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Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Peace is More Popular than War

Download the Building Blocks for Peace poster.

Celebrate the International Day of Peace

On the International Day of Peace, 21 September 2016, let us create an effective teamwork for the betterment of our future, for the planet and for the human race.

We get daily reports on human rights abuses, violence, wars and injustice around the world. This is very sad facts, but we must continue to believe in the goodness of man. We must continue to believe that we all together can make a change.

Let us try to see all the people in the world as a big team where we all work together in a teamwork and make efforts to reach our common goals. This is what world leaders did in September 2015, when leaders from 193 countries came together at an historic UN Summit to sign the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

This agenda includes 17 different goals, The Sustainable Development Goals, as follows:
  • Goal 1: End poverty in all its forms everywhere.
  • Goal 2: End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture.
  • Goal 3: Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages.
  • Goal 4: Ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning.
  • Goal 5: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls.
  • Goal 6: Ensure access to water and sanitation for all.
  • Goal 7: Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all.
  • Goal 8: Promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth, employment and decent work for all.
  • Goal 9: Build resilient infrastructure, promote sustainable industrialization and foster innovation.
  • Goal 10: Reduce inequality within and among countries.
  • Goal 11: Make cities inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable.
  • Goal 12: Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns.
  • Goal 13: Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts.
  • Goal 14: Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources.
  • Goal 15: Sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, halt and reverse land degradation, halt biodiversity loss.
  • Goal 16: Promote just, peaceful and inclusive societies.
  • Goal 17: Revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development.

I think we all can agree that these are very important goals. With these goals in our mind, let us start to make common efforts for the betterment of our future. Each one of us is an important and necessary part of this teamwork. What we do counts. Small act or big act - it does not matter. The most important thing is that we all take action together. Action is needed to make things happen. Let us start today to spread awareness about these 17 Sustainable Development Goals. These are our goals for a better future for us all. Our goals for a better future for our planet, which we all desperately depend on. Let us take care of each other and protect all living creatures!

Global Citizenship

for the sake of Peace

I would like to take this occasion to promote Global Citizenship, because I believe in Global Citizenship for the sake of peace. There have been too many nationalist communities in the human history, leading to decline and destruction. This is one of the reasons why I believe in Global Citizenship as our global solution. The Global Citizenship Registry is a program initiated by David Wright and Globcal International. It is a program where we all have the chance to come together in a big, global family, where we all share our responsibility for our planet and our human race. We all have our universal human rights in common. Each member of this great big family is an equal. We believe that intercultural understanding, tolerance, nonviolence and mutual respect all are important building stones in our big mosaic of peace.

Our Global Citizenship program is developed to work in partnership with the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. Global Citizenship has become our vehicle for attaining them. Every single one who is signing up for the Global Citizenship Registry get access to a great amount of educational and informational material. And education is, as we all know, of great importance for lasting peace.

By signing the Global Citizenship Pledge, we promise:
to maintain a neutral worldview free of religious, political, national, racial or tribal favoritism or discrimination.
to promote intercultural understanding, tolerance, nonviolence and mutual respect.
to promote a global ethic of citizenship and shared responsibility.
to work for the full implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals.
to protect the planet from degradation, including through sustainable consumption and production and sustainably managing its natural resources.
to take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts.
to protect human rights and promote equality.
to live in peace and harmony with all other citizens and settlements.

The Sustainable Development Goals: Building Blocks for Peace


The International Day of Peace is observed on 21 September. The day’s theme for 2016 is “The Sustainable Development Goals: Building Blocks for Peace.” Every single one of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals is a building block in the global architecture of peace. The United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s message for the day is:

“The people of the world have asked us to shine a light on a future of promise and opportunity. Member States have responded with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development… It is an agenda for people, to end poverty in all its forms. An agenda for the planet, our common home. An agenda for shared prosperity, peace and partnership. “

In the society of today, we face many challenges such as poverty, hunger, diminishing natural resources, water scarcity, social inequality, human rights abuses, violence, environmental degradation, diseases, corruption, racism and xenophobia. Every single one of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals can be seen as solutions to overcome these challenges. Let us use the blocks to build our peaceful society today. We are all in this fragile world together. We need to protect our planet and take good care of each other.

May Peace prevail on Earth.

Article by Maria Veneke Ylikomi, Goodwill Ambassador, Globcal International

Saturday, September 10, 2016

e-Residency is Virtual Global Citizenship

This Tiny Country Thinks Virtual Citizens Will Make It Rich

Estonia aims to bring 10 million people to its digital shores.
July 27, 2016 by Nanette Byrnes, MIT Technology Review

With 1.3 million citizens, Estonia is one of the smallest countries in Europe, but its ambition is to become one of the largest countries in the world. Not one of the largest geographically or even by number of citizens, however. Largest in e-residents, a category of digital affiliation that it hopes will attract people, especially entrepreneurs.

Started two years ago, e-residency gives citizens of any nation the opportunity to set up Estonian bank accounts and businesses that use a verified digital signature and are operated remotely, online. The program is an outgrowth of a digitization of government services that the country launched 15 years ago in a bid to save money on the staffing of government offices. Today Estonians use their mandatory digital identity to do everything from track their medical care to pay their taxes.

Now the country is marketing e-residency as a path by which any business owner can set up and run a business in the European Union, benefiting from low business costs, digital bureaucratic infrastructure, and in certain cases, from the country’s low tax rates.

“If you want to run a fully functional company in the EU, in a good business climate, from anyplace in the world, all you need is an e-residency and a computer,” says Estonian prime minister Taavi Rõivas.


Things that don’t come with e-residency include a passport and citizenship. Nor do e-residents automatically owe taxes to the country, though digital companies that incorporate there and obtain a physical address can benefit from the country’s low tax rate. The chance to run a business out of Estonia has proven popular enough that almost 700 new businesses have been set up by the nearly 1,000 new e-residents, according to statistics from the government.

The government hopes to have 10 million e-residents by 2025, though others think that goal is a stretch.
Estonian officials describe e-residency as an early step toward a mobile future, one in which countries will compete for the best people. And they are not the only ones pursing this idea. Payment company Stripe recently launched a program called Atlas that it hopes will boost the number of companies using its services to accept payments. It helps global Internet businesses incorporate in the state of Delaware, open a bank account, and get tax and legal guidance.

Juan Pablo Vazquez Sampere, a professor at Madrid’s IE Business School, sees the Estonia program as enabling global entrepreneurs to operate in Europe at a fraction of the cost of living in the region.

Last year, Arvind Kumar, an electrical engineer who lives just outside Mumbai, left his 30-year-career in the steel industry to start Kaytek Solutions OÜ, which creates models to improve manufacturing quality and efficiency. Last September Kumar flew to Tallinn, the capital of Estonia, and spent half a day setting up a bank account and a virtual office. In addition to the price of the trip, initial setup costs were around $3,300 (€3,000), and he has ongoing expenses of about $480 (€440) a year. The Indian system of setting up a new business is “tedious” by contrast, says Kumar—time-consuming, difficult, and expensive.

Cost was also a factor for Vojkan Tasic, chairman of a high-end car service company called Limos4, in his decision to pick Estonia as a new home for the company. Started in his home country of Serbia six years ago, Limos4 has been paying credit-card processing fees of 7 percent. Limos4 operates in 20 large European cities as well as Dubai and Istanbul, and counts Saudi Arabian and Swedish royalty and U.S. and European celebrities among its clients.

After considering Delaware and Ireland, Tasic chose Estonia, where he can settle his credit-card transactions through PayPal subsidiary Braintree for 2.9 percent and where there is no tax on corporate profits so long as they remain invested in the business. Since getting his e-residency and moving the company to Estonia, profits are up 20 percent, Tasic says. Annual revenue is around $2 million.

For Estonia, the financial benefit comes from the fees e-residents pay to the government and the tax revenue local support services like accountants and law firms make.

To Tasic, who runs background checks on all his drivers, one of the best things about the e-residency is the fact that the Estonian police investigate every applicant. Since Kumar set up his company, Estonia has begun allowing e-residents to set up their bank accounts online, but there remains a level of security, because to pick up their residency card, applicants must go in person to one of Estonia’s 39 embassies around the world and prove their identity.

Some have raised concerns that the e-residence might attract shady characters who could shield themselves from prosecution and possible punishment by doing business in Estonia but residing outside of its jurisdiction. But with no serious cases of fraud or illicit activity to date, it is unclear whether this is a serious concern, says Karsten Staehr, a professor of international and public finance at Tallinn University of Technology.

As with any digital system, security is a major concern. Estonia, which sits just to the west of Russia and south of the Gulf of Finland, recently announced plans to back up much of its data, including banking credentials, birth records, and critical government information, in the United Kingdom.

In 2007 the country suffered a sustained denial-of-service cyberattack linked to Russia after moving a Soviet war memorial from Tallinn city center and has run a distributed system for some time with data centers in every embassy in the world.

“I am convinced they are doing a good job,” says Tasic, who holds a PhD in information services. “But with increased attention, the attacks will increase, so let’s see what the future is.”


 

Monday, September 5, 2016

Align your Business with the SDGs

Is Your Business Aligned with the U.N. Sustainable Development Goals?

By Clinton Moloney and Don Reed, Triple Pundit Correspondents

2015 was a pivotal year in turning the tide on major sustainability issues. One of the key drivers of this shift was the release of the United Nations’ (U.N.) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) last fall, aimed to propel the business community and the whole world to align their corporate strategies to help make real progress on social, economic and environmental issues for years to come.

The 17 SDGs make up a cohesive environmental and social sustainability vision that serves as a call-to-action for governments, civil society, and businesses to rethink their core strategies, missions and values and contribute to these goals in an overall effort to have positive, lasting contributions to our quality of life and our planet.

Everyone within a civil society agrees with the 17 basic goals.

The SDGs will function as a vehicle that will allow businesses to find the intersection between where they can contribute to society and their core business values and purpose. And at a fundamental level, a business that is operating in a way that is aligned to solving major societal challenges will be more resilient over the long term. Companies are usually clear on the positive impacts they’re already having on society. The SDGs offer a new lens to look at and communicate the social issues they currently have the most bearing on, and where they may fall short.

Global expectations are already high for the SDGs, but what about the perception among U.S. businesses? For one, there’s a high awareness level among U.S. corporations – recent PwC research found that more than 90 percent of businesses are familiar with the SDGs. Moreover, companies are already considering their own impact on the SDGs with some 40 percent planning to conduct an annual review to assess that impact.

Businesses have a real opportunity to turn the complexity of the global goals as part of their overall corporate strategy. But what are the best practices and processes for supporting the SDGs and kicking off the process of embedding them into their fundamental business framework?

We’ve identified four key steps companies need to take to commence successful engagement with the SDGs:
Determine the impact your business and its value chain have on each of the SDGs, both directly and indirectly. Governments may have different priorities for the SDGs, so for global companies, it’s critical to understand in detail each country’s priorities where business operates.

Agree on the methodology and measure your business impact across all these SDGs. Data and analytics can help you understand where your business has a positive or negative impact on each SDG. There are tools available that can help provide total impact measurement.

Incorporate the learnings from your measurement into business planning and strategy to prioritize reducing negative impacts and increasing the positive. This will lead to the ability to prove your role in the SDGs.
Communicate your business goals and achievements consistently with the SDGs. Outside of sustainability reports, these impacts should be integrated into overall company communications such as annual reports, SEC filings and customer communications.

Many companies are looking to adopt the goals that are the most relevant to their businesses and where they can contribute the most to society, as well as areas where they are able to engage their stakeholders. For example, a pharmaceutical company may concentrate on good health and well-being (goal No. 3), while a major consumer brand that targets female retailers may start with its impact on women and equality (No. 5).

Aligning specific SDGs to business growth strategy works well as long as companies understand where they have impacts across all the goals – positive or negative – and can gain a complete perspective of their sustainability opportunities. And after corporations get a handle on communicating the issues where they already have known business value and positive impact in SDG terms, they can move on to uncover new opportunities to have an impact in other areas.

Making a smooth transition to this new model where SDGs play a central role in operational considerations as well as planning, reporting and strategy could make all the difference in helping to achieve the SDGs.

Image credit: United Nations

Clinton Moloney is PwC’s U.S. Sustainable Business Solutions Advisory Leader
Don Reed is a Managing Director in PwC’s U.S. Sustainable Business Solutions Practice

Tuesday, August 30, 2016

New Global Human Identity Standards

New Global Identity Standards World-Wide

This year the World Economic Forum (WEF) with the collaboration of many well known and many not so well known corporate and nongovernmental organizations devised a new road map (blueprint) this month for the global financial community to utilize here-forth for everyone's mutual benefit and financial protection beyond our borders to establish a universal (global) identity verification system.

Security Document World said, "In the report, the WEF calls on financial institutions to lead the charge in developing robust digital identity solutions that would bring benefits to users, financial institutions, and society as a whole."

Lots of New Articles

Digital biometric scanner, soon to be very commonplace at international ports.
Over the last several weeks we have seen a great increase in the number of news articles being presented involving identity, biometric identification, digital banking and new governmental identification programs on our 'Human Rights and Identity' news feed. In the United States last week the government began to require biometric (digital) photo identification (Real ID) at government facilities including all military bases and institutional centers.

The United Nations with the World Bank announced late last year the ID4D, Identification for Development program which promises that they will work to help see that every human being on the planet has an identity by 2020. Since 2014 over 50 new multi-million corporations have quietly emerged globally to work and contract their innovative services and products for banks, people and governments.

Perhaps you have heard of some of the larger well-known corporations and global players that are being recognized as leaders of the new identification industry; PayPal, Deloitte, Unisys, Experian, Caribou Digital, Facebook, and Consent are working together as a consortium of corporations in these innovations right now. The United States and United Kingdom governments also have great interests and involvement in pushing forward and creating the new identity industries that will have an annual value in the hundreds of billions of dollars per year.
MeReal Cards private secure fool-proof biometrics.

Human Identity Revolution

Taking the lead in the human identity revolution in recent years has not been the United States but surprisingly is India, Pakistan, Honduras, Ecuador and Brazil who are all using digital biometric elements for human identification at their borders and in airports.

Between now and 2020, as a research analyst, I can safely speculate that there will 300,000+ universal identity verification terminals will be installed in airports, border crossings, checkpoints, and sea ports around the world accepting over 1000 different passports and electronic access credentials. Within the industry many anticipate many new emerging states and jurisdictions all using high tech credentials. All people including diplomats identity will be referenced in the global system based on their legal credentials.

Nation-states will not be the sole providers of identification, the corporations listed above are as integral in the system as the government once was and so are companies like Coca-Cola, Google, IBM, WWF, and other transnational global corporations and organizations with special international employment credentials, services and protection.

Changing the System after 83 Years

Many people do not realize but it has only been since about 1933 that nations have been fully involved in collecting data, claiming people and registering their citizens as assets. Only now citizens, (people) of all types will become more versatile (free?) in to whom 'they choose' to serve as citizens, demonstrating self-determination and taking on their social responsibility as residents of a country or place, which is in essence what citizenship is all about anyway. It is a whole new ball game under our true human rights!

Non-National Blockchain Identification

It is suggested that neither the government or state can be trusted with our identity and several years ago people began to experiment with encrypted digital block-chains online that are like indelible electronic ink.

Many people are betting the revolution will be dominated by non-national blockchain registries of confidential encrypted data based on a similar system as Bitcoin. Recently we witnessed the rollout of Bitnation Pangaea which offers a comfortable solution for those who wish to protect their privacy. Their system allows for contract registration, notarization of documents and marriages.

A recent article from 'themerkle' identifies four blockchain companies focusing on secure digital identity solutions. The companies named in the article are Evernym, Blockstack Labs, KYC-Chain, and UniquID, all the companies have clear developments and niches staked out.

There will be private, dual, multi-national, corporate, university, cooperative, organizational and nation-state citizenships; I imagine that the transitional period to acquire all of our human rights will strangely enough all compete for our allegiance as their human capital and all have a hand in defining our identity in an official way.

Understanding the new system is hard to imagine until you understand the new emergent law based on the (new) Universal Declaration of Human Rights and place yourself at sea (stateless) without any citizenship. Our concept resolves the problem of finding a place to land your ship based on the law, your knowledge, education, experience, abilities and asset value as a human being within our cooperative or in your identity as a global citizen instead of a refugee or stateless person. The best thing about our stateless neocitizenship development is that it utilizes other accepted systems as our base.

Rapid Change Ahead

From the great advancement and progress we currently see in government use of biometric identification, we should expect that all nations and territories will soon meet the new international requirements within the next five years. Governments in some countries already restrict access to national and state parks, top organizations around the world have special biometric digital identification for their executive and volunteer assets.

The new industry-focused documents we found online this week reveal great new opportunities and outstanding potential for entrepreneurs with ideals to create both soft, medium and hard identification systems. However the way the industry is developed there will be little chance to enter the horizontal global market so would-be market developers and thinkers need to decide which floor they want to begin with.

"New entrants into this space will have to navigate a layer that may look like a sandwich filling between two slices of bread, one being Facebook’s (at the moment) light verification identity platform and the other being any state-led identity platform—in other words, at both ends of the spectrum there are incumbents which will be difficult to compete against."

"Advancements in biometrics, encryption, and distributed computing are leading to sophisticated technology solutions and new business models for managing digital identity. But again we must emphasize that while the technology is easy to focus on, the 'analog complements' in this sector—the regulatory environments, political structures, cultural attitudes, and more—are just as critical for success, especially given their diversity across different markets."

Banking Technology and Safety

It does not stop here, people that need to use money and the financial system will be able to use their natural biometric indicators like fingerprints, iris scans, cards with microchips, cellular smartphones, or passports and other identity devices. The financial sector is the strongest component behind personal identity verification and international security, they are insisting on biometrics.

The more that is known about the things that occur in our civil societies and civilization bring safety and security to the law abiding and good people that we all want to be. The ideals regarding identity, human taxonomy, corporate citizenship, and migration being implemented today will revolutionize life on the planet and how we perceive ourselves as human beings. It will make sustainability a reality, reduce corruption and make life more accountable.

Follow this subject by following our Human Identity News Feed, new stories daily! Globcal International provides access to a variety of news feeds to our members and the public to know the current trends and adapt with the changes ahead.

Friday, August 26, 2016

Human Empowerment through Cooperation

Making the Cooperative the Ideal Business Model

The ideal of the 'cooperative' was first developed in the 1820s, long before privately held corporations by individuals, based on the development of the free and fair exchange of legally held assets through common ownership of a business or distribution system designed to benefit its members who collectively own the institution as a society. The non-profit and for profit co-operative embodiment today has become a solid institutional part of the corporate laws of many countries while in other countries that depend on the concept of international cooperation from other nations have yet to allow the concept of an employee owned business or corporation to emerge in their legal systems. Cooperatives are tax-free and generally protected by governments as social orders within the area of human and civil rights in addition to being legal businesses.

Cooperatives empower communities.
Cooperatives are and remain to be the safest, most sustainable and lowest-risk type of an investment an individual can make because the foundation of the cooperative involve intangible assets, membership involves special rights, privileges and benefits that are available through belonging. In a cooperative members in essence belong to one another equally and are responsible for perpetuating the cooperatorship. Globcal International has developed the first international cooperatorship that is truly non-governmental because it is formed as a non-state actor and bases its jurisdiction in the offshore international realm of the high-seas under admiralty, maritime and international law.

What you choose to follow or be a part of in life is generally based solely in your personal character and personality, but we do know that, once people begin to realize the potential of cooperatives and the benefits that are possible they will always cherish their cooperative memberships with our global development and by being a part of cooperatives locally in their own communities, cooperatives are security. Cooperatives are known for being socially responsible, fair, fraternal, equal and democratic. They are also designed to distribute benefits and profits equally to members. Commentary by David J. Wright

For information regarding the reformation of your business for the international sector or remove your state of incorporation or to offshore your personal character and intellectual property to a tax-free jurisdiction, then join us at Globcal International as a non-state citizen, then see the membership link on our blog.

Scaling Up Cooperatives to Reach the Sustainable Development Goals

Article: Huffington-Post

Cooperatives are Naturally the Best Way to promote the SDGs

Cooperatives empower women.
Long before Uber or Airbnb, cooperatives capitalized on a sharing economy, but with an explicit mission to share benefits with everyone in society, especially the poor and vulnerable. Cooperatives have a storied history and carry distinct advantages in addressing the needs of low-income people. They rely on sharing information and trust in communities around a common purpose.

Over the decades, cooperatives have had success in areas like savings, agriculture, housing, or distribution of electricity. While there have been many improvements, they have faced challenges in areas such as tax policy, discriminatory regulation, achieving scale, and prevailing business attitudes toward their mission and business model.

To achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) — a set of 17 global goals which seek to end poverty by 2030, promote peace, and preserve the planet for future generations — we need to take advantage of the power of cooperatives. The SDGs fit nicely under the umbrella of the World Bank Group’s twin goals of ending poverty by 2030 and promoting shared prosperity.

The work is daunting, particularly in the area of financial inclusion. In 2014, only 62 percent of the world’s adult population had a financial account - leaving 2 billion adults without one.

Cooperative Financial Institutions (or CFI’s) include savings and credit cooperatives, credit unions, financial cooperatives, as well as savings and loan associations. They are key strategic partners in achieving both the goals of universal financial access, ending extreme poverty. They have low operating costs and are located in remote, rural areas with no financial institutions.

Yet for many of these member-owned institutions, scaling up savings services is impaired by challenges related to management and staff capacity, governance, and oversight and supervision. Some financial cooperatives and credit unions cannot safely lend funds received as deposits due to lack of credit capacity and systems.

We can help financial cooperatives scale-up by supporting them with technical advice and new technology to help them share data and information with their clients and with development practitioners. They can also benefit from active global partnerships with multilateral institutions, non-governmental organizations, and the private sector.

CFIs are one of the main providers of financial services to low-income people, with 700 million members and accountholders worldwide. CFIs have large constituencies in India, China, Indonesia, Brazil, Mexico, Kenya, Morocco, and over 35 smaller developing countries such as Togo and Haiti.

Last year, the World Bank Group’s private sector arm, the IFC, had an estimated $500 million of investments in CFIs around the world. The World Bank Group has been active for decades in this area. Some of the most notable programs include the Indian Dairy Cooperative, which has created an estimated 250,000 jobs, mostly in rural areas. Similarly, Mexico’s National Savings and Financial Services Bank has helped strengthen savings and credit institutions that serve millions of rural residents, who would otherwise have been relegated to the margins of the formal financial sector.

The World Bank Group’s policy teams have helped governments supervise and regulate cooperative financial institutions. For example, in 2009, the Bank Group worked with Rwanda to strengthen both the supervision and reach of Savings and Credit Cooperatives. By mid-2012 financial access in Rwanda increased from 47 percent to 72 percent. The newly created savings and credit cooperatives played an important role in this increase since they operated in 215 rural locations in which no financial institution existed previously. And the partnership with Rwanda also significantly increased the financial sustainability of the savings and credit cooperatives.

In a more mobile and urban world, cooperatives must adapt, while maintaining their basic values and approach. As seen in Sub-Saharan Africa, mobile money accounts can drive financial inclusion. While just 1 percent of adults globally say they use a mobile money account and nothing else, in Sub-Saharan Africa, 12 percent of adults (64 million adults) have mobile money accounts (compared to just 2 percent worldwide); 45 percent of them have only a mobile money account. Mobile money accounts can help narrow the gap in financial inclusion between men and women, which could have important effects on inequality and child welfare. CFIs will have to stay abreast of these developments and exploit these new technologies to maximize financial inclusion, particularly for the poor.

Capitalizing on cooperatives’ successes and learning from their mistakes can help us expand the menu of options as we search for more inclusive and sustainable models of development, and new ways of building and sharing knowledge. In this way we can significantly contribute to our common goal of ending extreme poverty in a single generation.

Republished from the Huffington Post, Scaling Up Cooperatives to Reach the Sustainable Development Goals by Mahmoud Mohieldin Senior Vice President for the 2030 Development Agenda, UN Relations and Partnerships