stay abreast of these developments and exploit these new technologies to maximize financial inclusion, particularly for the poor.

Capitalizing on cooperatives’ successes and learning from their mistakes can help us expand the menu of options as we search for more inclusive and sustainable models of development, and new ways of building and sharing knowledge. In this way we can significantly contribute to our common goal of ending extreme poverty in a single generation.

Republished from the Huffington Post, Scaling Up Cooperatives to Reach the Sustainable Development Goals by Mahmoud Mohieldin Senior Vice President for the 2030 Development Agenda, UN Relations and Partnerships

Friday, December 18, 2015

Meet the Women in Charge of Change

When we are talking about votes the following female leaders of Globcal International often have the final word or the morale of the organization could become unbalanced as a civil society; so when we develop programs we need to ensure their best interests are at heart ethically, morally and aesthetically. This is one aspect of our organization that makes it more attractive to a cooperative audience, the ladies!

Role Models for Change

Ambassadors Deborah Levine, Dame Karen Cantrell, Maria Veneke Ylikomi, Dr. Sonia Ceballos and Ricki Landers all serve the organization as founders and commissioners and have all been involved since 2009. While we were full of growing pains, the Most Venerable Meena Persad joined us to help develop an embassy in Guyana and create funding sources for an orphanage she is developing there. Then just last month the Honorable Ricki Landers of Tennessee joined us to offer technical and expert support involving the social media.

Deborah Levine

Deborah Levine is a cross-cultural communication expert, an award-winning author and a writing coach, passionate about cultural diversity in this world. Her great interest for cultural diversity work started to grow already in childhood as she grew up in one of few Jewish families in British Bermuda.

Deborah is an entrepreneur and innovator of multiple projects that share and teach cultural diversity. The American Diversity Report (americandiversityreport.com) received the 2013 Champion of Diversity Award from diversitybusiness.com. The Women’s Council on Diversity (womengroundbreakers.com) received the Excellence Award from the Tennessee Economic Council on Women.With degrees in cultural anthropology and urban planning, Deborah is a cross-cultural trainer whose clients include government, corporations, education organizations, and healthcare institutions. Her creative cross-cultural teaching strategies are outlined in her textbook, "Matrix Model Management System: Guide to Cross-Cultural Wisdom".


Karen Cantrell

Karen Cantrell is a successful entrepreneur and founder of Lady Golf. When it comes to empowering women in different parts of the world, Karen is very enthusiastic. She is among a great deal of other things involved in empowering women in for example India, Brazil, Africa, UK, European Union and Venezuela. Karen Cantrell is the International Vice President of several different organizations that are making great efforts for the empowering of women.

Karen Cantrell's educational background is of such, a Doctor of Humane Letters from Becket Theological Institute in Canterbury, England, for her great service to create peace, harmony, fraternity, understanding and tolerance. She is truly committed to seeing that those in need receive the best possible help available. Karen has voluntarily offered her services to humankind her entire life. Her actions speak for themselves. Karen's dedication, compassion, and generosity have made an incredible and positive difference in the lives of both people and animals.


Maria Veneke Ylikomi


Maria Veneke Ylikomi works as a language consultant. She enjoys writing and has among other things written a book about the four felines jaguar, tiger, lion and leopard in cooperation with the wildlife photographer Jan Fleischmann. Maria has studied at Lund University in Sweden, mainly within humanities and languages. Maria is administrator of International Observances and registrar for the Global Citizenship Registry. In 2014 Maria was commissioned a Kentucky Colonel.

Maria's great interest in traveling and curiosity about other cultures has brought her to more than 30 different countries (in Asia, Africa, North America and Europe). Her time spent as a volunteer at an orphanage in war-torn Cambodia is one of the circumstances that has led Maria to dedicate a part of her time to the non-profit organization Globcal International. As a Goodwill Ambassador, Maria is able to collaborate with other professional colleagues to promote humanitarian issues, environmental issues, human rights and peace.


Sonia Ceballos

Sonia Ceballos was born in Caracas, Venezuela and came by destiny into traveling and dealing with people around the world, She has studied psychology at the Central University of Venezuela and is always concerned about social issues, She first became involved in social work with youth at risk in the Caracas slums, and then she started to help minorities, such as indigenous peoples of Venezuela, with ecological and social protection and education. She is a great and warmhearted defender of human rights.

Dr. Sonia Ceballos currently works as the manager of Fundo Ekobius, which is a real functional and self-sustainable cooperative. It is an organization that has a clear focus on naturalism, ecology, indigenous knowledge and environmental enhancement. Sonia is collaborating in the area of psychology in various philanthropic projects through Globcal International. She is interested in personal development. Without political bias Sonia is a loyal fan of the trade union, and opportunities for all.


Meena Persad

Meena Persad is an Ambassador for Globcal International and Goodwill Ambassadors of the World representative for Guyana in New York City. She is a mother of four children, and have two degrees: a Bachelor of Arts in Business, and a Masters Degree in Human Resource Management and Finance.

Meena Persad has always had a passion for writing and has written the book ”Classic Bible Stories for Children”. She hopes that the book can help children to live with a sense of morality, and that it will touch their hearts so they can live with dignity. "If children live with honesty, love, and respect for themselves and others, it will make a big difference in our society today", says Meena. She is passionate about helping children in need especially in Guyana, where she has an orphanage. She loves to help the children to reach their highest potential. Meena would be delighted to be able to donate books to children in orphanages around the world, so that children can have a chance to educate themselves.



Ricki Landers

Ricki Landers joined Globcal International last month. She is a web designer, graphic designer, and Search Engine Optimization expert. She is a mother of three children and a wife of 26 years. Ricki has a vast educational background; she has a Master of Fine Arts and a Bachelor of Science and an Associate of Science in Digital Design and Web Development.

Ricki Landers has owned several successful businesses and she has been a public speaker, and a professional radio and TV broadcaster. She is an author and a travel writer with a focus on sustainable tourism. She does most of her work in marketing and online marketing is her great specialty. She is a dedicated human rights advocate and has led many international campaigns using social media. Ricki freelances for companies who are seeking to increase their revenue and brand awareness. She is now working on several projects that will work to bring sustainable and environmentally friendly food and housing to areas that are in desperate need of both.

Other Members

We also have several women who work with us as volunteer ambassadors who have helped periodically to promote events with us online: Astrid, Irmgard, Lakshmi, Hira, Sahro, Maya-Lis, and Nikija, We will present them all soon in an upcoming article in January about our volunteerism program.