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Showing posts with label Sustainable Development Summit. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Sustainable Development Summit. Show all posts

Saturday, September 19, 2015

No One Left Behind, Arriving at the Crossroads

SDGs Are an Opportunity to Ensure That We Leave No One Behind

By Tom Caiazza, Center for American Progress

Washington, D.C. — Next week, at a U.N. Summit that is likely to be the largest gathering of global leaders ever convened, nations will adopt the Sustainable Development Goals, or SDGs, a set of global goals intended to end poverty, combat inequality, and tackle climate change and environmental degradation. Ahead of the summit, the Center for American Progress released an issue brief calling on global leaders to ensure that every person, including the poorest and most marginalized, is able to reap the benefits of global prosperity and freedom. The brief calls for leaders to enshrine this promise in a “leave no one behind” charter and to fulfill the promise through policy changes.

The past several decades have shown unprecedented levels of global growth with decreases in chronic poverty, child death rates, and HIV infections. Despite these improvements, too many are still left behind in cycles of poverty, disease, and injustice. The SDGs must give impetus to the concept that all people deserve a basic universal standard of well-being and acknowledge that no country has completely succeeded in achieving fair opportunity for every citizen.

“The SDGs represent one of the best opportunities we have to bring the international community together to end extreme poverty and combat structural inequalities,” said Molly Elgin-Cossart, CAP Senior Fellow and author of the brief. “But without political will and concrete action, the lofty rhetoric behind the SDGs risks being little more than words. Leaders must define what it means to leave no one behind and be held accountable for designing policies at home and abroad to fulfill this commitment.”

The concept of leave no one behind rests on a few basic principles, including that every single person on the plant deserves a fair shot at life; that the current way of doing business does not promote universal prosperity; and that progress is possible if we make progressive changes to the way countries grow and develop to ensure that the most vulnerable among us are included. While enshrining these principles into the SDGs will not solve all the world’s ills, it will amount to concrete action toward a better, safer, more just world. As global leaders meet to adopt these goals, it is critical to galvanize political will to see that no one is left behind.

Click here to read the brief “Leave No One Behind: Taking Action to Combat Global Poverty and Inequality” By Molly Elgin-Cossart

From the Globcal International editor: We began our development of Ecology Crossroads Cooperative Foundation and Globcal International based under the concepts of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the Rio Declaration on Sustainable Development and the Environment. Since the time we were founded to this time is exactly 21 years have passed, we have reached the crossroads, its time to follow an ecological path. Join us now at the crossroads. 

Thursday, September 17, 2015

Charter for the "People and the Planet" to be adopted by the UN

Historic moment when UN adopts ‘charter for people and planet’ 


The top United Nations official who oversaw the negotiations that whittled down more than 500 proposals into 17 goals to end extreme poverty, fight inequality and injustice and tackle climate change says it will be a “historic moment” when world leaders formally commit to the Sustainable Development Goals later this month.

“If you have the time, just follow closely the United Nations webcast on the forthcoming summit in September,” Wu Hongbo, Under-Secretary-General for Economic and Social Affairs, said in an interview with the UN News Centre. “We hope you will be an eyewitness to this historic moment.”

Mr. Wu was referring to the Sustainable Development Summit, to be held from 25 to 27 September at UN Headquarters in New York, at which world leaders will formally adopt the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which he described as “a charter for the people and planet in the 21st century.”
I am confident that these 17 goals and 169 associated targets will be implemented worldwide.
He said that, unlike the previous set of UN targets, the Millennium Development Goals, Member States have had “ownership” of the agenda from the start of the process three years ago.
“Now they have the ownership and I am confident that these 17 goals and 169 associated targets will be implemented worldwide,” he said.

Recalling the negotiations he navigated starting with a 30-member working group that evolved to include all 193 Member States, Mr. Wu said “at the beginning, they came up with more than 500 goals.”

Despite the many differences, he said the “driving force” behind the work over the past three years is the common belief that “our present way of consumption, our present way of production is not sustainable.”

The 17 proposed goals and 169 targets are aimed at stimulating action over the next 15 years in areas of critical importance towards building a more equitable and sustainable world for all.
Mr. Wu outlined some key challenges over the next 15 years ranging from the need to change work methods and mindsets to operate with partners and outside “silos;” the need to do more to follow up to ensure what has been promised is being implemented; and the need to help build capacities with countries that need it.

He predicted that the so-called 2030 agenda will have a “profound impact on specific operations of the United Nations and its system.”

The agenda and its adoption later this month is among several watershed events in 2015, including the Third International Conference on Financing for Development, held in Addis Ababa in July and the upcoming UN climate change conference that will be held in Paris in December.

Source: UN News Center

Also see selected articles here on our blog over the last few weeks, blog.globcal.net and follow our news feeds on Globalization and the SDGs using Google News. It is our understanding that most major Internet platforms are all collaborating and supporting the global change with the help of over 98% of the world governments including social network giants Facebook, Google, LinkedIn and Twitter. 

Friday, September 11, 2015

Irresistible SDGs to Change our World-View

What are the Sustainable Development Goals and why do they matter?

Barcelona, Spain - Sept 10 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - In late September, world leaders will meet at the United Nations in New York to adopt a new global plan of action for ending poverty, known as the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). 

President Barack Obama views Bear Glacier on a boat
tour of Kenai Fjords National Park in Seward, Alaska Sept. 1.
What are the SDGs? A set of 17 goals and 169 targets aimed at resolving the social, economic and environmental problems troubling the world. Covering the next 15 years, the SDGs replace the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) which expire this year. Who decided the SDGs? Governments came up with the idea at the Rio+20 conference on sustainable development in Brazil in 2012. A working group with representatives from 70 countries then drafted a proposed set of goals.

At the same time, the United Nations ran public consultations around the world and an online survey asking people about their priorities for the goals.

This summer governments negotiated a final version of the SDGs, due to be adopted by 193 countries at a Sept. 25-27 summit at the United Nations in New York. What did the MDGs achieve? The United Nations says the MDGs led to achievements including: - a drop in the number of people living in extreme poverty by more than half, to 836 million in 2015 - gender parity in primary schools in the majority of countries - a reduction in the rate of children dying before their fifth birthday by more than half since 1990 - a fall of 45 percent worldwide in maternal mortality - over 6.2 million malaria deaths averted and 37 million lives saved by tuberculosis prevention and treatment - access to improved drinking water sources for 2.6 billion people between 1990 and 2015 So why do we need the SDGs? - Around 800 million people still live in extreme poverty and suffer from hunger, with fragile and conflict-torn states experiencing the highest poverty rates - Between 2008 and 2012, 144 million people were displaced from their homes by natural disasters, a number predicted to rise as the planet warms, bringing more extreme weather and rising seas - Water scarcity affects 40 percent of the global population and is projected to increase - Some 946 million people still practice open defecation - Gender inequality persists in spite of more representation for women in parliaments and more girls going to school. If we meet the SDGs, how will the world improve? The 17 goals aim to achieve these wider aims by 2030: - end poverty and hunger everywhere - combat inequalities within and between countries - build peaceful, just and inclusive societies - protect human rights and promote gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls - ensure lasting protection of the planet and its natural resources - create conditions for sustainable, inclusive and sustained economic growth, shared prosperity and decent work for all. What's new and different about the SDGs? The United Nations says the SDGs go much further than the previous goals, because they address the root causes of poverty and pledge to leave no one behind, including vulnerable groups

They also emphasise the need to tackle climate change urgently and protect the environment through a shift to sustainable consumption and production.

The SDGs are intended to be universal, applying to all countries rather than just the developing world.

They recognise the key role of the private sector in pursuing and financing sustainable development, in partnership with governments and civil society. (Sources: United Nations Development Programme and other U.N. agencies. Further information: sustainabledevelopment.un.org )

(Reporting by Megan Rowling; editing by Katie Nguyen. Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, women's rights, trafficking, corruption and climate change. Visit trust.org )

Take Action: Become Part of the Change!

Join us at Globcal International as a Global Citizen or Goodwill Ambassador of the United Nations SDGs and the Post-2015 Agenda. Members will have special access to thousands of locations around the globe as well as gain special privileges, benefits, entitlements, and other perks through our pilot program which is available to all people willing to leave behind religious, monarchical, and state based populist political systems to adopt the new emerging global perspectives based on the ecosystem, the rule of law, and Internet governance.

Most involved participants will be asked to travel and use the social media to promote their work and adventures as global citizens and goodwill ambassadors. 

Tuesday, August 4, 2015

193 Nations in Agreement with Global Agenda

Consensus Reached on New Sustainable Development Agenda to be adopted by World Leaders in September



Ambitious new agenda would end poverty by 2030 and universally promote shared economic prosperity, social development and environmental protection

The 193 Member States of the United Nations reached agreement today on the outcome document that will constitute the new sustainable development agenda that will be adopted this September by world leaders at the Sustainable Development Summit in New York.

Concluding a negotiating process that has spanned more than two years and has featured the unprecedented participation of civil society, countries agreed to an ambitious agenda that features 17 new sustainable development goals that aim to end poverty, promote prosperity and people’s well-being while protecting the environment by 2030.

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon welcomed the agreement, saying it “encompasses a universal, transformative and integrated agenda that heralds an historic turning point for our world.”

“This is the People’s Agenda, a plan of action for ending poverty in all its dimensions, irreversibly, everywhere, and leaving no one behind. It seeks to ensure peace and prosperity, and forge partnerships with people and planet at the core. The integrated, interlinked and indivisible 17 Sustainable Development Goals are the people’s goals and demonstrate the scale, universality and ambition of this new Agenda.”

Mr. Ban said the September Summit, where the new agenda will be adopted, “will chart a new era of Sustainable Development in which poverty will be eradicated, prosperity shared and the core drivers of climate change tackled.”

He added that the UN System stands ready to support the implementation of the new agenda, which builds on the successful outcome of the Third International Conference on Financing for Development in Addis Ababa, and which, he said, will also contribute to achieve a meaningful agreement in the COP21 in Paris in December.

More than 150 world leaders are expected to attend the Sustainable Development Summit at the UN headquarters in New York between 25 to 27 September to formally adopt the outcome document of the new sustainable agenda.

The new sustainable development agenda builds on the success of the Millennium Development Goals, which helped more than 700 million people escape poverty. The eight Millennium Development Goals, adopted in 2000, aimed at an array of issues that included slashing poverty, hunger, disease, gender inequality, and access to water and sanitation by 2015.

The new sustainable development goals, and the broader sustainablity agenda, go much further, addressing the root causes of poverty and the universal need for development that works for all people.

The preamble of the 29-page text, “Transforming Our World: The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development,” states, “We are resolved to free the human race from the tyranny of poverty and want and to heal and secure our planet.” It continues, “We are determined to take the bold and transformative steps which are urgently needed to shift the world onto a sustainable and resilient path. As we embark on this collective journey, we pledge that no one will be left behind.”

Rio+20 and the intergovernmental process


At the Rio+20 Conference of 2012, Member States agreed to launch a process to develop a set of sustainable development goals, which will build upon the Millennium Development Goals. The Millennium Development Goals have proven that goal-setting can lift millions out of poverty, improve well-being and provide vast new opportunities for better lives. It was agreed that the new goals would be global in nature and universally applicable to all countries while taking into account different national realities, capacities and levels of development and respecting national policies and priorities.

The negotiations were co-facilitated by the UN Permanent Representative of Ireland, Ambassador David Donohue, and the UN Permanent Representative of Kenya, Ambassador Macharia Kamau, over two years. The inclusive and transparent consultations by Member States, with the strong engagement of civil society and other stakeholders, have served as a basis for the conclusion of the intergovernmental negotiations on the emerging universal and people-centred agenda.

Core elements of the agreed outcome document


The outcome document highlights poverty eradication as the overarching goal of the new development agenda and has at its core the integration of the economic, social and environmental dimensions of sustainable development. The emerging development agenda is unique in that it calls for action by all countries, poor, rich and middle-income. Member States pledge that as they embark on this collective journey, no one will be left behind. The ‘five Ps’—people, planet, prosperity, peace, and partnership—capture the broad scope of the agenda.

The 17 sustainable goals and 169 targets aim at tackling key systemic barriers to sustainable development such as inequality, unsustainable consumption and production patterns, inadequate infrastructure and lack of decent jobs. The environmental dimension of sustainable

development is covered in the goals on oceans and marine resources and on ecosystems and biodiversity, bringing core issues into the goal and target framework.

The means of implementation outlined in the outcome document match its ambitious goals and focus on finance, technology and capacity development. In addition to a stand-alone goal on the means of implementation for the new agenda, specific means are tailored to each of the sustainable development goals.

Member States stressed that the desired transformations will require a departure from “business as usual” and that intensified international cooperation on many fronts will be required. The agenda calls for a revitalized, global partnership for sustainable development, including for multi-stakeholder partnerships. The agenda also calls for increased capacity-building and better data and statistics to measure sustainable development.

An effective follow-up and review architecture – a core element of the outcome document – will be critical to support the implementation of the new agenda. The High Level Political Forum on sustainable development, set up after the Rio+20 Conference, will serve as the apex forum for follow up and review and will thus play a central role. The General Assembly, the Economic and Social Council and specialized agencies will also be engaged in reviewing progress in specific areas.

Based on the outcome document, the agenda will include a Technology Facilitation Mechanism to support the new goals, based on multi-stakeholder collaboration between Member States, civil society, business, the scientific community, and the UN system of agencies. The Mechanism, which was agreed at the Addis Conference in July, will have an inter-agency task team, a forum on science, technology and innovation, and an on-line platform for collaboration.

The successful outcome of the Addis Conference gave important positive momentum to the last stretch of negotiations on the post-2015 development agenda. It is expected that the consensus reached on the outcome document will provide momentum for the negotiations on a new binding climate change treaty to culminate at the Climate Change Conference in Paris from 30 November to 11 December 2015.

The draft agreement can be found at https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/post2015

For further information, please contact Sharon Birch, UN Department of Public Information.

1 212 963-0564, e: birchs@un.org and Francyne Harrigan, 1 917 367-5414 e: harriganf@un.org